Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Karen Rollins: Sustainable Mountain Accommodation – BEES

124 views

Published on

Day 2 - Presented to Sustainable Summits 2016
Karen Rollins: Sustainable Mountain Accommodation – BEES

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Karen Rollins: Sustainable Mountain Accommodation – BEES

  1. 1. Sustainable Cold Climate  Construction Karen Rollins Sustainable Summits Conference 2016 Aoraki Mount Cook National Park New Zealand
  2. 2. Cold Climate  Construction Alpine  Construction Sustainable  Construction Introduction
  3. 3. Cold Climate Subarctic/arctic >12,600 heating degree days Very Cold >9,000 heating degree days Cold >5,400 heating degree days SNOW ZONE ALPINE SUBALPINE MONTANE FOOTHILLS Polar Desert
  4. 4. Cold Climate Construction A. Cold Temperatures (How cold affects design  and operation of buildings) Two design strategies for  cold climates: B. Heat Loss Control C. Moisture Control
  5. 5. A. Cold Temperatures Challenges: • Frozen precipitation  (snow, frost, hoarfrost,  permafrost, spindrift,  drifting snow, ice) • Extreme temperature  shifts • Wind, wind‐driven rain  (DRWP) • Freeze/thaw cycles • UV radiation • Maintenance (remote) Design Considerations: • Robust building materials and  mechanical systems – Don’t crack in cold T – Expansion and contraction • Roof designed for snow load • Structural strength (wind pressure) • Special design for building  envelopes to accommodate all  seasons • Backup & redundancy
  6. 6. Spindrift and Snowdrift • Mountain climber: Loose powdery snow incapable of  holding protection • Engineer: Fine wind borne snow capable of entering a  building through any opening in the building envelope
  7. 7. B. Heat Loss Control Overall heat loss control strategy: 1. Control thermal building envelope – Heat Loss mechanisms • Conduction • Convection • Radiation 2. Control air leakage
  8. 8. 1. Control Thermal Envelope 1965 1980 1985 1990 Passive House
  9. 9. Heat Loss Through Conduction Thermal Bridge
  10. 10. Dust Marks
  11. 11. Solutions for Thermal Bridging
  12. 12. 2. Control Air Leakage
  13. 13. Solutions for Air Leakage AIR BARRIER • impermeable to air flow • continuous over the entire building enclosure • able to withstand forces during and after  construction • durable over the lifespan of the building
  14. 14. Solutions for Air Leakage
  15. 15. Ice Damming COLDER AREA WARMER AREA 4. WATER GETS TRAPPED AND BACKS UP UNDER SHINGLES 1. HEAT LOSS 2. UNDERSIDE OF ROOF IS WARMED AND MELTS SNOW 3. WATER FREEZES AT EAVES AND FORMS ICE DAM AND ICICLES Causes water damage in the attic
  16. 16. Solutions for Ice Damming Continuous air barrier Insulation Ventilation Heat tape SOFFIT VENT GABLE VENT RIDGE VENT ROOF VENT
  17. 17. Insulation  Ventilation Eave Protection Heat tape Water Shield
  18. 18. C. Moisture Control Overall Moisture Control Strategy: • In cold climates the goal is to make it as  difficult as possible for the building assemblies  to get wet from the interior.  • In cold climates building assemblies dry  towards the exterior, therefore permeable  (breathable) materials are specified as exterior  sheathings.
  19. 19. Condensation
  20. 20. a) Increase condensing surface temperature b) Vapour barrier to keep moisture out of walls c) Ventilation to remove moisture d) Source control Strategies to Control Condensation
  21. 21. a) Increase Condensing Surface Temperature Inside  +20C Outside  ‐20C
  22. 22. b) Vapour Barrier • 6 mil polyethylene  installed on warm side  of insulation • Continuous, all joints  and penetrations  sealed Inside  +20C Outside  ‐20C
  23. 23. c) Ventilation to Remove Moisture Heat Recovery Ventilator
  24. 24. d) Source Control
  25. 25. EXHAUST WARM AIR RISES AIR INTAKE
  26. 26. Sustainable Construction Increase  Efficiency Increase  Efficiency Energy Water Building  Materials Reduce ImpactReduce Impact Environment Human  Health Life‐cycleLife‐cycle Design Build  Maintenance  Demolition …Striving towards
  27. 27. Priorities • People priorities – Health and safety – Comfort – Affordability  • Building priorities – Durability – Renovation – Decommissioning  • Environmental priorities – Local, regional, global environment
  28. 28. Features of Sustainable Construction • Preserve natural vegetation on site • Rain water collection • Reduce construction waste • Recycled, durable, local building materials • Efficient furnace • Reduce heat loss through building envelope  (insulation and air sealing) • Renewable energy, reduced use of fossil fuels • IAQ plan, reduced air pollution, low VOC
  29. 29. Most Sustainable Structure Local building materials (zero transportation costs) Recyclable building materials Durable materials Zero G.H.G. to manufacture building materials Zero environmental impact (local, regional, global) Easy to decommission Affordable
  30. 30. Alpine Construction Design Challenges: • Off‐grid • Remote • Extreme low temperatures • Extreme wind • Snowfall, drifting snow, spindrift • Moisture producing activities • No live in custodian (easy to operate technologies) • Periodic use (thermal conditions not steady)  • National Parks location (building restrictions)
  31. 31. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  32. 32. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  33. 33. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus  Wapta Icefields near Mount Des Poilus (2580m, 54°L) Alpine Club of Canada (owner, general contractor) BEES (design criteria and building specifications) Architect: Greg Jablonski Team:  structural engineer, mechanical engineer, environmental assessment, alternate energy designer, surveyor, weather study, SIP manufacturer, propane  plumber, helicopter, many volunteers
