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Traute Parrie - Yellowstone Business Partnership

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Presentation to Sustainable Summits 2014.

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Traute Parrie - Yellowstone Business Partnership

  1. 1. Beartooth Ranger District Yellowstone Business Partnership
  2. 2. Here to describe a Federal – Private alignment in promoting sustainable operations that I believe is: • A good model • Easily replicated • Holds participants accountable – but at a scale of their choosing • Promotes Sustainability Leadership • Rewarding! • Expanding
  3. 3. WHO ARE WE?
  4. 4. Beartooth Ranger District (Custer NF) in GYA map Yellowstone Business Partnership map
  5. 5. HOME OF MOUNTAINEERS
  6. 6. Ralph Saunders as Fred Inabnit 1866-1928 East Rosebud, Beartooth Mountains
  7. 7. First ascent of Granite Peak, highest point in Montana Elers Koch Forest Supervisor Ferguson, and JC Whitham August 19, 1923 Last of the statehighpoints to be climbed
  8. 8. Chad Chadwick displaying “vintage” ice gear
  9. 9. Doug Chabot Climber – Director, Gallatin Avalanche Center Co-founder, with Genevieve Chabot, of the Iqra Fund on Hellroaring Icefall, Beartooths
  10. 10. Headwall Skiing Beartooth Basin formerly The Red Lodge International Ski and Snowboard Camp, Beartooth Pass at nearly 11,000’elevation open Memorial Day to July 4 “You could call it backcountry skiing with a lift.”
  11. 11. Beyond the Beartooths: Renny Jackson
  12. 12. Todd Skinner Bobby Model Photo:BillHatcher
  13. 13. Ice Climbing Hyalite THESE MOUNTAINS BREED PASSION!
  14. 14. INSPIRING RANGES
  15. 15. Granite Peak highest point in Montana, Beartooth and Yellowstone Districts
  16. 16. Black Canyon Lake Spirit and Forget-Me-Not Mountains Beartooth District
  17. 17. Mystic Lake in front of Mystic EquinoxTower Ouzel Lake, East Rosebud Trail
  18. 18. Beyond the Beartooths: GrandTeton fromTeton Crest
  19. 19. Wind River Range – Titcomb BasinTrail Photo: Copeland
  20. 20. Photo: SummitPost.org Pilot and Index – Shoshone National Forest
  21. 21. Greater Yellowstone Area What’s at risk??
  22. 22. Plight of the Pika
  23. 23. Alpine vegetation - Gentian
  24. 24. Cascade Fire 2008 10,000 acre fire 6 mi outsideRed Lodge
  25. 25. Smoke above Absaroka Mountains, outside Cody August, 2007
  26. 26. Glacier below Rearguard Beartooth Mountains
  27. 27. Grasshopper Glacier – Beartooth Mountains 1951
  28. 28. Grasshopper Glacier – Beartooth Mountains 1953
  29. 29. Grasshopper Glacier – Beartooth Mountains 1976
  30. 30. Grasshopper Glacier – Beartooth Mountains 1988
  31. 31. Grasshopper Glacier – Beartooth Mountains 1994
  32. 32. Grasshopper Glacier – Beartooth Mountains 2002
  33. 33. Ice PatchArcheology – Coiled Basket foundAugust 2013
  34. 34. Ranger on Teton Glacier
  35. 35. Loss of Teton Glacier
  36. 36. Whitebark Pine
  37. 37. WHAT OPPORTUNITIES DO WE HAVE? Definition of Sustainable Development: "Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs".
  38. 38. WHAT OPPORTUNITIES DO WE HAVE? We can accomplish more together -
  39. 39. Federal side: Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee (GYCC ) Formed in 1964 = core federal lands in the Greater Yellowstone area: 2 National Parks Yellowstone NP Grand Teton NP 6 National Forests Shoshone, Bridger-Teton, Caribou-Targhee, Gallatin, and portions of the Beaverhead-Dearlodge and Custer National Forests 2 National Wildlife Refuges Elk Refuge in Jackson Hole Red Rocks and more recently, adjacent BLM Resource Areas.
  40. 40. Beartooth Ranger District (Custer NF) in GYA map Yellowstone Business Partnership map
  41. 41. Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee (GYCC) Sub-Committees to address various resource issues in common, such as invasive species fire management fisheries issues air quality, climate change, and sustainable operations.
  42. 42. GYCC Sustainable Operation Subcommittee Cultivating Change Today, Growing Environmental Stewardship for Tomorrow Focus Areas — SOS: • Water Conservation • Recycling and Waste Stream Reduction • Energy Conservation • Employee, Visitor and Community Education • Green Purchasing • Fleet and Transportation Management Strategic Vision: As stewards of this very special place, our objective is to cultivate a behavioral shift amongst permittees, concessionaires, employees, and visitors that will promote a heightened awareness of our connectivity to and responsibility for the environment. The SOS through the support of the GYCC will continue to emerge as a leader in ecosystem wide sustainability. Through the efforts of dedicated employees the committee will advance sound environmental stewardship practices.
  43. 43. Yellowstone Business Partnership The Yellowstone Business Partnership unites businesses dedicated to preserving a healthy environment and shaping a prosperous and sustainable future for communities in the Yellowstone-Teton region. The Partnership promotes scientific understanding, informed dialogue, and collaborative approaches to resolving our region’s most complex cross boundary socioeconomic and natural resource challenges. Modeled after Sierra Business Council
  44. 44. Beartooth Ranger District (Custer NF) in GYA map Yellowstone Business Partnership map
