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Integrated Home Systems - Chapter 3 - The System File

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A modern electrical installation, equipped with an integrated home system, must be transparent and user friendly for the end user. He/she does not need to know how and through what cables the system data communications are done. What is important for him/her is the function allocated to the pushbuttons and other components. He/she needs to know what happens when a certain pushbutton is pressed. Perhaps just one light goes on or off. However, with another pushbutton a number of lights may come on in a dimmed state, the roll-down shutters may be lowered, and the temperature can be set to comfort mode. In any case, the function of each pushbutton, motion detector, card reader, etc, must be clear right from the start.

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Integrated Home Systems - Chapter 3 - The System File

  1. 1. INTEGRATED HOME SYSTEMS COURSE CHAPTER 3: THE IHS SYSTEM FILE Guy Kasier September 2015 ECI Publication No Cu0228 Available from www.leonardo-energy.org
  2. 2. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page i Document Issue Control Sheet Document Title: Chapter 3: The IHS system file Publication No: Cu Issue: 02 Release: Public Author(s): Guy Kasier Reviewer(s): Noel Montrucchio Document History Issue Date Purpose 1 June 2008 Initial public release 2 September 2015 Revision 3 Disclaimer While this publication has been prepared with care, European Copper Institute and other contributors provide no warranty with regards to the content and shall not be liable for any direct, incidental or consequential damages that may result from the use of the information or the data contained. Copyright© European Copper Institute. Reproduction is authorized providing the material is unabridged and the source is acknowledged.
  3. 3. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page ii CONTENTS 1. Introduction................................................................................................................................................ 1 2. Definition of the problem ........................................................................................................................... 2 2.1. The architect’s drawings..................................................................................................................................2 2.2. Addition of an IHS system pushbutton............................................................................................................2 3. Drawing with a computer ........................................................................................................................... 4 3.1. Using layers......................................................................................................................................................4 3.2. Symbols............................................................................................................................................................5 4. The integrated home system file................................................................................................................. 8 4.1. Collecting information .....................................................................................................................................8 4.2. The order of the work......................................................................................................................................8 4.3. Drawing the floor plans ...................................................................................................................................8 4.3.1. The layer for the lights ...................................................................................................................8 4.3.2. The power sockets layer.................................................................................................................9 4.3.3. The motors layer ..........................................................................................................................10 4.3.4. The other consumers....................................................................................................................11 4.3.5. Adding a second code...................................................................................................................11 4.3.6. The pushbuttons ..........................................................................................................................12 4.3.7. The touch panels ..........................................................................................................................13 4.3.8. The motion detectors...................................................................................................................13 4.3.9. The light sensors...........................................................................................................................14 4.3.10. The temperature sensors ...........................................................................................................14 4.3.11. Other sensors and subsystems...................................................................................................14 4.4. The spreadsheets...........................................................................................................................................15 4.4.1. The list of consumers ...................................................................................................................15 4.4.2. The list of pushbuttons.................................................................................................................17 4.4.3. Other lists .....................................................................................................................................19 4.4.4. The connection of the pushbuttons .............................................................................................19 4.5. Additional drawings.......................................................................................................................................21 4.6. The single-line diagram..................................................................................................................................22 4.6.1. Overvoltage protection ................................................................................................................23
  4. 4. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page iii 4.6.2. The IHS relays ...............................................................................................................................23 4.6.3. Dimmers .......................................................................................................................................24 4.6.4. Motors..........................................................................................................................................25 4.7. Drawing of the distribution box.....................................................................................................................26 4.8. Advantages of the IHS system file for the installer........................................................................................26
  5. 5. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 1 1. INTRODUCTION A modern electrical installation, equipped with an Integrated Home System (IHS), must be user friendly and transparent for the end user. The user does not need to know how and through what cables the system data communications are carried out. What is important for them is the function allocated to the pushbuttons and other components. They simply need to know what happens when a certain pushbutton is pressed. Perhaps just one light goes on or off. However, with another pushbutton a number of lights may come on in a dimmed state, the roll-down shutters may be lowered, and the temperature can be set to comfort mode. In any case, the function of each pushbutton, motion detector, card reader, et cetera, must be clear and intuitive right from the start. IHS systems can then be remarkably easy for the end user. The same thing cannot be said for the installer. An IHS system presents them with a number of subsystems in the home. All kinds of connections are made to enhance integration. It is actually the very flexibility of an IHS system that makes it difficult to set out the required information on paper. Nevertheless, it is very important to do so. Every installed IHS system must be accompanied by a file. This file will not only be used for the acceptance, but also as a working instrument for the installer. A working instrument will certainly prove its worth during installation and be equally useful during after-sales service. A number of meetings with the customer are often required before a useful file can be drawn up. As an installer, you have to know what the customer will do with their IHS system. What functions do they want? This aspect forms part of the sales meeting. Please refer to Chapter 2 of this course for useful information and guidelines for conducting a successful sales meeting. The method that we present here for drawing up and using an IHS system file is only one of many possible methods. However the method presented here can easily be adapted to your own working method, and to the specific IHS system in question. In this part of the IHS course, we only want to give an example of how it can be done. You can of course adapt it to turn it into your own unique working instrument.
