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Re-Imagining Collaboration: How One City is Transforming Trash into Treasure

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Re-Imagining Collaboration: How One City is Transforming Trash into Treasure

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When the city of Phoenix published a strategic plan for building regional collaboration to not only improve waste diversion but to "transform trash into treasure", Assistant Public Works Director John Trujillo tapped the expertise of the Sustainability Solutions Services at Arizona State University. Trujillo recognized the convening power of the university as a trusted partner to corporations and communities in solving sustainability challenges. Now this city-university team is collaborating with corporate partners like Salt River Project and Mayo Clinic to transform recyclables into bio-fuels and manufacturing materials for new products.

When the city of Phoenix published a strategic plan for building regional collaboration to not only improve waste diversion but to "transform trash into treasure", Assistant Public Works Director John Trujillo tapped the expertise of the Sustainability Solutions Services at Arizona State University. Trujillo recognized the convening power of the university as a trusted partner to corporations and communities in solving sustainability challenges. Now this city-university team is collaborating with corporate partners like Salt River Project and Mayo Clinic to transform recyclables into bio-fuels and manufacturing materials for new products.

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Re-Imagining Collaboration: How One City is Transforming Trash into Treasure

  1. 1. Re-Imagining Collaboration: How One City is Transforming Trash into Resources
  2. 2. Dan O’Neill General Manager Sustainability Solutions Services Walton Sustainability Solutions Services Arizona State University John Trujillo Assistant Director Public Works Department City of Phoenix Ryan Kirane Director of Supply Chain Management and Sustainability Officer Mayo Clinic in Arizona Re-Imagining the Public-Private Partnership: How One City is Transforming Trash into Resources
  3. 3. 3 Reimagine Phoenix: The sustainability initiative
  4. 4. 4 To educate, inspire, and engage everyone throughout Phoenix to increase their waste diversion to 40 percent by the year 2020 while considering all aspects of reduce, reuse and recycle in their daily lives.
  5. 5. 5 Phoenix National average Phoenix’s new goal 16 percent citywide diversion rate FY 2012-13 34.1 percent national avg. recycling rate 2011 Citywide diversion rate 40 percent by 2020 Citywide Goal
  6. 6. Solid waste travels more than 7 million miles every year – equivalent to going to the moon and back 14 times.
  7. 7. The amount of trash Phoenix sends to the landfill each year could fill Chase Field 7 times.
  8. 8. 2014
  9. 9. Focus Areas 9 1. Enhance the current solid waste programs to encourage more sustainable practices. 2. Increase communication and education about sustainability to residents and businesses. 3. Partner with industry and other community leaders.
  10. 10. Green Organics Curbside Collection Save as you Reduce and Recycle 10 Solid Waste Program Enhancements Bulk Trash SAY R&R
  11. 11. 11 Website Newsletters P@YS Listserve Social Media City-owned media Community events Paid media Communication and outreach Community outreach
  12. 12. 27th Avenue Transfer Station
  13. 13. 13 Innovation Campus “Hub”
  14. 14. Innovation Campus “Hub”
  15. 15. Possible benefits (2020) 4-year $2-3 million investment: Firm revenues: $120 million New firms: 10 New jobs: 150 Direct investment: $50 million Diversion: 500,000 tons Waste utilization: 1 million tons Operational savings: $20 million
  16. 16. 16 Partnership Development
  17. 17. ©2011 MFMER | slide-18©2011 MFMER | slide-18
  18. 18. ©2011 MFMER | slide-19©2011 MFMER | slide-19 Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic Health System
  19. 19. ©2011 MFMER | slide-20 Mayo Clinic… world’s first multispecialty group practice 1864 W.W Mayo arrives in Rochester 1883-88 William J and Charles H Mayo join father 1914 First ‘Mayo Clinic’ building 1919 Brothers create not-for-profit Foundation 1987 Geographic expansion to Arizona and Florida Three Shields • Patient Care • Education • Research
