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No Bees...No Blueberries




                                 ...and no almonds, no apples, no cucumbers, no melons. In fa...
Table of Contents

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Effective Approaches
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Contents                                       Preface



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S Williams Portfolio X
S Williams Portfolio X
S Williams Portfolio X
S Williams Portfolio X
S Williams Portfolio X
S Williams Portfolio X
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S Williams Portfolio X

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S Williams Portfolio X

  1. 1. No Bees...No Blueberries ...and no almonds, no apples, no cucumbers, no melons. In fact, about 33% of our produce depends on the crazy, neurotic dancing from flower to flower of a pollinating honeybee. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), the mysterious disappearance of honeybees, was first detected in December 2006 and has spread rapidly causing an alarming loss of hives. This fragile segment of our food ecosystem needs our urgent support—and Wyman’s will contribute $50,000 this year to university research. Please join Wyman’s to help North America’s beekeepers. To learn more visit the Pollinator Partnership at www.pollinator.org. Maine • Prince Edward Island www.wymans.com Recommended by Future Generations Ad for Jasper Wyman & Son Design by Susan Williams @ Colvin Williams
  2. 2. Table of Contents 2 The International Center for Ethics, Justice, and Public Life: A History Developed through discussions between Brandeis President Jehuda Reinharz and Abraham Feinberg, the Center since 1998 has focused on efforts to foster international justice and coexistence. Highlights of the Center’s Work 6 The Center has engaged its constituents through flag- ship programs such as the Alan B. Slifka Program in Intercommunal Coexistence, as well as publications, events, activities, and courses. A World of Justice 8 International judges from courts and tribunals around the world have found a network and a chance to learn from one another through the Brandeis Pro- grams in International Justice and Society. 10 A Broadening Experience Supplemented by coursework related to the experi- ence, the Ethics Center Student Fellowship offers Brandeis sophomores and juniors a chance to experi- ence summer internships in organizations of their choice all over the world. A Course to End Conflict 12 The Master of Arts in Coexistence and Conflict trains mid-career professionals with a curriculum that spans the theory and practice of solving intercommu- nal disputes. 14 The Art of Reconciliation The Center brings together the artistic community to address moral questions and social-justice issues. 17 The International Advisory Board The board, which includes members from politics, law, scholarship, activism, the arts, and other fields, July 23-28, 2007: The fifth Brandeis In- has helped shape the Center’s work. stitute for International Judges, held The Art of Reconciliation ers who documented and reflected on their work; and “Literary Responses gram in Intercommunal Coexistence and director of Coexistence Research in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, addresses the theme “Independence and Interdependence: the Delicate to Mass Violence,” which brought to- and International Collaborations, who Ethics Center initiatives showcase the power of literature, theatre, art, and music gether writers to reflect on the writing has researched and written extensively Balance of International Justice.” to forge reconciliation and coexistence and testimony that has been published on the artistic dimensions of coexis- October 4-8, 2007: “Acting Together on in the wake of the Holocaust, South tence. She also has collaborated with the World Stage: Setting the Scene for C harles Mulekwa watched a pression, the world had been brought the world. It’s one example of how African apartheid, and the genocide in many artists from cultural centers that Peace” explores the contributions of Rwanda, among other recent tragedies. seek to heal the wounds of violence theatre and ritual to coexistence. performance from another a bit closer. the Center brings together the artistic continent, another culture, “This suffering of his people community to address moral ques- Scott Edmiston, the founder and in their home countries. Examples October 8-10, 2007: Held in Accra, another world away from his native and my people, and we are talking,” tions and social-justice issues, show- director of the University’s Office of include the Reyum Institute of Art Ghana, the second West African Judi- Uganda. At Brandeis, members of he recalled. “We’ve met in America, casing the power of literature, theatre, the Arts, touts such efforts as central and Culture in Cambodia, Artist Proof cial Colloquium, entitled “Promoting the Peruvian theatre company Grupo and we’re talking. That space where art, and music to forge reconciliation to Brandeis’s founding mission. Studio in South Africa, and drumming Judicial Independence and