  6. 6. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 2 2. DEFINITION OF THE PROBLEM 2.1. THE ARCHITECT’S DRAWINGS When the architect, generally together with the customer, has determined where the consumers and the operating points have to go for a traditional electrical installation, the architect then places the symbols on the floor plan. The same approach is applicable for an IHS system. The architect generally uses the traditional symbols and the traditional method. Let’s take a look at how the architect does this. Figure 1: An architect’s plan. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) This simple plan shows four consumers: a lighting group above the dining table, a lighting group above the lounge area, a power socket in the lounge area and a power socket in the dining area. Switches have been drawn in at the entrance to the kitchen and at the door to the vestibule. The curved lines that the architect has drawn between the switches and consumers indicate which consumers they will operate. The curved lines do not indicate the electrical cables, but rather the relationship between one or more operating elements (switches) and one or more consumers (in this case lights and power sockets). We thus see in the above drawing that there is a switch that will operate the power socket in the dining area, there are two switches that operate the lighting group above the dining table, and there are two switches that operate the lighting group above the lounge area. There is also a switch to operate the power socket in the lounge area. These drawings give the installer the information needed to install a traditional system. They tell the installer where the consumers and operating components are and what functions they will have. 2.2. ADDITION OF AN IHS SYSTEM PUSHBUTTON Let’s now assume that we fit an IHS pushbutton at the door to the vestibule. The function of this switch is to switch off all consumers when we go out of the living room into the vestibule.
  7. 7. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 3 Figure 2: We have also fitted an all off switch for the living room. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) In order to proceed in the same manner as the architect, we have connected the pushbutton to all of the consumers that it will switch off with curved lines. However, it immediately becomes clear that we have a problem. First of all there is too much to look at and our drawing is full of curved lines. It is a mishmash of lines that makes the drawing unusable. Furthermore, the drawing does not clearly show the function of the pushbutton. We said that it must switch off all consumers that are on, but the drawing does not show this. It could also be an all on switch or a local mood switch. It is clear that we cannot produce useful drawings in this way for IHS systems.
  8. 8. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 4 3. DRAWING WITH A COMPUTER We will have to make many drawings for an IHS system file. Because of their complexity, it is definitely advisable to produce them with a good drawing program. Some learning time will be required in the early stages, but you will soon discover that it is far quicker to produce drawings by computer than to draw them manually. Furthermore, there are many other benefits. You might make a mistake. You do not have to redo the entire drawing to correct it. And each printout gives a nice clean result. The choice of drawing program is entirely up to you. Certain professional CAD programs are very expensive and have many more functions than all but a very few individuals will ever use. You can also purchase other less comprehensive programs that may very well suit your needs at a far more attractive price. When making your choice, it is important to select a program that can read Autocad files. These files end with the extensions DWG or DXF. This is because most architects have drawing programs that can convert to this standard. Then you will not have to create a floor plan yourself with the walls, windows and doors. You can just ask the architect for a DXF or DWG file and you can immediately start putting in electrical symbols. 3.1. USING LAYERS Every CAD program can work with layers. We can thus put certain components of the drawing in a separate layer. Layers can be made visible or invisible. In order to increase the clarity of our drawings, we will place every subsystem or component in a separate layer. These layers can also be printed separately. It provides us with easy-to-read drawings. We can further increase the clarity of our drawings by using a separate color in each layer. One color for the lights, another color for the power sockets, and yet another for the roll-down shutter motors. Figure 3: A drawing showing all subsystems is cluttered and essentially unusable. (Source illustration: E&D Systems)
  9. 9. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 5 Figure 4: The layers for the walls, furniture and lights are combined on this drawing. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) Figure 5: The same drawing as above, but with the power sockets layer instead of the lights. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 3.2. SYMBOLS We use standard symbols to draw the floor plan and the single-line diagram. However, there is a problem. There is not a symbol in the standard symbols list for several of the components found in an IHS system. For certain symbols, we took our inspiration from the symbols library of the KNX system. The general symbol for an actuator is a square in which, if desired, an alphanumeric listing can be placed. On the left of or below the square another rectangle is drawn in which a double arrow is placed. This indicates that it is a bus-controlled device.