  20. 20. ©2011 MFMER | slide-21©2011 MFMER | slide-21 • Charitable, not-for-profit; academic medical center • $9.4 billion in revenue (net and other sources) • 3,750 physicians and scientists: 2,700 residents, fellows, and students • 55,030 – total personnel • 4,275 licensed beds – 24 hospitals in 6 states • Provide essential health care services to 1 million patients annually from more than 135 countries Mission: To inspire hope and contribute to health and well-being by providing the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education, and research. Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic Health System
  21. 21. ©2011 MFMER | slide-22 Sustainability @ Mayo Clinic is… Strategic Themes • Energy management • Waste stream reduction • Greening the Supply Chain • Built Environment • Industry Engagement The wise use of limited resources.
  22. 22. ©2011 MFMER | slide-23 Timeline 2009-2011 Grassroots Teams 2011-2012 Strategic Plan & Committee Structure 2012-2013 Sustainability Scorecard w ASU Intern 2013-2020 Improvement Plans
  23. 23. ©2011 MFMER | slide-24 Mayo Clinic in Arizona Waste Stream Reduction 2013 Q1 13% Recycling Rate Q2-Q3 Co-mingled recycling, Styrofoam, landscaping, and reusable pillows Q4 Reimagine Phoenix 40x20 Challenge
  24. 24. Leveraging knowledge as value for public-private partnerships Dan O’Neill General Manager Sustainability Solutions Services
  25. 25. universities must provide education, discovery, innovation and interface to yield solutions to global challenges. Global Institute of Sustainability
  26. 26. Over 300 sustainability scientists and scholars
  27. 27. Faculty teams George Basile Sustainability Nick Brown Sustainability Nicole Darnall Public Policy Tom Seagar Engineering Brad Allenby Engineering Ken Galluppi Info. Modeling Duke Reiter Design
  28. 28. Rob and Melani Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives Delivering sustainability solutions, Accelerating global impact, Inspiring future leaders.
  29. 29. Solutions Services Global Centers Global Studies Festival Next- Generation Projects Executive Master’s Fellows Climate Center at the core: global solutions Solutions
  30. 30. Sustainability Solutions Services Our goal: to be a trusted transformational sustainability partner with our clients.
  31. 31. Sustainability Solutions Services Assemble teams to collaborate with clients to deliver real, practical, effective, affordable sustainability solutions that create public and private value.
  32. 32. city&ngoprojects/proposals Regional • Phoenix: GHG inventory / CAP • Gilbert: building energy efficiency • Tempe: urban forestry program • The Nature Conservancy: economic viability of small diameter pine International • Haarlemmermeer: Beyond Sustainability • Lagos: sustainability school
  33. 33. corporateprojects • Waste Management: sustainability visioning • SRP: waste stream characterization • Dell: sustainable packaging • Johnson Utilities: biofuel feasibility • Ray C. Anderson: Sustainability iProjects • Henkel: product innovation • Delta Development: healthy buildings
  34. 34. Sustainability-Driven Economic Development The Business Case For Sustainability Public Private new value creation & a sustainable future overlappinginterests
  35. 35. • Address key resources beginning with solid waste • Pursue integrated resource management • Facilitate regional public/private collaboration • Cities: mirror public works • Corporations: resource efficiency as business case • NGO’s: key supporting issues • Complement other ASU initiatives RISN Strategy
  36. 36. • Business creation and growth • Job creation • Increased waste aversion, diversion and conversion • Cost savings and efficiencies for cities • Reputation of metro area as “smart” and sustainable • Regional collaboration • Social and Environmental impacts RISN key benefits
  37. 37. RISN projects • Education • Multi-family recycling • Industrial recycling • Green organics • Food scraps • Construction and demolition • Waste to energy • Waste to soil • Collaboration & decision support tools
  38. 38. Join the network. Create a regional innovation hub. Share your solution. resourceinnovation.asu.edu
  39. 39. QUESTIONS? Re-Imagining the Public-Private Partnership: How One City is Transforming Trash into Resources

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