Access “It’s important to me that the groups in several African nations. to Global Jurisprudence,” aims to Cultural Yuyachkani portrayed people the thinking goes to, where you realize and coexistence. arts and the values of this university further efforts to create a network in their country being forced off buses that you’re not alone, becomes very The Center also has hosted In one piece, she wrote about the among supreme and high court and taken away. The same thing, Mule- important in this initiative.” events such as “The Arts of Building are linked in a way that’s significant power of such efforts to inspire rec- judges in West Africa. kwa realized, had happened in his own That event brought together Peace,” which explored how visual and meaningful,” he says. “And I onciliation: “In divided communities country. authors working on an anthology arts, theater, and cultural work contrib- think the Ethics Center is a key part where violence has impaired people’s October 26-28, 2007: Ethics Center Mulekwa, a playwright, later that will feature contributions from ute to coexistence and reconciliation; of that. In a way that Brandeis was a capacities to listen, artists can use Student Fellows celebrate 10 years of cause when it was founded, that cause the qualities of receptivity to facilitate the program in the “ECSF Extrava- spoke to one of the performers from Mulekwa and many others spanning “Recasting Reconciliation through ganza.” Fourteen ECSF alumni give Peru during the event called “Acting the work of theatre artists and cultural Culture and the Arts,” an international — education and justice for all — is expression, healing, and reciprocal presentations and the Brandeis Play- Together on the World Stage.” And workers in conflict regions around fellowship of artists and cultural work- really originating in the Ethics Center. understanding. The qualities of listen- back Theatre Society performs. through shared pain and artistic ex- That’s become the heart of this univer- ing associated with aesthetic attention sity in a way that grows significantly — alert but calm, emotional but cog- October 30-November 2, 2007: During every year.” nitively aware, engaged but detached a four-day residency at Brandeis, Leading the Ethics Center’s forensic anthropologist Dr. William — are precisely the kinds of presence Haglund, United Nations Senior initiatives in the arts is Cynthia Cohen, that can help people put their experi- Forensic Advisor for the International executive director of the Slifka Pro- ences into words. Also, artists’ listen- Criminal Tribunals for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia, and senior consultant to Physicians for Human Rights, speaks about his work at mass-grave sites and its implications for international justice. November 2007: Coauthored by the Center’s Daniel Terris and Leigh Swigart in collaboration with Cesare P. R. Romano, The International Judge: An Introduction to the Men and Women Who Decide the World’s Cases The Ethics Center has hosted many perfor- is published. The book is inspired by mances over the past 10 years that highlight the Center’s work with international the power of the arts to foster coexistence. judges. Some examples include (this page, from left) March 13, 2008: The Ethics Center singer and social-justice activist Pete Seeger; celebrates 10 years with a program, performer, songwriter, and educator Jane “The Next 10 Years: The Ethics Center Sapp; the Yuval Ron Ensemble, which is dedi- Looks Ahead,” a keynote address by cated to fostering an understanding of Middle Judge Thomas Buergenthal of the Eastern cultures and religions; (next page) International Court of Justice, and a Grupo Cultural Yuyachkani, a theatre group gala dinner. from Peru that accompanies the country’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission; and (page 16) the Amazones, women master drummers of Guinea. 14 The International Center for Ethics, Justice, and Public Life: The First 10 Years The International Center for Ethics, Justice, and Public Life: The First 10 Years 15 Report for Brandeis University Design by Susan Williams @ Colvin Williams
  3. 3. Effective Approaches to Global Coexistence and Justice r e f l e c t i o n A A South African judge drafts a code At the International Center for Ethics, of ethics for a new international Justice, and Public Life, members of court. A social psychologist from our extended community approach Northern Ireland uses her experiences complex and seemingly intractable in “The Troubles” to help Jewish and Palestinian Israelis develop coexistence problems in fresh and innovative ways. Building on work done in a wide array e x p e r t i s e policies. An American undergraduate of fields, they craft effective returns from central Europe with responses to injustice and new insights into the complexities violence around the world. of freedom of information in an emerging democracy. A theater artist from Sri Lanka uses performance to mobilize local communities to work l e a r n i n g for peace. A Nexus of Scholarship and Practice T The Center’s courses, institutes, conferences, and retreats offer students, scholars, and