  10. 10. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 6 Figure 6: On the left, the general symbol for an actuator of the IHS system. On the right we see different versions of actuators. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 1. General symbol for actuator 2. Single 10 A relay 3. 3-position relay for controlling roller-shutter motors 4. Bus -controlled dimmer 5. 0-10 V controlled dimmer An oblique stroke is placed in the square for the sensors and interfaces. Figure 7: On the left, the general symbol for a sensor of the IHS system. On the right we see different versions of sensors, all of them bus-controlled. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 1. General symbol for sensor 2. Bus -controlled sensor module with n-number pushbuttons 3.Buss controlled PIR (passive infrared) sensor 4. Analog light sensor 5. Analog temperature sensor Combined actuator/sensor devices are also available. Some manufacturers decentralize their actuators and may or may not provide them with pushbuttons, temperature sensors, clocks, motion detectors, et cetera.
  11. 11. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 7 Figure 8: Example of a combined device, consisting of a single-pole relay (actuator) and 4 pushbuttons (sensors). (Source illustration: E&D Systems) Sometimes a module can also contain several actuators or sensors. Figure 9: This bus-controlled device has 4 pushbuttons and an IR receiver. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) In certain cases, an IHS system can also use modules that are not bus-controlled. In that event, the rectangle with the double arrow is omitted for the symbol. Figure 10: Example of a non-bus-controlled operating point with n-number pushbuttons. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) In Figure 10 the pushbuttons are connected to an input module of the IHS system. The input module is then connected to the bus system.
  12. 12. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 8 4. THE INTEGRATED HOME SYSTEM FILE For the benefit of the customer, but above all for our own benefit, we will produce an IHS file for each IHS installation. On the one hand, this file will consist of drawings and on the other spreadsheets. The combination of the two will enable us to know what function each pushbutton or sensor performs, but also to which input a pushbutton is connected and to which output of the IHS system a consumer is connected. The number of mounting boxes and how they must be positioned (horizontally or vertically) are also included in this file. We also examine how we can draw the single-line diagram. 4.1. COLLECTING INFORMATION In many cases we will receive a plan from the architect that already shows where the consumers are. If this is not the case, then you have to go over the plan together with the customer and make the necessary indications. In this discussion, consumers and control elements are assigned a place on the plan. The functions of the control elements can also be determined (see Chapter 2 of this course). The correct location of the lights will in certain cases only be clear after a thorough lighting study. As the aim of an IHS system is to integrate as many subsystems as possible, we will probably also have to contact other people such as the heating installer, the garage door and gate installer, the alarm installer, the people for the audio distribution system, et cetera. 4.2. THE ORDER OF THE WORK Once the data from the sales discussion is in hand, we can begin to draw as many consumers as possible (in separate layers) on the floor plans. We also add a code. A consumer list is then produced. In this list, every consumer is not only assigned a name that is clear to all, but has a note with the associated code as well. In a second phase, we add operating points, motion detectors, touch panels, touchscreens, temperature sensors, light sensors, et cetera to the drawings and give them a code. The list of operating points and pushbuttons is then produced. At this point, we determine how many pushbuttons there are at each operating point. We also assign each pushbutton a function and describe with which consumers this function takes place. We will produce a list of the functions for each pushbutton of a touch panel, for the motion detectors and for the touchscreens in the same way. Our next step is to make a list for the connection of the pushbuttons. This is quickly done and makes work on site much easier. Finally we draw the single-line diagram and the floor plans for the associated networks (loudspeakers, telephony, data, et cetera). 4.3. DRAWING THE FLOOR PLANS After we have received the digital floor plan from the architect, or after we have drawn the floor plan ourselves, we will first draw in the symbols for the consumers. We do this in separate layers. Then we will put all the sensors of the installation onto the drawing. 4.3.1. THE LAYER FOR THE LIGHTS Since the bulk of the consumers in most homes are the lights, we will start with them. Every light is drawn on the floor plan and given a code. When the light is connected to a relay, the code starts with the letter R, followed by a figure. The figure designates the output of our IHS system that the light is connected to. In the drawing below, you can see four lights above the table that have the code R64. These four lights can only be switched on and off (relay driven) and they are connected to relay number 64 of the IHS system. These four
  13. 13. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 9 lights will therefore always go on and off together. They may be connected to each other in parallel. The wall light on the outside wall will be connected to relay number 2 of the system. Figure 11: Every light is given a code that immediately provides us with a great deal of information. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) If lights are connected to a dimmer, the code starts with the letter D, followed by a figure. Here too, the figure indicates the number of the dimmer that the light is connected to. We will also use the same figures later in the software. This means that when we want to program a certain light, we can easily find it in the software. 4.3.2. THE POWER SOCKETS LAYER In many cases, not all power sockets in the home will be controlled by the IHS system. Such controls are generally limited to a few power sockets such as the ones for the coffee machine, the iron, a few non-fixed light fittings, outdoor power sockets, the kitchen boiler, et cetera. In order to make it absolutely clear which power sockets are controlled (switched or dimmed) and which are not, we put them on the drawing in different colors. The drawing below shows the power sockets that are not controlled by the IHS system in blue. The controlled power sockets are in red. When on site, we can immediately see when a cable has to be laid directly to the fuse box containing the relays or dimmers for the red power socket. For the controlled power sockets, we enter a code in the same way as for the lights: an R or a D followed by a number. In the drawing below, the red power socket will be controlled by dimmer 13.
