Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

From I Can't to I Can: Multisensory Activities for Inclusive Classrooms 2015

545 views

Published on

In this experiential plenary we will define SEN, explore teachers’ beliefs and teachers’ feelings related to the inclusion of students with different learning difficulties in the English language classroom. The range of anticipated SpLDs will be discussed and a few myths exploded. Finally we will try out some multisensory strategies so that teachers can change the refrain of all from “I can’t” to “I can!!!!”

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

From I Can't to I Can: Multisensory Activities for Inclusive Classrooms 2015

  1. 1. From “I can’t!” to “I can!!!!” Multisensory ELT for Inclusive Classrooms.    1st Young Learners’ Conference1st Young Learners’ Conference British Council, ChileBritish Council, Chile October 2015October 2015 Susan Hillyard B.Ed. (Hons)Susan Hillyard B.Ed. (Hons) http://susanhillyard.blogspot.com.ar/http://susanhillyard.blogspot.com.ar/
  2. 2. Questions for todayQuestions for today  What is SEN?  What do you believe about SEN?  What is Inclusion?  What do you feel about Inclusion?  What are SpLDs?  What do you really know about SpLDs?  What are multisensory activities?  Do you feel confident to do them?  How do we do them?
  3. 3. FromFrom I CAN’TI CAN’T ToTo I CAN!I CAN!
  4. 4. Think timeThink time Special or Specific Educational Needs Identify SENs Which ones do you encounter in your classes? Think, Pair, ShareThink, Pair, Share
  5. 5. What are Special/Specific Needs?What are Special/Specific Needs?
  6. 6. Think time…Think time… Difficulties
  7. 7. Talk TimeTalk Time SuccessesSuccesses
  8. 8. Range of Specific NeedsRange of Specific Needs  dyslexia  DOD  AHDD  a physical challenge  deafness  school phobia  a disease (sometimes terminal)  cerebral palsy  Down syndrome  Asperger’s  autism  poverty  problems of conduct  disruptive behaviour  inadequate adaptation to formal educational settings  immigrants
  9. 9. What do you know?What do you know? Listen and MatchListen and Match
  10. 10.  Jonathan (17) DyslexiaJonathan (17) Dyslexia  Samson (12) ADHDSamson (12) ADHD  Natalia (19) Asperger’sNatalia (19) Asperger’s  Krystal (18) DyspraxiaKrystal (18) Dyspraxia  Gillian (21) DyscalculiaGillian (21) Dyscalculia
  11. 11. Multi-sensory activitiesMulti-sensory activities
  12. 12. SS PP II CC EE
  13. 13. DyslexiaDyslexia  variable and often familial  problems acquiring and processing own language  lack of proficiency in reading, spelling, writing  may affect spoken language  lack of phonological awareness  lack of letter/sound correspondence  use graphic stories  use pictures  use flash cards  use mime and actions  stress letter/sound correspondence  stress oral work over writing  lessen the stress  achieve more moments of success / Eureka!  
  14. 14. ADD and ADHDADD and ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder)(Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder)  tiredness, lack of energy  short attention span  poor concentration  focussing or completing tasks or being organised  problems in listening attentively  behave in an impulsive and hyperactive manner  not able to sit still or quietly  use pre-arranged warning signals  establish eye contact  put up the menu  discuss probs in private  instructions one by one  change assessment  use energisers  change activities often  minimise distractions
  15. 15. SEBDsSEBDs (Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties)(Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties)  social relationships  emotional problems  behaviour disorders  diverse and complex  present great challenges- frustration, helplessness and despair     must trust and bond with the teacher  enter into the community spirit of the classroom  games-comp, coll  action and mime  body language  private conversations
