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Towards a systems approach in Ecodesign and Energy Labelling: How to make the political ambition a reality?

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View recordings of the workshop at https://youtu.be/06U1MXlLaNs

It is widely recognised that there are substantial additional energy savings to be made from taking a system approach – considering how products are combined and operate together. However, political ambition has not resulted in regulation. During this workshop, policy makers and key stakeholders will discuss implementation barriers and explore possible remedies.

The European Copper Institute commissioned research to look into the experience with developing system related ecodesign and energy labelling regulations to date (Brocklehurst, 2021). In their review, the authors analysed the common characteristics and challenges related to ecodesign and energy labelling of eight product groups that, at least to some extent, go beyond a ‘simple’ product.
During this workshop, the authors will present the findings of their study. Policy makers will be invited to present their views on taking the systems approach in ongoing product regulation initiatives. During a debate, we will invite stakeholders to share their experiences and views on systems approach in product regulation. We will evaluate implementation barriers and explore possible remedies.

PRESENTATIONS
* Welcome and introduction (Diedert Debusscher, ECI)
* A review of systems approaches in Ecodesign and Energy Labelling (Fiona Brocklehurst, Ballarat Consulting)
* Transforming product efficiency policy into system efficiency policy (Hans-Paul Siderius, Netherlands Enterprise Agency)
* Views from the EU Commission (Ronald Piers De Raveschoot, ENER.B3)
* Case study: Pump systems (Michael Könen, Europump)

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Towards a systems approach in Ecodesign and Energy Labelling: How to make the political ambition a reality?

