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Survey Design Webinar: Proven
Methodologies for Surveys That Work
Greg Timpany Anup Surendran
Vice President, Product & EngineeringSenior Research Director, Global Knowledge;
Partner with ...
#SurveyDesignTips
What’s on the agenda today?
● How to Identify the Need
● Why do You Want to Run a Survey
● How to Design a Survey that Doe...
All Is Not What You See
Photo by Uri Golman
The root cause of business
issues often lie below the
surface.
Management may ...
Identifying the Need
● Research does not thrive if it is kept in a
vacuum
● Look below the surface
● Query clients in orde...
It All Starts With a Plan
Source: Research Rockstar
Do we really need a survey?
Secondary Research
Pros
● Can be less costly in terms of
time and budget
● Leverages the work ...
Why do you want to run a survey?
If secondary research including: online search,
published reports, or an examination of e...
Hey! What about qualitative research?QuantitativeQualitative
Designing a survey that works!
● Know your intended audience
● Know the overarching research questions
that need to be ans...
Survey Flow
Surveys have distinct blocks designed to
guide the respondent through the process.
For example:
Respondents wh...
Survey Blocks
● Introduction:
○ Survey duration - give respondent’s a realistic time estimate
○ Remind them their opinions...
Question Types - Single Select
Multiple Choice (Single Select):
Asks respondents to select a single category. This is
a go...
Question Types - Multiple Response
Multiple Choice (Select all that apply):
Asks respondents to select all options that ap...
Question Types - Matrix or Grid
Matrix or Grid:
Useful for Likert-style questions as well as ratings. Items for considerat...
Question Types - Matrix or Grid
Question Types - Rank Order
Rank Order:
Requires that the respondent order their selections
based on some metric such as p...
Question Types - Constant Sum
Constant Sum:
Requires that the respondent allocate a series of
points, typically adding up ...
Question Types - Image Choice
Selecting images:
Requires the respondent to select or rate an image or
images.
Keynotes:
● ...
Question Types - Open-Ends
Capturing Text:
Requires respondents to share thoughts in their own words.
Keynotes:
● Comes in...
Question Types - Advanced Questions
Keynotes:
● Customer satisfaction can be measured
using the Net Promoter Score questio...
Formatting Considerations
● Lists vs. Dropdowns
● Branded vs. Blind
● Number of Questions per Page
● Fonts
● Use of Space
...
Formatting Considerations - Mobile
● Readability
○ use mid-length scales (3 - 5 points) and avoid the
need to pinch or zoo...
Traps to Avoid
● Managing Time
● Leading the Respondent
● Double-barreled Questions
● Insensitivity
● Overlapping Categori...
Thank You
Contact Information
For more info, please contact us at
​Greg Timpany
greg@anovamarketresearch.com
919-673-0795
...
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Survey Design Webinar

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Learn The Best Practices of Survey Design by designing the survey you want to meet your market research needs.

