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Twitter for Archivists

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How archivists can utilize Twitter to promote their institutions and to enhance their professional relationships

Published in: Technology, Education, Career

Twitter for Archivists

  1. 1. When Archivists Lisa Grimm Drexel University College of Medicine lgrimm@drexelmed.edu
  2. 2. why? • What does it actually do? Isn’t it just like updating my Facebook status?
  3. 3. why? • What does it do? Isn’t it just like updating my Facebook status? • Not quite – it’s semi-officially known as ‘microblogging.’
  4. 4. what? • Microblogging? What does that actually mean?
  5. 5. what? • Microblogging? What does that actually mean? • In a nutshell: it means you have room for 140 characters per message.
  6. 6. why again? • So I have to talk about myself for 140 characters? How does this exercise in vanity help my archives or extend my professional relationships?
  7. 7. why? Here’s the secret: it’s all in how you do it. Consider a few basic uses: 1) Promote your workplace’s website or blog 2) Garner feedback from other archivists 3) Maintain your professional profile
  8. 8. how Sounds easy enough. How do I get started? 1) Start at Twitter.com and create an account – either a personal or ‘corporate’ account (or both) 2) Find some fellow archivists to ‘follow’
  9. 9. how • But there’s no easy way to search for archivists!
  10. 10. how • But there’s no easy way to search for archivists! • True – but here are a few ways to get started:
  11. 11. how • Try search.twitter.com for ‘archivist’ or “#archives” • Follow an archivist you already know (try searching by their name) – and see if you like any of the people they are following (or who might be following them)
  12. 12. how
  13. 13. who • @adravan • @Jill_HW • @anarchivist • @librarycongress • @ArchivesGirl • @lisagrimm • @archivesopen • @lynnemthomas • @archivesnext • @MerrileeIAm • @amycsc • @Michigania • @BobRGarrett • @mike_rush • @dancohen • @nicolehgarrett • @dkemper • @publichistorian • @GetArchivisJobs • @RobinRKC • @helentaylor • @spellboundblog • Adapted from: http://is.gd/h5KO
  14. 14. how • But do I have to keep going back to Twitter.com to read all these updates?
  15. 15. how • But do I have to keep going back to Twitter.com to read all these updates? • Nope – there are a lot of handy time-saving Twitter-related tools.
  16. 16. how • Twitterfox – shows • Splitweet – Manage new tweets in a separate accounts browser extension • Twitterfeed – ‘feed’ • TwitterSheep – see your blog directly to who is following you Twitter • TwitPic – Share photos on Twitter • GroupTweet – send a • Twitterific – tweet private message to a from your iPhone group on Twitter • is.gd – URL shortener • TweetDeck – sort tweets by topic/group
  17. 17. lingo • Hashtag – tool to • Tweet – Send a message track keywords or activities, e.g. • RT – re-tweet – repost #archives a message from another user • @reply – A response to something you • DM – Direct message have posted
  18. 18. tips • Username/handle: Having your own name doesn’t hurt • Tone: Consider whether you can express sarcasm or excitement in 140 characters • Audience: Remember that anyone could be your ‘follower’
  19. 19. resources • http://www.twitter.com • http://hashtags.org/ • http://twitter.pbwiki.com/ • http://twittgroups.com/group/archives

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