  14. 14. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 10 Figure 12: We can readily see whether or not it is a controlled power socket just by looking at the color. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 4.3.3. THE MOTORS LAYER Figure 13: The motors are also given a code. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) The new layer that we create is for the motors that can operate in either direction: roller-shutter motors, sunblinds, curtain motors, garage door motors, gate motors, et cetera. In most cases the various IHS systems have a separate motor output module in their range. If they do, then we can start the motor code with the letter M, again followed by a number. In the other cases the motors will have to be connected to two relay outputs of the IHS system. In such a case, every motor will have two codes, starting with an R followed by a number. In general practice, motors for the garage door and gates can present a problem for us. These motors generally have an intelligent remote control and we cannot access the wires of the motor. Everything is built into a motor box, an enclosed unit. A cable with a plug must be plugged into a power socket for the supply. However, it is often possible to control the motor with pulses. It is then useful to have two pulses available.
  15. 15. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 11 One pulse for up and another pulse for down. In this way we know what to do with operating the garage door remotely as well. The cables to be used are then immediately drawn in the above drawing. M1, M2 and M8 are ordinary motors that operate in both directions. They can be connected to ordinary 230V cabling. We need four wires: common, turn left, turn right, and the earth. M9 is the motor box for the garage door. Here we use a thin-section signal cable to control the door. A power socket will be drawn in the power sockets layer at the same location to ensure a supply to the motor box. The position on the drawing is important. M1 is drawn on the outside wall of the terrace. This is the motor for the sunblind. M2 is also drawn on the same wall, but at the kitchen window. This motor will operate a roll- down shutter. If we draw the symbol on the inside of the window, it will be a curtain control. 4.3.4. THE OTHER CONSUMERS Figure 14: The electric valves for the heating control also have a code, designating the relay they are connected to. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) Analogous to the drawings that we did for the lights, power sockets and motors, we also make separate layers for all other consumers. For example the electric oven, the electric heating or the valves for the central heating, the fans for the toilet and the bathroom, the garden sprinkler, the circulation pump for the hot tap water, et cetera. 4.3.5. ADDING A SECOND CODE To have a clear connection between the floor plans and the single-wire diagram, each consumer (whether or not controlled by the IHS system) must be given a code. For consumers controlled by the IHS system, this means a second code that must be added. This second code tells us to which circuit of the electrical installation the consumer is connected. Let us take a look at an example. Figure 15: Not only the red, controlled power socket, but also all other power sockets (not controlled by IHS) are given a code that indicates to which circuit of the installation they are connected. (Source illustration: E&D Systems)
  16. 16. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 12 The controlled power socket R12 in the above drawing is given a second code. Such codes are also found with the non-controlled power sockets. In a classic installation, we normally begin such a code with a letter, followed by a number. A5 therefore means circuit A, fifth position. However, it may be that we have more circuits than there are letters in the alphabet. In that case it is advisable to begin the code with a number. The first number can then stand for the distribution board. For example, a code for a device placed in distribution board no. 1 begins with the number 1. The second number in the code indicates the number of the earth-leakage breaker in this distribution board. The first earth-leakage breaker (300 mA) is given number 1. The next one (30 mA) is numbered 2. Only then does a letter appear in the code to indicate the device. Lastly there is another number to indicate the order on the circuit. The code 11E1, belonging to our controlled power socket in Figure 15, thus means: this power socket is connected in fuse box 1 to the first earth-leakage breaker (300 mA), and to device E, first position. In Figure 15 we can also see that power sockets 11D1, 11D2, 11D3, 11D4 and 11D5 belong to circuit D in the first distribution board and after the first earth-leakage breaker. Since these are non-controlled power sockets, they will be connected directly to each other on installation. Just one feeder cable runs from distribution board 1 to this power socket circuit. 4.3.6. THE PUSHBUTTONS With the pushbuttons we come up alongside the sensors. We will put a separate layer in the drawing for them as well. The first layer that we add is the one for the voltage-free pushbuttons. They are pushbuttons of any brand that do not contain electronic components, and which are connected to an input module of the IHS system. Figure 16: Operating points with pushbuttons at the door, next to the bed and the window. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) In the master bedroom we have drawn four operating points. For this we used the symbol for n-number pushbuttons. An operating point is defined here as a place where one or more pushbuttons are installed under the same cover plate. The correct number of pushbuttons is now not an important consideration here. As an IHS system is flexible, it may be that today we decide that three pushbuttons will be put at the door, but tomorrow we decide on four or only two. So as not to have to change our drawing each time (work time), we always use the same symbol for an operating point. How many pushbuttons are at a certain operating point,