  16. 16. Asperger’sAsperger’s  social situations  making eye contact  hard to make friends  often hypersensitive to noise and crowds  focus strongly on certain interests > expert on..  normal or above average intelligence  thrives on clear expectations and routine  write class schedule and time frames on board  use visuals, charts, colour coding, graphics  use comic strips/social stories, role play  prepare for any changes  find special gifts  designate areas  use ICT for writing  use the magic circle
  17. 17. Using realia
  18. 18. Mark FletcherMark Fletcher ThereThere are noare no naughtynaughty childrenchildren
  19. 19. Four Little MonkeysFour Little Monkeys
  20. 20. General HintsGeneral Hints  Celebrate diversity/variety/difference  Cater for all learning styles/individual needs  Ask two footed Qs/relate learning to experience  Use a menu for today showing the BIG picture  Develop a leadership style based on respect and trust  Go for positive group dynamics  Make expected behaviours and attitudes clear  Check in chunks
  21. 21. Let’s do some!
  22. 22. “A curriculum with flexible goals, methods, materials, and assessments that empowers educators to meet different needs.” Joy Egbert
  23. 23. Multisensory EducationMultisensory Education AffordancesAffordances InterventionsInterventions DifferentiationDifferentiation
  24. 24. Disability is part of the human condition. Almost everyone will be temporarilyy or permanently impaired at some point in life. World Health Organisation 2011
  25. 25. Change Assessment ProceduresChange Assessment Procedures
  26. 26. Equality or Equity?Equality or Equity?
  27. 27. 93 million children, up to the age of93 million children, up to the age of 14, live with a moderate or severe14, live with a moderate or severe disability.disability. The state of the World´s Children – UNICEF 2013The state of the World´s Children – UNICEF 2013
  28. 28. ““Children with disabilities areChildren with disabilities are among the world’s mostamong the world’s most marginalized and excludedmarginalized and excluded children.”children.” World Health Organization – World Bank 2011World Health Organization – World Bank 2011
  29. 29. ““Education should be inclusive at allEducation should be inclusive at all levels and it should ensure equallevels and it should ensure equal access to the same general educationaccess to the same general education offered to all.”offered to all.” Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – 2006Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – 2006 Schools and classroomsSchools and classrooms for All, with All at All timesfor All, with All at All times
  30. 30. Action Songs
  31. 31. Resourceless ClassroomsResourceless Classrooms Use your best resources:Use your best resources: You!You! Your Students!Your Students!
  32. 32. Multisensory ActivityMultisensory Activity
  33. 33. Exploding Myths!Exploding Myths!  People with learning difficulties cannot learn languages  SEN students should be segregated in Special Schools with specialist teachers  Including SEN students in mainstream classes brings down the standards of everybody  I need to be a SEN specialist to teach English to SEN students
  34. 34. To increase the presence, participation and achievement of all learners
  35. 35. Stage Fighting
  36. 36. Making VisibleMaking Visible the Invisiblethe Invisible andand Giving VoiceGiving Voice to the Voicelessto the Voiceless
