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Entrepreneurship in the energy transition

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Many new business models and types of entrepreneurs are emerging to accelerate the energy transition. We will share first findings on how these new business models look like and the new type of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial capabilities needed to operate successfully in the complex, uncertain energy transition, and of course reflect briefly on what this means for policy.

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Entrepreneurship in the energy transition

  1. 1. Speaker: Ruth Mourik Operating Agent Annex Energy Services Supporting Business Models and Systems Users TCP by the International Energy Agency Entrepreneurship in the Energy Transition
  2. 2. How do the business models used and entrepreneurial skills or capabilities explain the lack of uptake of new energy innovations? Intro
  3. 3. Servitisation transition in the energy sector
  4. 4. Servitisation transition in the energy sector
  5. 5. Match business model with product or service Different business model required to deliver products versus services
  6. 6. Servitisation transition in the energy sector Different dynamic capabilities required to deliver services Sensing Conceptualising Orchestrating Scaling
  7. 7. Recap
  8. 8. The research questions for this next phase were: • How do these innovative energy services scale up? • How are their business models and entrepreneurial journeys shaped by factors, especially by the specific characteristics of the energy transition? • How do these enterprising stakeholders deal with the system around them, and how are dynamic capabilities impacting on their journey? • And finally, what are system conditions that either limit or facilitate the flourishing of energy services? Research questions
  9. 9. Methodology • Long lists • Short Lists • Interviews with entrepreneurs focused on business model, dynamic capabilities and interaction with context • Interviews with system stakeholders • Literature review • Analysis
  10. 10. Case Studies Netherlands Ireland Sweden Australia A sustainable district case: Talis A community Virtual Power Plant case: Community Power Negnic: smart thermostat delivering flexibility services CONSORT Bruny Island microgrid An all-electric district case: Hoogdalem Solar Stream: EPC service related to PV roof space for businesses Smart Front: Upgrading façade, indoor climate and insulation in one go Yackadanda community microgrid A community Virtual Power Plant case: Loenen Veolia : Carbon Fund EPC service for Dublin Mater hospital Citizen-driven innovation platform that aims to create a climate friendly district: Hammersby Electricity Monash University Campus microgrid A case on optimisation of heat transport (de Vreugd) Urban Volts ESB: Light as a service for industry A case on heat as a service (Schouten) Solo Energy: VPP, Storage, P2P, flexibility services Ochno: Smart power and communication infra for offices, full control of connected things. ESCO cases (3) on innovative heat services (Zegwaard, Van Hout and ST warmte) Grid Beyond: total solution for flexibility Consumers and industry
  11. 11. Transition studies explaining how entrepreneurs experience the system Initial Findings Complexity and interwovenness Uncertain pathways Organised irresponsibility/ no governance Different perspectives/Lost in translation Resistance
  12. 12. From ignoring to following to reconfiguring the system
  13. 13. Case Studies Netherlands Ireland Sweden Australia A sustainable district case: Talis A community Virtual Power Plant case: Community Power Negnic: smart thermostat delivering flexibity services CONSORT Bruny Island microgrid An all-electric district case: Hoogdalem Solar Stream: EPC service business related to PV roof space for businesses Smart Front: Upgrading façade, indoor climate and insulation in one go Yackadanda community microgrid A community Virtual Power Plant case: Loenen Veolia Dublin Mater hospital: EPC service and fund Citizen-driven innovation platform that aims to create a climate friendly district: Hammersby Electricity Monash University Campus microgrid A case on optimisation of heat transport (de Vreugd) Urban Volts ESB: Light as a service for industry A case on heat as a service (Schouten) Solo Energy: VPP, Storage, P2P, flexibility services Ochno: Smart power and communication infra for offices, full control of connected things. ESCO cases (3) on heat (Zegwaard, Van Hout and ST warmte) Grid Beyond: total solution for flexibility C&I