  1. 1. Towards a systems approach in Ecodesign and Energy labelling – How to make the political ambition a reality? eceee Partner Event – European Copper Institute 17 June 2021
  2. 2. Source Why this workshop? | Systems approach in Ecodesign and Energy Labelling - ECI workshop 17 June 2021 2 Distance: -224 Mtoe by 2030 Regulating Systems: - 290 Mtoe by 2030 Ecodesign Regulation: - 230 Mtoe by 2030 MOTORS - 72 Mtoe LIGHTING - 19 Mtoe … CABLES - 6 Mtoe additional
  3. 3. Many political actors have identified the need to thinking beyond products • Advised looking for opportunities at systems level (up to functional system) >>link MEErP (2011) • Recommends that energy saving potential of product systems could be better exploited >>link EU Commission Technical report (2014) • Urges the Commission to include more system-level opportunities >>own initiative report and >>EPRS IA EU Parliament (2018) • Package label for space and water heaters • Preparatory studies have considered system approaches Ecodesign & Energy Labelling | Systems approach in Ecodesign and Energy Labelling - ECI workshop 17 June 2021 3
  4. 4. | Systems approach in Ecodesign and Energy Labelling - ECI workshop 17 June 2021 5 “If it were easy, we would have done it already” Complexities are inherent to each system. Ignoring them comes at a cost.
  5. 5. Focus for today’s discussion Product policies Other regulations and policy tools | Systems approach in Ecodesign and Energy Labelling - ECI workshop 17 June 2021 6
  6. 6. Agenda 10:30 Welcome and introduction (Diedert Debusscher, ECI) 10:40 A review of systems approaches in Ecodesign and Energy Labelling (Fiona Brocklehurst, Ballarat Consulting) 11:00 Transforming product efficiency policy into system efficiency policy (Hans-Paul Siderius, Netherlands Enterprise Agency) 11:10 Views from the EU Commission (Ronald Piers De Raveschoot, ENER.B3) 11:20 Case study: Pump systems (Michael Könen, Europump) 11:30 Discussion and Q&A 11:50 Wrap up and next steps 12:00 Adjourn 7 | Systems approach in Ecodesign and Energy Labelling - ECI workshop 17 June 2021
  7. 7. A REVIEW OF SYSTEMS APPROACHES IN ECODESIGN AND ENERGY LABELLING Fiona Brocklehurst, Ballarat Consulting 17 June 2021
  8. 8. Outline • Systems vs products • Operational regulations • Studies to date • Findings from studies: • Points in favour • Common issues and possible solutions • Ways forward? 2 | Presentation title and date
  9. 9. Systems vs products Products Systems Sold individually Assembled or installed Mass produced Could be ‘standard set’ of components but could be unique Needs measurement standard/ transition methodology – generally developed Needs measurement standard/ transition methodology – not always available Performance can be measured in a lab Performance needs to be measured in-situ or modelled Manufacturer/supplier has responsibility Installer/designer has responsibility | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 3
  10. 10. Regulations to date: heater and water heater package energy labels | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 4
  11. 11. European studies to date | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 5 Walk in cold room Case study method for heating system Initial prep study 2011. Current review study JRC study 2016
  12. 12. European studies to date | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 6 Lighting systems Points system Prep study completed 2017 Prep study completed 2017
  13. 13. European studies to date || ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 7 Pumps Solar photovoltaics Review study completed 2018 Prep study completed 2019, supporting study ongoing?
  14. 14. European studies to date | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 8 Power cables Building Automation and Control systems Prep study completed? Prep study completed 2015
  15. 15. Different applications, different technologies: common threads? | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 9
  16. 16. Advantages | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 10 SAVINGS € € CO2 kWh CO2 kWh
  17. 17. Other advantages | | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 11 Industry support Potential for job growth? Enabling MS grant schemes Consistency across EU
  18. 18. Common issues and possible solutions Need: • System measurement standard or transitional methodology Identify if missing early on and develop • Consistent Methodology/Tool To Calculate System Efficiency Identify if missing and develop as part of preparatory study • Easy access to component data EPREL? Member State database? Industry data base? Digital product passport? | | | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 12
  19. 19. Change in responsibility for compliance Possible solutions: new business models? Specialist insurance? | | | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 13 MANUFACTURER/ SUPPLIER INSTALLER/ DESIGNER
  20. 20. Market surveillance issues and possible solutions • Uncertainty on legal mandate to check installations EC advise on interpretation Member States review/revise permissions • Inspecting multiple installations vs few samples of a product Grouping into ‘standard’ types? Technical documentation? Modelling? | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 14 x 3 vs x 1000?
  21. 21. Market surveillance issues and possible solutions • Notification when put into service Database of installations? • Retaining energy label Digital Building Logbook? Digital product passport? | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 15
  22. 22. Where next? | | ECI and eceee workshop on systems in ecodesign 17 June 2021 16 Ecodesign and Energy Label working plan? Sustainable Products Initiative? EPBD and EED revisions?