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Survey Design Webinar

  1. 1. Survey Design Webinar: Proven Methodologies for Surveys That Work
  2. 2. Greg Timpany Anup Surendran Vice President, Product & EngineeringSenior Research Director, Global Knowledge; Partner with Anova Market Research
  3. 3. #SurveyDesignTips
  4. 4. What’s on the agenda today? ● How to Identify the Need ● Why do You Want to Run a Survey ● How to Design a Survey that Does What You Want ● Turning Goals Into Real Survey Questions ● Collecting Answers to Your Carefully Crafted Questions ● Turning Resources into Insightful and Actionable Data
  5. 5. All Is Not What You See Photo by Uri Golman The root cause of business issues often lie below the surface. Management may see a decline in sales, but it is up to the researcher to isolate the cause.
  6. 6. Identifying the Need ● Research does not thrive if it is kept in a vacuum ● Look below the surface ● Query clients in order to understand what is known
  7. 7. It All Starts With a Plan Source: Research Rockstar
  8. 8. Do we really need a survey? Secondary Research Pros ● Can be less costly in terms of time and budget ● Leverages the work of other analysts Cons ● It was designed to meet someone else’s research needs and may not directly address your areas of interest Primary Research Pros ● Directly designed to answer your research questions ● Provides you maximum flexibility for analysis Cons ● Cost - primary projects typically cost more than secondary research, in terms of time and budget
  9. 9. Why do you want to run a survey? If secondary research including: online search, published reports, or an examination of existing in-house data will not allow you to answer your client’s questions then… It is time for a survey!
  10. 10. Hey! What about qualitative research?QuantitativeQualitative
  11. 11. Designing a survey that works! ● Know your intended audience ● Know the overarching research questions that need to be answered ● Balance the informational needs ● Respect the respondent’s time and willingness to share their opinions
  12. 12. Survey Flow Surveys have distinct blocks designed to guide the respondent through the process. For example: Respondents who do not meet screening criteria will be exited out. Non-purchasers may be sent down one branch, while purchasers sent down another. Judicious use of survey logic ensures that questions are appropriate for the type of respondent you are speaking to.
  13. 13. Survey Blocks ● Introduction: ○ Survey duration - give respondent’s a realistic time estimate ○ Remind them their opinions are secure ● Screeners: ○ Typical screeners include demographics (age, gender, region), level of responsibility or purchase ability (B2B), product/service usage, or brand/company awareness ○ Screeners are useful for establishing quotas ● Body ● Demographics ● Final Thoughts ● Redirects
  14. 14. Question Types - Single Select Multiple Choice (Single Select): Asks respondents to select a single category. This is a go to question type for survey designers. Keynotes: ● Keep category lists as brief as possible, preferably 5 - 9 items. ● Randomize to prevent order bias, unless your list is alphabetical, e.g. states, IT certifications, etc. or ranged, e.g. age and income. ● Can use drop down lists. ● Include “Other (please specify)” where appropriate.
  15. 15. Question Types - Multiple Response Multiple Choice (Select all that apply): Asks respondents to select all options that apply from a category list. Keynotes: ● Keep category lists as brief as possible, preferably 5 - 9 items. ● Randomize to prevent order bias. ● Remind respondents they can select all that apply. ● Make sure to include categories for “None” and “Other (please specify)” ● Serves a good input question for other types such as single select, rank order or constant sum. ● Each category is its own question. The sum of the number selected can serve as a segmentation.
  16. 16. Question Types - Matrix or Grid Matrix or Grid: Useful for Likert-style questions as well as ratings. Items for consideration are in the rows and rating scale in the columns. Keynotes: ● Keep item lists as brief as possible, preferably 5 - 9 items. If you are rating more items then consider formatting the list into multiple grids. ● Randomize items (rows) to prevent order bias. ● A/B test scale direction low to high vs. high to low. In the US we tend to think from low to high, but that may not be the case in international settings. ● Can be created side by side so both importance and satisfaction, for example, can be measured concurrently. ● Scaled questions, such as a feature’s perceived importance to the purchase decision, can be subjective. Consider rank order, constant sum or Max-Diff question types.
  17. 17. Question Types - Matrix or Grid
  18. 18. Question Types - Rank Order Rank Order: Requires that the respondent order their selections based on some metric such as preference. Keynotes: ● Keep items to be ranked as brief as possible, preferably 5 - 9 items. Respondents may have difficulty ranking more than this number of items. ● Randomize items to prevent order bias. ● Source data from a prior question, such as a multiple response, can be used to feed a rank order. ● Is less subjective than scaled questions. ● Creates ordinal data. ● Can use drag and drop (not advised for mobile)
  19. 19. Question Types - Constant Sum Constant Sum: Requires that the respondent allocate a series of points, typically adding up to 100, across items. Keynotes: ● Keep list as brief as possible, preferably 5 - 9 items. Respondents may have difficulty ranking more than this number of items. ● Randomize items to prevent order bias. ● Source data from a prior question, such as a multiple response, can be used to feed a constant sum. ● Works well when tied to a numeric question, such as amount spent during last shopping trip. ● Is less subjective than scaled questions. ● Creates metric data.
  20. 20. Question Types - Image Choice Selecting images: Requires the respondent to select or rate an image or images. Keynotes: ● Great for soliciting market feedback on corporate images, such as logos, or for providing a higher level of engagement using pictures that are common knowledge, such as a bowl of strawberries or a sports car. ● Ensure that your images are clear at various resolutions and can be seen on different devices.
  21. 21. Question Types - Open-Ends Capturing Text: Requires respondents to share thoughts in their own words. Keynotes: ● Comes in a few different flavors ● Where to place Open-Ends ● Should they be “required” ● Safe to use open-ended questions throughout the survey, after you have gotten through screeners.
  22. 22. Question Types - Advanced Questions Keynotes: ● Customer satisfaction can be measured using the Net Promoter Score question. ● Pricing can be addressed with the Van Westendorp price sensitivity model (PSM). ● Discrete choice or max-diff use cases can be leveraged with the conjoint models. ● Other options include the ability to generate heat maps, useful for testing visual imagery, and the opportunity for respondents to rate auditory or video content.
  23. 23. Formatting Considerations ● Lists vs. Dropdowns ● Branded vs. Blind ● Number of Questions per Page ● Fonts ● Use of Space ● Text
  24. 24. Formatting Considerations - Mobile ● Readability ○ use mid-length scales (3 - 5 points) and avoid the need to pinch or zoom ● Clickability ○ It’s easier to click with a mouse than with your thumb. Be generous when sizing response buttons ● Loadability ○ Keep your images smaller and use fewer of them. You can use more questions per page to reduce the number of pages to be loaded.
  25. 25. Traps to Avoid ● Managing Time ● Leading the Respondent ● Double-barreled Questions ● Insensitivity ● Overlapping Categories ● Thinking Small ● It Doesn’t Apply ● Failure to Follow-Up ● Death By Grid
  26. 26. Thank You Contact Information For more info, please contact us at ​Greg Timpany greg@anovamarketresearch.com 919-673-0795 Anup Surendran anup.surendran@questionpro.com 512-590-3369 @questionpro

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