  45. 45. Yellowstone Business Partnership just finished it’s 10th year. Note UnCommon Sense program.
  46. 46. What is the UnCommon Sense program? A two year leadership program for businesses and organizations seeking to operate more efficiently and responsibly. There are 28,000 business in the GYA. Think of the potential! 8 Modules: 1. Leading the Way 2. Waste Stream Managemet 3. Responsible Purchasing 4. Social and Community Investment 5. Energy Efficiencies 6. Water Efficiencies 7. Transportation Efficiencies 8. Business Response to Climate Change (including our ghg emissions reduction action plan) UCS accountability! Scorecards for each module with points required for graduation. Viewed as a regional certification.
  47. 47. Who is in the UnCommon Sense program? USFS Partners in UCS: Red Lodge Mountain ski area • Bridger Bowl ski area • Stillwater Mining Company (platinum, palladium) – 2nd largest employer in State of Montana Greater influence; Reach more members of the public, employees Fellow UCS classmates – Montana State U, Teton Science School, several architectural firms, City of Bozeman, NOLS, Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center, Post Register newspaper, First Interstate Bank, several restaurants and travel companies Expanding to the Crown of the Continent – to Glacier NP/Big Mountain/Whitefish area
  48. 48. WHAT OPPORTUNITIES DO WE HAVE? We can accomplish more together -
  49. 49. Federal – Private partnership WHY DID WE JOIN? My rationale for joining YBP, then UnCommon Sense program: Want to support YBP’s commitment to the triple bottom line: • Environmental, • Social and • Economic well-being of the communities of the GYA • Well aligned with our own objectives • Our agency needs to “Walk the Talk”, • as land managers • for Consistency with our Permittees in the UnCommon Sense program • Red Lodge Mountain • Stillwater Mine
  50. 50. Quote from Paul Hawken - environmental entrepreneur and widely published author: “Business is the only mechanism on the planet today powerful enough to produce the changes necessary to reverse global environmental and social degradation.”
  51. 51. Federal – Private partnership Common goals for and barriers to sustainable operations – for both Government and Business • Common Drivers: • Reduce overhead costs to free up more money to do mission work • As taxpayers, we all have an interest in reducing operating costs • Common interest in maintaining natural resources • Common Challenges: • Employee capacity; It takes time • It can take money • Skepticism • Unique Challenge (Federal side): • Incentive to reduce our overhead costs is much more indirect. How to get those savings back to the unit? • Therefore, looking for opportunities to leverage our own practices with those of neighboring participants including our own permittees (ski area, platinum mine) – influence vendors, bring in bio-fuel, etc
  52. 52. GYCC Sustainable Operation Subcommittee Cultivating Change Today, Growing Environmental Stewardship for Tomorrow Accomplishments—SOS: Energy Conservation: • GYA Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Inventory completed on all units. This was the first ecosystem-wide GHG inventory. • Subsequent GHG Emissions Reduction Action Plan – 20% by 2020 • Georgia Tech interns conducted GYA wide assessment of energy conservation opportunities in historic buildings, while maintaining historic integrity • Exploring micro-hydro opportunities at remote work centers Water Conservation: • Kohler, Inc. donated 37 water conserving fixtures to be installed across the GYA, resulting in a projected reduction of water consumption by an estimated 450,000 gallons per year.
  53. 53. solar panels, Ennis Ranger Station
  54. 54. Pulling barbed wire fence. Recycled 12.8 miles of fence, or 14.5 T of steel. Photo: Beau Fredlund
  55. 55. Laurance S Rockefeller Preserve Tetons
  56. 56. Red Lodge Mountain
  57. 57. Glass pulverizer - YNP RECYCLING
  58. 58. Stillwater Mine
  59. 59. Bio-diesel – at the mine, the Park, and the Forest?
  60. 60. Water
  61. 61. Wildlife
  62. 62. Lamar Buffalo Ranch, YNP and Yellowstone Institute
  63. 63. Mobile propane canister and bear spray canister recycling units
  64. 64. Local partnership: Coupons from us, to get a discount on reusable bottles at the local mountaineering shop
  65. 65. Sharing the news with the public: - the need - how can visitors help?
  66. 66. Beartooth District GreenTeam - graduates! - 2013
  67. 67. BEYOND THE GREATER YELLOWSTONE
  68. 68. Central Cascade Mountains – Leavenworth Climbing Rangers – Recovered webbing Prusik Peak – Enchantments Alpine Lakes Wilderness
  69. 69. 10th Mountain Huts – solar panels at Betty Bear Hut
  70. 70. Mountain Culture • Indigenous cultures - Inherently sustainable? • Effects of tourism
  71. 71. Khumbu
  72. 72. Khumbu
  73. 73. Khumbu
  74. 74. The journey continues…! – it is SO rewarding, refreshing, and inspirational interacting with businesses outside the usual USFS sphere, and to see how much they can accomplish! I would highly encourage folks to look into joining similar organizations in your area.
  75. 75. Lead From Where You’re At
  76. 76. Beartooth Ranger District Yellowstone Business PartnershipTraute Parrie District Ranger Beartooth Ranger District Custer Gallatin National Forest tparrie@fs.fed.us 406-446-4529

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