  37. 37. ReferencesReferences  Gullberg, M. ‘Multilingual Multimodality: ‘Communicative Difficulties and Their Solutions in Second LanguageGullberg, M. ‘Multilingual Multimodality: ‘Communicative Difficulties and Their Solutions in Second Language Use’, in: Streek, J., Goodwin C. and LeBaron, C. (2011). Embodied Interaction. Language and Body in theUse’, in: Streek, J., Goodwin C. and LeBaron, C. (2011). Embodied Interaction. Language and Body in the Material World. Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive, & Computational Perspectives, pp. 137 – 152.Material World. Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive, & Computational Perspectives, pp. 137 – 152. Cambridge University Press.Cambridge University Press.    Adam, Hajo, and Adam D. Galinsky. “Enclothed Cognition.” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 48,Adam, Hajo, and Adam D. Galinsky. “Enclothed Cognition.” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 48, no. 4 (2012): 918– 25.no. 4 (2012): 918– 25.  Arnott, S. (2005). The Accelerative Integrated Method: A descriptive case study. Published MA thesis ofArnott, S. (2005). The Accelerative Integrated Method: A descriptive case study. Published MA thesis of Education , Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, University of Toronto.Education , Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, University of Toronto.  Baldwin, P. (2004). With Drama in Mind. Stafford, UK: Network Educational Press.Baldwin, P. (2004). With Drama in Mind. Stafford, UK: Network Educational Press.  CHILD Covenant. (2012) Available at: http://www.cfed.co/cfee/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/PSP2012-CHILD Covenant. (2012) Available at: http://www.cfed.co/cfee/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/PSP2012- CHILD-COVENANT.pdfCHILD-COVENANT.pdf [Accessed 22/03/15][Accessed 22/03/15]  Cummins,J..and Swain, M.(1996). Bilingualism in Education. London and New York: LongmanCummins,J..and Swain, M.(1996). Bilingualism in Education. London and New York: Longman  Fisher, R. (1998). Teaching Children to Think. Newcastle, UK: Stanley Thornes.Fisher, R. (1998). Teaching Children to Think. Newcastle, UK: Stanley Thornes.  Diaz Rico, L.T. (2007).Diaz Rico, L.T. (2007). Reimagining second language acquisition as Performative Practice in Jun Liu (Ed.)Reimagining second language acquisition as Performative Practice in Jun Liu (Ed.) English Language Teaching in China: New Approaches, Perspectives and Standards (pp. 91-106), London,English Language Teaching in China: New Approaches, Perspectives and Standards (pp. 91-106), London, UK: Continuum International Publishing group.UK: Continuum International Publishing group.  Heathcote, D. Ed. Johnson L and O’Neill Cecily. (1984). Collected Writings on Education and Drama. Illinois:Heathcote, D. Ed. Johnson L and O’Neill Cecily. (1984). Collected Writings on Education and Drama. Illinois: NWU Press.NWU Press.  Hillyard, S. (2015).Hillyard, S. (2015). The Profile and Practice of Fifteen Teachers working in English in Action. ChallengingThe Profile and Practice of Fifteen Teachers working in English in Action. Challenging ELT Practices in SEN Education.ELT Practices in SEN Education. Cited in Giannikas, C.N.; McLaughlin, L., Fanning, G. & Deutsch Muller,Cited in Giannikas, C.N.; McLaughlin, L., Fanning, G. & Deutsch Muller, N. (Eds.). Children Learning English: from research to practice.  Reading, UK: Garnet Publishing Ltd.N. (Eds.). Children Learning English: from research to practice.  Reading, UK: Garnet Publishing Ltd.
  38. 38.  Hillyard, S. (2012).Hillyard, S. (2012). Creating an Inclusive Learning Experience for English Language Learners with Specific Needs. CaseCreating an Inclusive Learning Experience for English Language Learners with Specific Needs. Case Study 6Study 6 Available at:Available at: [Accessed 22/03/15][Accessed 22/03/15] www.teachingenglish.org.uk/sites/teacheng/files/B480_Specialwww.teachingenglish.org.uk/sites/teacheng/files/B480_Special %20Need_Publication_A4_V5_Final_MR.pdf%20Need_Publication_A4_V5_Final_MR.pdf  Jarvis, P.Jarvis, P. Paradoxes of Learning: On Becoming an Individual in SocietyParadoxes of Learning: On Becoming an Individual in Society (1992). California: Josey-Bass Inc.(1992). California: Josey-Bass Inc.  