  17. 17. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 13 and what function they will have, will not be shown in the drawing but later on in a spreadsheet. At every operating point we also place a code. It can start with the letter S for switch for example, followed by a unique number. We could also use PB (pushbuttons) or OP (Operating Point), but that would mean having to key in an extra letter each time, while the intention is to save ourselves as much work as possible. 4.3.7. THE TOUCH PANELS Many IHS producers have their own brand-dependent operating panels with one or more buttons. However, they are not voltage-free contacts. There are electronic components behind or in the panel. Such a touch panel is generally connected to the IHS system via a bus cable. They are sometimes equipped with an internal buzzer, an infrared receiver, a temperature sensor, LED indication and a display. We also make a separate layer for the touch panels. And of course we add a unique code, this time with the letters TP (touch panel), followed by a figure. Figure 17: A touch panel next to the TV in the bedroom. This allows operations from the bed with the infrared remote control. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 4.3.8. THE MOTION DETECTORS Sensors also include motion detectors. We also give them a place on the plan and give them a code, starting with the letters MD (motion detector) and followed by a figure. Figure 18: The motion detectors at the garage door, the terrace, the front door and front garden. (Source illustration: E&D Systems)
  18. 18. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 14 4.3.9. THE LIGHT SENSORS Light sensors measure the quantity of incident light in order to automatically control the sunblinds for example. For the light sensors the code starts with LS (light sensor). Figure 19: The light sensor on the terrace provides information on the quantity of outside light. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 4.3.10. THE TEMPERATURE SENSORS Electronic temperature sensors will be used to measure the room temperature. The code starts with the letters TS (temperature sensor). Figure 20: The temperature sensors are also shown in the drawing. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 4.3.11. OTHER SENSORS AND SUBSYSTEMS In the same way we can also create layers for any other sensors such as humidity sensors, window and door contacts, floor contacts, point probes for the rainwater drain, proximity readers, et cetera.
  19. 19. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 15 Figure 21: The layer for the access control proximity readers. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) To complete the drawing work we can also create layers for other subsystems for which we will install the cabling. Examples of devices for such subsystems include the entry phones, videophones, telephones, television and radio connections, the computer network, the audio distribution system, the alarm system, et cetera. Figure 22: Telephones and videophones are also shown on the drawings. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 4.4. THE SPREADSHEETS We will use spreadsheets in order to ensure we make a complete usable file. We make a number of spreadsheets for the IHS file. All spreadsheets have a direct relationship with the drawings. 4.4.1. THE LIST OF CONSUMERS The initial list that we produce is for the consumers such as the lights, motors, electric valves, et cetera. In the floor plans, we gave every consumer a code. However, if we use these codes in meetings with the client or architect, they will probably not know what we are talking about. The code R2 means nothing to them, but they do indeed understand the description light point terrace. It also provides a clearer description of the consumers for programming the IHS system. T3 T4
  20. 20. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 16 In the list of consumers, we establish the relationship between an understandable description of a consumer and the relay, dimmer or motor output of the IHS system that will control this consumer. In other words, a relationship is established between the description and the code that we used on the drawings. Figure 23: Bathroom fan tells us much more than the code R11. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) The list consists of six columns. The first column contains a description of the consumer. Column two contains its code if it is a consumer connected to a relay. The codes of the consumers that are connected to a motor output or a dimmer output are put in columns three and four respectively. In larger installations it is usual to fit a number of fuse boxes in the home: for example one in an equipment room, one in the attic and one in the garden pavilion. We give each fuse box a number. We note this number alongside each consumer in column five of the list. In this way we can see which fuse box the consumer has to be connected to during the installation Figure 24: De lijst van de motoren. (Source illustration: E&D Systems)