practitioners the opportunity to turn knowledge from around the globe. On the Brandeis campus, the Center is a hub of student engagement and faculty leadership in programs that integrate s y n t h e s i s into action. In this climate of deep and knowledge from across the disciplines INTERNATIONAL CENTER for ETHICS, sustained examination, new ideas can emerge and prosper. of the humanities, the social sciences, and the arts. JUSTICE, and PUBLIC LIFE The Center is the home of the world’s only regular institute for judges across i n n o v a t i o n Brandeis University the spectrum of international courts and tribunals. We have created a unique online global community of artists dedicated to the work of reconciliation. Our Master’s Program in Coexistence and Conflict builds both on the scholarly expertise of its faculty and the range of practical Front experience of its mid-career students Our Programs The Alan B. Slifka Program in Intercommunal Coexistence The Slifka Program offers a Master of Arts in Coexistence The Center was established Programs in International Justice and Society and Conflict, a graduate program that provides a solid in 1998 through the generosity grounding in both the contemporary theory and the of Abraham Feinberg. The Center’s programs in international justice and society necessary professional skills to engage in coexistence explore and enhance the work of the international justice work. The program is designed for early- and mid- system, defined broadly. The centerpiece is the Brandeis Across the Brandeis Campus career professionals who work, or aspire to work, within Institute for International Judges, held at regular intervals governments, international agencies, or business. The Center is a hub on the Brandeis campus for since 2002. This institute brings together judges serving conversations and creative ideas about coexistence and on international courts and tribunals around the world to Two other important initiatives in the Slifka Program build justice. The Ethics Center Student Fellowship enables reflect on both the philosophical aspects and the practical global connections among individuals and institutions undergraduates to spend a summer pursuing social justice, challenges of their work. Other programs include judicial committed to coexistence: Creative Resources for community empowerment, or reconciliation anywhere colloquia that build connections between domestic and Coexistence and Reconciliation, an online collection in the world. Our regular conferences and public events international judges, occasional conferences and meetings of working papers and portfolios by practicing artist- engage the campus community and feature professionals on pertinent topics, and collaborative projects designed to a c t i o n peacebuilders, and Coexistence International, a program from a broad spectrum of disciplines offering their insights make human rights concepts and documents available in committed to strengthening the field of coexistence at on contemporary issues. local communities. local, national, and international levels. c o e x i s t e n c e 415 South Street Mail Stop 086 Waltham, MA 02454-9110 781.736.8577 Brandeis University: www.brandeis.edu/ethics d i v e r s i t y ethics@brandeis.edu A Legacy of Social Justice Back F Founded in 1948, Brandeis University is named for the late Louis Dembitz Brandeis, the distinguished associate p e a c e b u i l d i n g justice of the United States Supreme Court, and reflects the ideals of academic excellence and social justice he personified. The Center works to honor and build on that legacy by providing opportunities for members of the extended Brandeis community s c h o l a r s h i p to contribute to meaningful change Brochure for Brandeis University in the world. Design by Susan Williams @ Colvin Williams
  4. 4. Contents Preface A s a teacher and a director, I have worked with hundreds Preface ……………………………..............….…..…....... iv of young people and adults in numerous theatrical 1 Bitten by the Theater Bug ............…………,,…………… productions over the past thirty years. Through the 1 2 process of choosing and studying shows, building production teams, First Things First: Your Audition …...............,,,.………… 2 auditioning actors, and guiding the creative energy of each group 7 3 Creating Scenes: the to bring a show to life, I have learned what works best for me as a How a Show is Cast ……………….…..………,,……..…. 14 Rehearsal Process director. Having the luxury to write and think about this process 4 Approaches to Acting …....……………..…..…..……..… 17 the middle of a production has given me the oppor- while I’m not in “The person you are tunity to reread books that I value about directing and acting, and to 5 t is a thousand times Developing Your Character ……….…...….…..…………. 23 synthesize the ideas that I have tested and used over the complete. You have begun research on your he casting is years. character, and you are practicing your songs. Now you will 6 Vocal Performance in Musical Theater .……..