  14. 14. Van Hout Netherlands: “we train the actors within the banks who have to deal with the new models like ours, the whole installations and building model included. Just to be sure they feel at ease with the new risk models they’re about to engage with.” Veolia Ireland: This model is about bringing a new business model to the market and get the market to respond. Analysis
  15. 15. Ngenic Sweden: Ngenic is aiming to provide good examples on flexibility services in spite of a lack of peak pricing mechanisms in Sweden, such that these mechanisms will be put in place. Monash Electricity Microgrid Operator Australia Universities have an important role to play in challenging the existing energy institutions and experimenting with new models and can do so as part of their core focus of research and education, mediating between practice, policy and innovation. Yacakanda Australia Decentralisation does not necessarily lead to democratization. In most DER trials it is actually the households that are delivering a public service and value to the network. As such the network operators/gentailers are both customers and initiators of their own business model.” Analysis
  16. 16. Institutional Entrepreneurship entrepreneur context characteristics relevant skills Strategic entrepreneur Defined by socio-technical systems, operating in a complex and dynamic environment Does not aim to challenge socio- technical systems, but aims at scaling up High adaptability and agility Technical skills, business management skills, interpersonal skills Grassroots initiatives Local, community led. Embedded in socio-technical systems, but not defined by them Challenge socio-technical systems, but do particularly not aim to scale up Creating legitimacy on community level Institutional entrepreneur Embedded in socio-technical systems, but not defined by them. Operating in a complex and dynamic environment Challenges socio-technical systems, able to disrupt, create or maintain institutions Has particular institutional interests (Institutional) dynamic capabilities, transition competences, additional skills Positioning the institutional entrepreneur Defining institutional entrepreurneurship ”Individuals/organizations or a group of individuals/organizations that have a particular institutional interest and aim to disrupt existing sociotechnical configurations/institutional elements and reconfigure or create new sociotechnical configurations and or institutional elements to further their business” (based on Garud et al, 2007; Heiskanen et al., 2019; Jolly et al., 2016; Mahzouni, 2019).
  17. 17. Institutional Entrepreneurship Skills of an institutional entrepreneur: dynamic capabilities + transition skills Individual Organisational Institutional Sensing + systems thinking + interpersonal skills Orchestration + normative skills Conceptualising+ anticipatory skills Scaling / streching + strategic skills Gaining social acceptance, gaining insights from relevant stakeholders, building on on-going dialogues, create a common vision at multiple levels Business propositions revolve around gained insights and can be (re)adjusted, aligning with (potential new) laws and policies Negotiation with the ‘right’ people, engagement in political work, convincing that the uptake of the business proposition should be stimulated by (new)laws and policies New business models are facilitated by new laws and policies and also picked up by other businesses
  18. 18. Conclusions and implications - Business models are shaped by institutions but also vice versa. The uptake of new business models therefore depends on (new) institutional arrangements and vice versa! - By disrupting existing institutions and creating new ones, institutional entrepreneurs can create more favorable conditions for the rollout of their business model and pave the way - Therefore they are important transition accelerators for business opportunities for other entrepreneurs that are less active on an institutional level - To disrupt existing institutions, particular capabilities (DC’s, transition competences) on multiple levels (individual, organizational, institutional) are essential, these need to be trained or transferred otherwise - Institutional entrepreneurship as a lens helps us to identify valuable actors that can have significant impact on the acceleration of the energy transition
  19. 19. Thank you! Name Role Country E-mail Ruth Mourik Operating Agent Netherlands ruth.mourik@duneworks.nl Tony Fullelove National Expert Australia tony.fullelove@monash.edu Joanna Southernwood National Expert Ireland jo.southernwood@ierc.ie Matthew Kennedy National Expert Ireland matthew.kennedy@ierc.ie Renske Bouwknegt National Expert Netherlands renske@ideate.nl Lotta Bångens National Expert Sweden lotta.bangens@aton.se https://userstcp.org/annex/business-models-and-systems/

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