Johnson, L., & O’Neill, C. (Eds.). (1984).Johnson, L., & O’Neill, C. (Eds.). (1984). Dorothy Heathcote’s Collected Writings on Education and Drama.Dorothy Heathcote’s Collected Writings on Education and Drama. Evanston,Evanston, IL: Northwestern.IL: Northwestern.  Kolb, D.A. (1984).Kolb, D.A. (1984). Experiential Learning.Experiential Learning. New Jersey, USA: Prentice Hall Inc.New Jersey, USA: Prentice Hall Inc.  Krashen, S. (1982).Krashen, S. (1982). Principles andPrinciples and Practice of Second Language Acquisition.Practice of Second Language Acquisition. Available at:Available at: http://www.sdkrashen.com/content/books/principles_and_practice.pdfhttp://www.sdkrashen.com/content/books/principles_and_practice.pdf [Accessed 22/03/15][Accessed 22/03/15]  Krashen, S., & Bland, J.(2014). Compelling Comprehensible Input, Academic Language and School Libraries.Krashen, S., & Bland, J.(2014). Compelling Comprehensible Input, Academic Language and School Libraries. CLELE Journal,CLELE Journal, 2 (2) : 1-12 Available at:2 (2) : 1-12 Available at: http://clelejournal.org/article-1-2/http://clelejournal.org/article-1-2/ [Accessed 22/03/15][Accessed 22/03/15]  Lozanov, S. Suggestopaedia (1978) Available at:Lozanov, S. Suggestopaedia (1978) Available at: http://www.learningdoorway.com/georgi-lozanov.htmlhttp://www.learningdoorway.com/georgi-lozanov.html [Accessed 22/03/15][Accessed 22/03/15]  Maxwell W. (2004). The Accelerated Integrated Method: a holistic approach to the teaching of French as aMaxwell W. (2004). The Accelerated Integrated Method: a holistic approach to the teaching of French as a second language. Réflexions. second language. Réflexions. J. Can. Assoc. Sec. Lang. Teach.J. Can. Assoc. Sec. Lang. Teach.AvailableAvailable at: at: http://www.caslt.org/resources/french-sl/research-articles-core-french_aim_en.phphttp://www.caslt.org/resources/french-sl/research-articles-core-french_aim_en.php  O’Neill, C. (2014).O’Neill, C. (2014). Dorothy Heathcote on Education and Drama: Essential writingsDorothy Heathcote on Education and Drama: Essential writings London: RoutledgeLondon: RoutledgeKao, S. M. andKao, S. M. and O’Neill C. (1998)O’Neill C. (1998) Words into Worlds: Learning a Second Language Through Process Drama.Words into Worlds: Learning a Second Language Through Process Drama. London: JAI Press LtdLondon: JAI Press Ltd.. UK: Open University Press.UK: Open University Press.  O’Neill, C. and Lambert, P. (1982).O’Neill, C. and Lambert, P. (1982). Drama StructuresDrama Structures. Cheltenham, UK: Nelson Thornes.. Cheltenham, UK: Nelson Thornes.  Ponniah, R. J. & Krashen, S. (2008). The Expanded Output HypothesisPonniah, R. J. & Krashen, S. (2008). The Expanded Output Hypothesis IJFELT Journal Fall 2008 :IJFELT Journal Fall 2008 :2-32-3 AvailableAvailable at:at: http://www.tprstories.com/ijflt/IJFLTfall08.pdfhttp://www.tprstories.com/ijflt/IJFLTfall08.pdf [Accessed 22/03/15][Accessed 22/03/15]  Vygotsky, L. S. (1980).Vygotsky, L. S. (1980). Mind in SocietyMind in Society. Stamford, USA: Harvard University Press.. Stamford, USA: Harvard University Press.  Wilkinson, J. A. (2000).Wilkinson, J. A. (2000). The Power of Drama in English Language Learning: The Research Evidence.The Power of Drama in English Language Learning: The Research Evidence. CEO WorldCEO World Wellness Inc. The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of The University of Toronto. Available at:Wellness Inc. The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of The University of Toronto. Available at: http://etlc.wtuc.edu.tw/quarterly/Q-27.htmhttp://etlc.wtuc.edu.tw/quarterly/Q-27.htm [Accessed 22/03/15][Accessed 22/03/15] 
  39. 39. Thank you!!!Thank you!!! British CouncilBritish Council Susan HillyardSusan Hillyard ssnhillyard@gmail.comssnhillyard@gmail.com http://susanhillyard.blogspot.com.ar/http://susanhillyard.blogspot.com.ar/

×