  23. 23. Thank you | Presentation title and date 17 Report available at: https://help.leonardo-energy.org/hc/en-us/articles/360020752319--Cu0274-A-review-of-systems- approaches-in-Ecodesign-and-Energy-Labelling-report Cable review report at: https://help.leonardo-energy.org/hc/en-us/articles/360020746299-Potential-Ecodesign-regulation-for- economic-cable-conductor-sizing-in-buildings
  24. 24. Transforming product efficiency policy into system efficiency policy eceee – European Copper Institute Towards a systems approach in Ecodesign and Labelling: How to make a political ambition a reality? 17 June 2021 Hans-Paul Siderius Netherlands Enterprise Agency
  25. 25. What do you need for energy efficiency measures? 2 • Scope • Addressee(s) • Efficiency metrics and requirements • Test methods for verification and compliance
  26. 26. What is a system? 3 General definition: a regular interacting or interdependent group of items forming a unified whole (an entity made of several parts) Definition for systems policy: a functional unit that consists of two or more physical parts that need to be assembled at the location where the system is used.
  27. 27. Are systems included in ecodesign and energy labelling? 4 • Ecodesign defines a product as: any good that has an impact on energy consumption during use which is placed on the market and/or put into service. (Note that a good can consist of several physical units) • Placing on the market: product produced in a factory and installed at the end-user. • Putting into service: parts (produced in a factory) are assembled (and installed) on location at the end-user. • Energy labelling regulation defines a system as: a combination of several goods which when put together perform a specific function in an expected environment and of which the energy efficiency can then be determined as a single entity.
  28. 28. Classification of systems 5
  29. 29. Main challenges in regulating systems 6 • Assessing systems • Checking compliance: - Practical aspects: can addressees be identified, testing on location, reproducible results? - Regulatory powers: may be limited related to the scope, territorial jurisdiction or powers of market surveillance authorities
  30. 30. Approaches in assessing systems 7 • Black box: test the system like a product • Modular: test parts and combine the results • Procedural: “quality management” of (sizing,) assembly and installation • Statistical: monitoring; measurement of energy consumption and performance when the system is in use • Modelling: mathematical model of parts of the system, or scale model
  31. 31. Mapping systems and regulatory solutions 8 System class Main elements of energy efficiency measures Scope & addressees Efficiency metrics & requirements Verification & test methods ① Manufacturers of (parts of) the system. Efficiency of the parts and of the system. Measurements on the parts of the system; modelling to provide results for the system (in a variety of usage conditions). ② Manufacturers of the parts. Efficiency of the parts. Measurements on the parts. ③ Manufacturers of the identical and/or critical parts of the system. Assemblers/installers of the system. Efficiency of the (identical/critical) parts. Efficiency of the system as assembled and installed. Measurements on the (identical/critical) parts. Modelling to calculate system efficiency as assembled and installed. ④ Manufacturers of the parts. Assemblers/installers of the system. Efficiency of the parts. Quality (control) of the assembly/installation. Measurements on the parts. Check on the quality (control) of the assembly/installation. ⑤ Assemblers/installers of the system. Quality (control) of the assembly/installation. Check on the quality (control) of the assembly/installation.
  32. 32. Outlook - recommendations 9 • Estimate the savings potential. • When assembly has a large impact: - Include assembler as addressee and focus on quality of the assembly (quality management). - Include (regulatory) option to regulate standardization of the assembly. • For quality control look at approaches used in buildings. • Use modelling in the verification of systems if the variety in conditions and systems is large: - Include the model in the regulation. - Indicate how third party calculations or simulations are to be verified.
  33. 33. Thank your for your attention. Questions? hans-paul.siderius@rvo.nl 10
  34. 34. Energy Workshop "Towards a systems approach in Ecodesign and Energy Labelling“ Exchange of views 17 June 2021 Ronald Piers de Raveschoot Policy officer DG ENER, B.3.
  35. 35. Energy Reminder: Ecodesign legal basis ➢ Article 114 of the TFEU – Objective: functioning of the internal market / free movement of goods ➢ Approximation / harmonisation => Consistency of laws, regulations, standards and practices, so that the same rules will apply to businesses that operate in more than one member state ➢ Ordinary procedure : Legislative proposal from the Commission => Adoption by legislator (EP + Council) ➢ The act may foresee that the Commission adopts implementing measures
  36. 36. Energy • Consequences: The rules have to be met when the regulated (individual) product is placed on the EU market, i.e. when it is « made available » the first time. • « Blue guide » says • Already Manufactured • An offer or an agreement between the parties for the transfer of ownership. Normally the EU manufactuer or the importer are responsible. Ecodesign also includes « putting into service ». It is a different moment. Whatever comes first. => Applies e.g. when the ensuer buys the components separately and puts them into service => he is the manufacturer => conformity assessment, Declaration of conformity and CE marking.
  37. 37. Energy • What do we mean by systems approach ? • Look at the efficiency of « complex / extended products », e.g. pump + motor + VSD • Look how well the (extended) product is suited to the system with which it interacts, e.g. proper sizing of a fan. • Improve the energy efficiency and the system design Increasing beenfits Increasing complexity