  21. 21. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 17 Figure 25: The dimmers can also be given their own column. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) For ease of installation, and in order not have to reinvent the wheel too much during the installation (you want to get on with the work), in the last column we note which cable or wires (in a conduit) must be used for the respective consumers. In this way the employees who install the cables are not in doubt and can correctly do the installation quickly because all the thinking has already been done. Everything is set out on paper. Finally, note that the above drawings contain some colored (green) rows. Depending upon the number of outputs on the output modules used, these lines visually indicate how many output modules are used. In the above examples, the consumers R1 to R8 inclusive are connected to a relay output module. The consumers R9 to R16 inclusive are connected to a second output module. Two motor output modules are also used that can each control four motors. The output modules for controlling the dimmers each have eight outputs. On the second dimmer control card we only use D9 to D13. For the time being, we thus have three surplus dimmer outputs. 4.4.2. THE LIST OF PUSHBUTTONS When doing the floor plans, we drew a layer for the pushbutton operating points. Wherever one or more pushbuttons are installed under the same cover plate we drew the symbol with n-number pushbuttons on this drawing, together with a code starting with the letter S followed by a number. Figure 26: The drawing with the pushbutton operating points. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) This drawing only shows where the operating points are located. What we did not want, and could not do, was to show how many pushbuttons there will be at a certain operating point and what functions these pushbuttons will have. So it is now time to produce the list of pushbuttons. With an IHS system, the installer has to go through two types of thought processes: the creative and the analytical. The creative thinking determines what will be done with the IHS system; that is, what IHS functions
  22. 22. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 18 will be implemented. The analytical thinking consists of converting this into the software program or the programming operations of the IHS system. All too often we forget to do the first and then encounter problems when it comes to the programming. It is advisable to separate the two types of thinking from one another, and to do them at different times; first the creative work and only then the analytical work. One way of setting the creative work out on paper is to use the list of pushbuttons shown below. Figure 27: This spreadsheet specifies the function for each pushbutton. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) In the first column we note the codes of the operating points. In our example we can see operating points S1, S2 and S3. The second column specifies the number of pushbuttons for each operating point. In our example we see that there is only one pushbutton at operating point S1. Operating point S2 contains four pushbuttons, while at operating point S3 there will be room for eight pushbuttons. Depending upon the possibilities of the IHS system, we provide one or more lines for each pushbutton. There are two lines in the example above. The IHS system used here is able to allocate two independent functions to a pushbutton depending upon whether it is pressed for a short period (< 1 sec.) or long period (> 1.5 sec.) by the user. We provide a short press row and a long press row for each pushbutton. There then follows an entire series of narrow columns under the heading Function. Each column represents a possible function of the IHS system. For example, we first see the ON/OFF Toggle function, but also dimmer functions, timed functions, general moods and even audio functions. As an installer, you will have to adapt these columns to the IHS system you are working on. The next three columns contain the codes of the relays, dimmers and motors concerned. Finally there is the description column. This specifies the purpose of the function in a few words.
  23. 23. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 19 Let’s look at an example: - We can see that four pushbuttons have been installed at operating point S2. When there is a short press on pushbutton 1, it toggles (there is a cross in the function column concerned) relay R53 (see relay column). Because the code R53 does not by itself tell us a lot, we can see in the description column that it is the central light point of the entrance. - A long press on pushbutton 1 of the same operating point toggles R52, the light on the vestibule wall. - A short press on pushbutton 2 operates a timed function for the light on the ground floor stairs. When we press the pushbutton, the light comes on and automatically switches off after five minutes or other preset time (see description). - Because it is not helpful for the light to continually go off while cleaning the stairs, a long press on pushbutton 2 operates a toggle function for the same light R6. The light will then stay on until we give the same button another long press. - We do something similar with pushbutton 3. A short press on this button will switch on the outside front door lighting for five minutes. Somebody can then leave the house without stepping out into the dark. - If we intend to receive a visitor at some unknown point, we may want the front door light to stay on. This can be done with the toggle function for R5. - Finally a short press on pushbutton 4 does not operate any function. When we give the same button a long press, a general mood is activated whereby all the consumers in the home go off, the roll-down shutters are raised if it is daytime or lowered if it is dark, and in the meantime the activity simulation is activated. We can leave the home with peace of mind. 4.4.3. OTHER LISTS Analogous to the lists of pushbuttons, we also make up lists for all other sensors that have to perform an action. For example, the buttons on the touch panels, the motion detectors, the infrared beam in the drive, the sensor for water detection, the humidity and light sensors, the proximity reader, the door and window contacts, et cetera. 4.4.4. THE CONNECTION OF THE PUSHBUTTONS The pushbuttons that we discussed in point 4.4.2. are voltage-free pushbuttons of any brand that are connected in star formation to the input modules of the IHS system. These input modules are either situated in the distribution board or are located behind the pushbuttons in the mounting box in the wall. We produce a list for the installation and connection of these pushbuttons so that work on the site can continue uninterrupted.