  34. 34. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  35. 35. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  36. 36. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  37. 37. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  38. 38. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  39. 39. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  40. 40. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  41. 41. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  42. 42. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  43. 43. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  44. 44. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  45. 45. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  46. 46. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  47. 47. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  48. 48. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  49. 49. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  50. 50. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  51. 51. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  52. 52. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  53. 53. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  54. 54. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  55. 55. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  56. 56. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  57. 57. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  58. 58. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  59. 59. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  60. 60. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  61. 61. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  62. 62. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  63. 63. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  64. 64. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  65. 65. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  66. 66. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  67. 67. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  68. 68. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  69. 69. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  70. 70. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  71. 71. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  72. 72. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  73. 73. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  74. 74. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  75. 75. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  76. 76. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  77. 77. Guy Hut at Mount Des Poilus 
  78. 78. Build a structure that enhances visitor  experience and acts as a model for other off‐ grid facilities Vision
  79. 79. • Environmental integrity • Advanced construction methods and  materials: sustainable construction features • Reliable and easy to operate technologies  • Energy efficient  • Healthy indoor environment Design Goals
  80. 80. ! Vision Build!a!structure! that!enhances!visitor! experience!and!acts! as!a!model!for!other! off6grid!mountain! facili8es!around!the! world! Goal Advanced! construc8on! methods!and! materials! Goal Superior! Energy! Effic i ency! Goal Easy!to!operate!and! maintain!technologies! Goal Excellent!indoor!air! quality! Goal Environmental!Integrity! Structural! Insulated! Panels! Reduced! thermal! bridging! Boiling!snowmelt! to!treat!potable! water! Structural! Insulated! Panels! Super! insulated:! Passive! House! Standard! Structural! Insulated! Panels! Structural! Insulated! Panels! Solar/wind! hybrid! renewable! energy! system! Greywater! dispersion! field! Barrel!fly6 out!system! Propane! stove! Solar/wind! hybrid! renewable! energy! system! Propane! stove! Heat! recovery! ventilation!! Reduced! thermal! bridging! Heat! recovery! ventilation! Recycled! content! building! materials! Super!insulated:! Passive!House! Standard! Super! insulated:! Passive! House! Standard! Super! insulated:! Passive! House! Standard! Reduced! site! disturbance! Low!VOC! emitting! building! materials! Daylight! and!views! Moisture! control! strategies! Indoor! environmental! monitoring!! Barrel!fly6 out!system! Grey6water! dispersion! field! Heat! recovery! ventilation!! Structural! Insulated! Panels! Propane! stove! Solar/wind! hybrid! renewable! energy! system! Reduced! thermal! bridging! Moisture! control! strategies! Recycled! content! building! materials!
  81. 81. • Considerations for ecological integrity – winter use, 700/yr.  • Greywater treatment: dispersion field • Low visual impact, small footprint • Construction waste management, recycled building materials  (flooring), durable building materials, locally manufactured  building materials, low VOC materials (paint, caulking) • Energy efficient building envelope • Heat primarily from the sun (80‐90%) • Propane (burns cleanly) for cooking, lighting, heating • Renewable energy system: solar and wind (lighting,  ventilation) • Human waste removed from the site Sustainable Construction Features
  82. 82. • Well‐insulated thermal building envelope • Reduced thermal bridging • Air tight construction: air barrier, vapour barrier • Heat and ventilation to prevent condensation • Covered front entrance and air lock entry • Technologies are easy to operate and maintain • Redundancy in lighting and heating and  ventilation • Moisture control strategies Cold Climate Construction Features
  83. 83. Moisture Control Strategies  • Heat • Ventilation • Super‐insulation • Minimal thermal bridging • Keep furnishings (kitchen cabinets, sleeping  bunks) away from exterior walls • Drying room for wet gear to isolate moisture  from the rest of the hut (ventilated)
  84. 84. Well‐insulated R‐16         R‐24           R‐24             R‐32                  R‐45                      R‐50 Passive House 1965 1985 20051988 Bow Hut 2014 Des Poilus Hut
  85. 85. Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) • Walls, floor, roof • Structural framing, insulation,  air barrier, vapour barrier  • Short assembly time • Strong • High insulating value • Air‐tight • Reduced thermal bridging • Moisture control • Fire resistant
  86. 86. Healthy Indoor Environment  • Temperature control – high quality thermal envelope, air lock  entry, heat source (sun and propane stove)  • Ventilation – Kitchen, bedroom, drying room exhaust – Fresh air warmed by propane stove • Moisture control to prevent condensation and mould • Propane instead of wood burning ‐ particulates • Layout designed by an architect • Day lighting & views • Low VOC building materials
  87. 87. • Alpine construction can feature sustainable  construction and cold climate construction • Cold climate during construction can play a  significant role Conclusions
  88. 88. • Cold Climate Housing Research Centre – Fairbanks Alaska • ASHRAE: Cold‐Climate Buildings Design Guide • Builder’s Guide to Cold Climates – Joseph  Lstiburek • Canadian Center for Housing Technology • CMHC Canadian Wood‐Frame House  Construction Resources
  89. 89. Thank YOU!

×