  38. 38. Energy • Some EU experiences ❖ Heating/water heating package label • To be delivered by the installer who puts the components together • Mitagated experience ➢ Difficulties of enforcement ➢ Not know the the public and installers in general • => Decided to give it more time, try to simplify (e.g. IT tool collecting data from EPREL)
  39. 39. Energy • Solar panels • State of Play: IA ongoing => CF September • Ecodesign: PV Modules & inverters • Energy Label: PV module + Installer label for the system: module + inverter + cabling + shadows, inclination + orientation, = with the offer. • Discussion points: ➢ Enforcement difficulties ➢ Influence of climate? ➢ Influence of orientation?
  40. 40. Energy Challenges (1) • Instead of product manufacturer, the responsible person is often an installer who puts the extended product together: this is a much broader range of actors, more difficult to identify, to inform, to train, to survey, etc. No or little representation. • Less efficient inspections and more demanding for the limited MSAs resources: verification can only take place installation by installation, instead of model by model (one model can represent millions of products placed on the market) • Some MSAs do not have the legal powers to visit the installations • How can MSAs be aware of the existence of new installations in the field? • How to measure efficiency on site (no laboratory conditions, instruments, legal value…) ?
  41. 41. Energy Challenges (2) • Putting into service is taking place at given moment, after which the requirements do not apply. How can the MSA be informed and be present at that very moment ? • Consequences for non-compliance: once installed and put into service, the “illegal” product cannot be removed from the market any more. Can a MSA stop an entire industrial installation because a pump is not compliant? • Legal barrier : the Regulation specifies that « verification can be achieved directly on the product or on the basis of the technical documentation” • Multiplicity of actors in complex projects: Difficulty to find ‘one’ responsible in case of non-compliance
  42. 42. Energy Design / engineering office Multiplicity of actors General contractor Subcontractor 1: electrical installation Subcontractor 2: mechanical installation Subcontractor 3: hydraulic part Supplier 1: pump Supplier 1: motor Supplier 3: VSD Client Enduser
  43. 43. Energy Review study of water pumps : proposed approach • Current scope: ‘water pump’ = component = bare shaft pump = hydraulic part of a pump  Efficiency measured as MEI (Minimum Efficiency Index) • The extended product = hydraulic part + motor (+ VSD if any) = ‘water pump unit’  Criterion = EEI (Energy efficiency index) Pump Bare shaft pump Transmission e.g. coupling Electric Motor Electric Motor Desired work Mains Hydraulic circuit System beyond the pump unit Extended product (‘water pump unit’ – EEI) (VSD) Current scope (‘water pump’ – MEI)
  44. 44. Energy How can we save energy in variable flow applications ? VSD Mains Pump Pump Coupling Electric Motor Electric Motor Desired work Hydraulic circuit VSD, motor at reduced speed Desired flow and pressure Same MEI => High EEI => Low EEI (60%) Situation 1 (traditional, with throttle valve) Situation 2 (with VSD) Pump Pump Coupling Electric Motor Electric Motor Desired work Mains Hydraulic circuit No VSD, motor at full speed Valve Desired flow, high pressure Desired flow and pressure Destroyed energy Energy saved in the system
  45. 45. Energy 44% 35% 15% 6%
  46. 46. Energy • We consider using EPA for pumps for which there is a clear benefit of using a VSD, i.e. for single stage pumps and booster sets • We consider keeping the current approach (MEI) for pumps for which there is no or uncertain benefit of using a VSD (e.g. multistage pumps) • We keep MEI in other cases also (not mutually exclusive) • The EEI requirements are set so that a VSD is needed to meet the requirement => this enables considerable energy savings in the system beyond the pump itself, through: • Ensuring that load variations are achieved by adjusting motor speed rather than by destroying energy in throttling valves • The use of a load profile with several load points, as representative as possible of real pump operation • Reducing motor speed in case of oversized pump • Adjusting the pump to the required load point via motor speed control rather than via pump trimming How to generate more savings ?
  47. 47. The Extended Product Approach for water pumps Michael Könen – Europump 17.06.2021
  48. 48. 2 Source: Dr. Sönke Brodersen, KSB SE & Co. KGaA, October 2020 The Chronicle Michael Könen - Europump 17.06.2021
  49. 49. 3 MEI for water pumps (EN 16480) IE Classification for converters (IEC 61800-9-2) IE classes for motors (IEC 60034-30-1) PDS Standard (IEC 61800-9) IES classes for motor + CDM Product Approach – Components at the nominal duty Point Michael Könen - Europump 17.06.2021
  50. 50. 4 Pinput Phydraulic ηmot ηpump IE-Class MEI-Level Efficiency and demand – Regulatory levers Michael Könen - Europump 17.06.2021
  51. 51. 5 Pinput EEI-Level Phydraulic-demand Pno demand ηmot ηpump IE-Class MEI-Level Efficiency and demand – Regulatory levers Michael Könen - Europump 17.06.2021
  52. 52. THE Real Extended Product Approach 6 IE classes for CDM IE classes for motors MEI for water pumps Extended Product Approach (Europump EPA JWG) EEI determination for centrifugal pumps Michael Könen - Europump 17.06.2021
  53. 53. 7 The pump application Michael Könen - Europump 17.06.2021
  54. 54. 8 Summary Michael Könen - Europump 17.06.2021
  55. 55. Contact details: Michael Könen Tel. +49 6233 86-1893 E-mail: michael.koenen@ksb.com Thank you

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