  24. 24. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 20 Figure 28: This list enables the installer on the site to connect any pushbutton to the correct wire. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) The first and second columns correspond to the first two columns in the list of pushbuttons. The first column contains the codes of the operating points. The second column contains a row for each pushbutton. A mounting box has to be installed at each operating point. So that we do not have to rethink which mounting box (size) has to be installed and in what direction (horizontal or vertical) during the installation, we provide a third column containing this information. The above example uses Bticino mounting boxes E503 and E504. We thus see that an E503 mounting box has to be fitted at operating points S1 and S4. There is an E504 mounting box at the other operating points. If the standard European mounting boxes are used, we can also note it in column three in the form of a figure, followed by the letter H or V. The figure indicates the number of combined mounting boxes, while the direction in which they are fitted (horizontal or vertical) is specified by the letter. Example: 2H stands for two combined mounting boxes in a horizontal position, while 3V stands for three mounting boxes below one another. Figure 29: We can even use this method for round mounting boxes on hollow walls. For the operating point on the left of the photo we note the code 3V (3 x vertical) in column three, while the right-hand combination is noted as 2H (2 x horizontal). (Source illustration: IPW)
  25. 25. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 21 The pushbuttons are connected in star formation (making use of a common wire) to the fuse box. In our case we use an SVV cable. This cable consists of a number of separate insulated and colored copper conductors of 0.8 mm², surrounded by a grey outer sheath. The table in Figure 28 shows the use of the green colored horizontal lines. All operating points located between two consecutive green lines are connected with the same cable. We note the type of cable in column seven: SVV 4x0.8 or SVV 16x0.8, a cable with 4 or 16 conductors respectively. We provide an identification label at the point where these cables go into the fuse box. In the above list we see that the first cable (SVV 4x0.8) has the label A1 and only goes from the fuse box to operating point S1 (there is a green line below it). The cable with the label A2 (SVV 16x0.8) goes from the fuse box to operating point S2, and from there to operating point S3. The next cable (A3) goes to operating points S4, S5 and S6. Column four shows that the white wire of the cables will always be used as the common wire for all pushbuttons. Furthermore, each pushbutton is given a unique wire in column five. By drawing up this list beforehand, you do not waste time on site noting which wire has been connected to which pushbutton. Few mistakes are made as a result. Finally, we would also like to know which input of the IHS system a pushbutton is connected to. This is indicated in the last two columns. In the penultimate column we note the number of the input module. In the last column we note the input of the input module to which the relevant pushbutton is connected. Depending on the IHS system concerned, we can also make a modification here. We do not need to note wire colors for all systems that use BUS cabling and pushbutton modules that are directly connected to it. It is sufficient to note the address of the module or the pushbuttons 4.5. ADDITIONAL DRAWINGS A number of additional drawings also have to be produced. However, these drawings can be used on any site. First of all, there is the drawing to show where a certain pushbutton is installed at an operating point. If we have to connect four pushbuttons under one cover plate, which pushbutton is then No. 1, 2, 3 of 4? The drawing below makes this clear. This drawing has been produced for use with Bticino pushbuttons. If another brand of pushbutton is used (Berker, Gira, Jung, Legrand, Lithoss, Merten, Niko, Peha, Siemens, Simon, et cetera) an appropriate drawing will of course have to be produced with a number of possible combinations. Figure 30: An example of possible arrangements for Bticino pushbuttons. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 45 5 6 1 2 3 4 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 56 6 67 7 8 BTicino 503 503 504504504 503
  26. 26. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 22 The top two rows show a few options for the use of an E503 mounting box. In the bottom two rows we see a few options in combination with an E504 mounting box. Note that both full size and half size pushbuttons have been used. Every cable to the pushbutton locations is given a label in the table for the connection of the pushbuttons (A1, A2, et cetera). In order to proceed in an orderly manner, it is better to connect the wires of these cables to terminal blocks. In order to save space in the fuse box, we use double layered terminal blocks. We use the following drawing for the correct connection of the colors. Figure 31: Connection of the SVV cables to the terminal block. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) We will place a number of these terminal blocks next to one another for the different cables in the fuse box. If we use the same order of colors for every cable, we can instantly see where a new cable starts each time, i.e. whenever there is a white wire. The above colors are only an example. They will have to be adapted to the colors in the cable used by the installer. 4.6. THE SINGLE-LINE DIAGRAM The purpose of a single-line diagram is to give a simplified presentation of the electrical installation on paper. In particular, all electrical equipment and components that are connected to the 230V network must be put on the single-line diagram. Components that operate on a very low safety voltage, such as the IHS pushbuttons, do not have to be drawn on the single-line diagram. There would be no point. The all off button would then have to be connected to all consumers, which would make our drawing cluttered. In general terms, the single- line diagram of an IHS system is similar to one for a traditional installation. Nevertheless there are some differences that we will look at here.
  27. 27. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 23 Figure 32: Example of a part of a single-line diagram. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 4.6.1. OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION It is not typical for an IHS system to have overvoltage protection. This oversight should be corrected. It is also a good idea to protect traditional electrical installations against overvoltage. Note that in an IHS system however, we have sensitive electronic (and sometimes expensive) components. It is thus better to take precautions and provide overvoltage protection. We can show this in the single-line diagram in the following way. Figure 33: The symbol for overvoltage protection. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 4.6.2. THE IHS RELAYS In contrast to a class installation, in an IHS installation a consumer is not switched by a switch, but normally by a relay. These relays are normally incorporated in a relay output module. This is why all relays of a single module are framed by a rectangle. They are inextricably connected. Most relay modules have single-pole relays.