…………of36 book is performance inbegin to work withproduc- The focus this musical theater the director and other cast members. Each director has a distinct and very personal method of approaching a more interesting tions because this is the kind of theater that I enjoy directing and in 7 Creating Scenes: The Rehearsal Process ….…..…..… 49 script with actors. Some directors will spend a great deal of time than the best actor which I have the most experience. However, this information applies before getting actors onto the sitting around a table in rehearsals you could ever 8 to many types of performance—from strictly dramatic likepurelya play “on its feet” immediately and People Behind the Scenes …………...………...………. 64 stage. Other directors to to put then discuss scenes as they go. As an actor, you need to be flexible hope to be.” vocal. I hope that my observations as a director will be particularly 9 and work with each director’s style. A Brief History of Musical Theater ……..................…. junior high and high school students with little or no helpful for 75 theatrical experience who are interested in learning more about 10 All the World’s a Stage………………........……..…...…. 87 Blocking the Scene becoming better actors and performers on stage. Constantin Stanislavski 11 Vocabulary of the Theater ….…….……..........…..……. 89 Blocking refers to the patterns of movement that the actors take as they move around the stage. Blocking is usually a collaborative effort between actor and director. The director will give you suggestions 12 Further Reading …………….………….....……..……… 102 about where and when to move. Always write blocking in your script with a pencil. Your job is to discover the reasons behind your About the Author …………………………….…..…....... 106 movement and actions—or in other words, your wants. If you are unclear about why your character is directed to make a specific movement you should ask your director. During blocking rehearsals your director will ask you to move at iv iii specific times to specific places on the stage. Stage directions are v always given assuming that you, the actor, are facing the audience. The following page includes some of the basic stage terms the director will use when blocking. 49 Back wall of the stage Envisioning the Set Front During early blocking rehearsals the cast will rehearse with an USR US USL incomplete set at best. Many times, actors will rehearse with only Stage right Stage left a table and chairs or small black boxes called rehearsal cubes. In wing wing SR CS SL order for the blocking to work, you need to envision the set in a very specific way. Look at the production sketches or models of the set in order to memorize the placement of furniture, doors and props. DSR DC DSL Notice the color and patterns that the designer has chosen. Walk Apron around the stage so that you can envision the world of the show as much as possible. The director will usually help you do this. Audience • Proscenium – the arch or opening that frames the stage As the rehearsals continue and pieces of the set begin to appear, take the time before or after rehearsal to explore every nook and cranny • Apron – the area of the stage in front of the proscenium of the space. Test the furniture, feel how the door opens, check to • Wings – the space on either side of the stage not visible see if there are any sharp edges on any of the set pieces. If anything to the audience where the actors and crew wait doesn’t work, let the stage manager know so the problem can be • Up Stage (US): the back of the stage, away from the fixed. The more you can make this set feel like home, the more audience comfortable and believable you will be in your characterization. When you are not at rehearsal, try to envision the sets for various • Center Stage (CS): the visual center of the stage scenes and review your blocking with the set in mind. • Down Center (DC): the front of the stage, closest to the audience • Stage Right (SR): the right side of the stage, as the actors Learning Your Lines face the audience Memorizing lines is often stressful for actors. Lines are only words. • Stage Left (SL): the left side of the stage, as the actors Remember that objectives and actions will make your words come face the audience alive to the audience. When you find out why your character is • Down Stage Right (DSR): the front right area of the saying lines and reacts in a certain way, your lines will be easier to stage as the actors face the audience remember. Scene analysis is a good place to start. Find the high point Back • Down Stage Left (DSL): the front left area of the stage as of the scene, where the conflicts are and with whom. Next, highlight the actors face the audience your part in the script, underlining your character’s lines with a brightly colored pencil or highlighter. Some actors also write their • Up Stage Right (USR): the back right area of the stage as the actors face the audience lines in succession on cards. Be sure to put the lines that immediately precede yours on the card. These are called your cue lines. • Up Stage Left (USL): the back left area of the stage as the actors face the audience 50 51 Acting Book for Teens by Linda Potter Design, Photography & Editing by Susan Williams

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