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Lesson #1 Credit to Learn Alberta<br />How can I plan my lessons using the Backwards Approach?<br />Identify the outcomes ...
Grade 4 fractions lesson1
Grade 4 fractions lesson1
Grade 4 fractions lesson1
Grade 4 fractions lesson1
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Grade 4 fractions lesson1

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Grade 4 fractions lesson1

  1. 1. Lesson #1 Credit to Learn Alberta<br />How can I plan my lessons using the Backwards Approach?<br />Identify the outcomes to be learned<br />Guiding Questions<br />What do I want my students to learn? <br />What can my students currently understand and do? <br />What do I want my students to understand and be able to do, based on the Big Ideas and specific outcomes in the program of studies?<br />Cut and paste your outcome(s) here.<br />N4.6 Demonstrate an understanding of fractions less than or equal to one by using concrete and pictorial<br />representations to:<br />• name and record fractions for the parts of a whole or set<br />• compare and order fractions<br />• model and explain that for different wholes two identical fractions may not represent the same quantity<br />• provide examples of where fractions are used<br />*Provide examples of when two identical fractions may not represent the same quantity (e.g., half of a large apple is not equivalent to half of a small apple; half a group of ten cloudberries is not equivalent to half of a group of sixteen cloudberries).<br />I find this interesting to assess students in the area of communication and connections.<br /><ul><li>Now that I have listed my outcome:</li></ul>Determine how the learning will be observed<br />Guiding Questions<br />What evidence will I look for to know that learning has occurred? <br />What should students demonstrate to show their understanding of the mathematical concepts, skills and Big Ideas?<br />What will the children do to know that the learning has occurred?<br />What should children do to demonstrate the understanding of the mathematical concepts, skills, and big ideas?<br />What assessment tools will be the most suitable to provide evidence of student understanding? How can I document the children’s learning?<br />Achievement Indicators:<br />Provide examples of when two identical fractions may not represent the same quantity; e.g., half of a large apple is not equivalent to half of a small apple; half of ten Saskatoon berries is not equivalent to half of sixteen Saskatoon berries.<br />Create your assessment tools before you create your lesson task.<br />Entrance Slip:<br /> Relating Fractional Parts of Wholes and SetsNot Yet AdequateAdequateProficientExcellentModel examples of two identical fractions that do not represent the same amount<br />--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br />Relating Fractional Parts of Wholes and SetsNot Yet AdequateAdequateProficientExcellentModel examples of two identical fractions that do not represent the same amount<br />Relating Fractional Parts of Wholes and SetsNot Yet AdequateAdequateProficientExcellentModel examples of two identical fractions that do not represent the same amount<br />Relating Fractional Parts of Wholes and SetsNot Yet AdequateAdequateProficientExcellentModel examples of two identical fractions that do not represent the same amount<br />Relating Fractional Parts of Wholes and SetsNot Yet AdequateAdequateProficientExcellentModel examples of two identical fractions that do not represent the same amount<br />Relating Fractional Parts of Wholes and SetsNot Yet AdequateAdequateProficientExcellentModel examples of two identical fractions that do not represent the same amount<br />Plan the learning environment and instruction<br />Guiding Questions<br />What learning opportunities and experiences should I provide to promote learning of the outcomes and permit students to demonstrate their learning? <br />What teaching strategies and resources should I use? <br />How will I meet the diverse learning needs of my students? <br />What learning opportunities and experiences should I provide to promote the learning outcomes?<br />What will the learning environment look like?<br />What strategies do children use to access prior knowledge and continually communicate and represent understanding?<br />What teaching strategies and resources will I use?<br />How can I differentiate the lesson to challenge all students at their learning ability? How will I integrate technology, communication, mental math, reasoning, visualization, etc into this lesson? (7 Processes) Look at your outcomes to see which of the processes you should be including.<br />Plan your lesson here: What lesson format will you use?<br /> BEFORE-DURING-AFTER? Math PODS? ETC.<br />Before introducing new material, consider ways to assess and build on the students' knowledge and skills related to fractions. <br />Provide examples of when two identical fractions may not represent the same quantity (e.g., half of a large apple is not equivalent to half of a small apple; half a group of ten cloudberries is not equivalent to half of a group of sixteen cloudberries).<br />I find this interesting to assess students in the area of communication and connections<br />Present the following situation to the students:<br />Tara ate one-half of her licorice and Ben ate one-half of his licorice. Tara said that she ate more licorice than Ben. Explain how Tara could be right by using diagrams and words.<br />Adapted from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Principles and Standards for School Mathematics (Reston, VA: The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2000), p. 199. Adapted with permission of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.<br />Look ForDo students:provide everyday contexts to show that the same fraction may not represent the same quantity for different wholes?critique fallacies about fractions by drawing diagrams and using arguments that are mathematically sound? <br />Assess student learning and follow up<br />Guiding Questions<br />What conclusions can be made from assessment information? <br />How effective have instructional approaches been? <br />What are the next steps in instruction?<br />What conclusions can be made from assessment information?<br />How effective have instructional strategies been?<br />What are the next steps for instruction?<br />How will the gaps in the development of understanding be addressed?<br />How will the children extend their learning?<br />If the following strip represents of a licorice, draw a diagram to show the length of the entire licorice. Explain your thinking.<br />Name:_________________________ Date: _________<br />Tara ate one-half of her licorice and Ben ate one-half of his licorice. Tara said that she ate more licorice than Ben. Explain how Tara could be right by using diagrams and words.<br /> <br />

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