  28. 28. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 24 Figure 34: Relay module, consisting of 8 relays and a bus connection. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) If consumers are double-pole switched, we provide a contactor. The single-pole relay of the IHS output module then switches the double-pole contactor. Figure 35: The top power socket of circuit 11E is switched by a two-pole contactor. This is controlled by relay R8 of the IHS system. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 4.6.3. DIMMERS Dimmers are generally not distributed around the home, but centralized in the fuse box. We use the symbol of a dimmer here. In order to indicate that it is not an ordinary dimmer, we draw a small square around it. We can use that symbol to indicate rail dimmers. Certain IHS systems also use dimmer packs. These are units that contain a number of dimmers. In such a case, a large rectangle is drawn around the dimmers that are in the dimmer pack.
  29. 29. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 25 Figure 36: Presentation of a 12-channel dimmer pack and a single dimmer. All dimmers in this drawing are controlled by a 0-10 V control and not directly by a bus system. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 4.6.4. MOTORS We can also use a separate symbol for the motors of roller-shutters, sunblinds, et cetera. IHS systems normally provide modules for controlling bi-directional motors. All relays of a single module are then framed by a rectangle. Figure 37: Here too, the number of the relay used is always indicated. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) In the above drawing, we see that the four relays that control the motors (when considered together) form a motor control module that is controlled by a bus connection.
  30. 30. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 26 4.7. DRAWING OF THE DISTRIBUTION BOX It can certainly be useful with larger installations to provide a sketch of the distribution board in which all components are allocated a place. Figure 38: Example of a drawn fuse box, equipped with an earth-leakage breaker, overvoltage protection, automatic breakers and various other types of IHS equipment. (Source illustration: E&D Systems) 4.8. ADVANTAGES OF THE IHS SYSTEM FILE FOR THE INSTALLER It will be clear that the production of a professional IHS system file will take some time. However, this time pays dividends during installation on site. A number of the benefits are set out below:  Time saved on site. If, when on site, you still need to think about how many pushbuttons there must be at a particular point and what function these pushbuttons will have to perform, then you are wasting time.  Time saved when installing pushbuttons. If such a method is not used, you will still have to write everything down on site. The color of a wire that is connected to a particular pushbutton must also be easily identified in the fuse box, without a so-called continuity test having to be carried out. O UT08aut obus O UT M O TO R 230V I NP08AN I NP16D TELint er f . DI M int er f . 2 3 0 F M L 2 4 F M L CTME12 C O A X T E S T h a g e r 4 0 A 3 0 m A N 2 0 A 2 0 A 2 0 A 2 0 A 1 6 A 1 6 A1 6 A1 6 A 6 A1 0 A 6 A 6 A 2 5 A 2 3 0 F M L 2 0 A 2 0 A 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N 12 34 56 78 O M R O N O UT08aut obus O UT08aut obus O UT08aut obus Po we r s u p p ly 1 2 V DC
  31. 31. Publication No Cu0228 Issue Date: September 2015 Page 27  Time saved when programming. Once the installation has been completed and has to be programmed, at that point you no longer want to be thinking about the function of a pushbutton. Everything is clearly written down in the tables.  Clarity. The printouts allow you to work with a comprehensive overall view of the installation. All details can easily be found.  Easily adaptable. A minor or major change must be made in the diagrams and tables. Changes can be quickly made and are clear.  Up-to-date information. In principle, the latest changes and modifications discussed must always be visible in the diagrams and tables. It is therefore a good idea to always include the date on drawings and tables.  Clear site instructions. When employees go to the site with plans and tables, they are armed with clear information. Mistakes are almost entirely excluded.  Indications on the plans and diagrams made by employees can easily and neatly be incorporated into the file.  Tidiness. Working in a tidy fashion has several positive side effects. Someone who can submit a tidy file will gain trust more readily than if a few scraps of paper are presented. As a secondary effect, it can boost your image. You are viewed as someone who will deliver quality.  The diagrams for the inspection are ready. Obviously the entire file does not need to be submitted for inspection. As the drawing work has already been done, a printout of the floor plans and the single- wire diagram can suffice.  Time saved in after-sales service. Once the property is occupied, if modifications and changes have to be made (hardware or software), you can fall back on a complete file. This means you do not waste valuable time having to investigate and test individual connections.  The customer gets a complete file. If you are unavailable, the customer still has the necessary information to have any modifications carried out by someone else. Obviously this point forms part of the sales agreement.

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