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Skills australia annual_report_2011_2012

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Skills Australia Annual Report 2012

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Skills australia annual_report_2011_2012

  1. 1. Annual Report 2011-12
  2. 2. Annual Report 2011-12
  3. 3. ISSN: 1836-4748 © Commonwealth of Australia 2012 With the exception of the Commonwealth Coast of Arms, the Department’s logo, any material protected by a trade mark and where otherwise noted all material presented in this document is under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au) licence. The details of the relevant licence conditions are available on the Creative Commons website (accessible using the links provided) as is the full legal code for the CC BY 3.0 AU licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/legalcode). The document must be attributed as the Skills Australia Annual Report 2011-12.
  4. 4. Senator the Hon Christopher Evans Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Science and Research Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600 Dear Minister Re: Skills Australia—Annual Report I have pleasure in submitting the Annual Report of Skills Australia for the period 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012, in accordance with section 27 of the Skills Australia Act 2008 (the Act) which requires that Skills Australia prepare and provide to you a report on Skills Australia’s operations during the financial year. Yours sincerely Philip Bullock Chair October 2012 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 1
  5. 5. Chair’s Review 4 Skills Australia Mission and Function 6 Skills Australia Board 7 Skills Australia Secretariat 12 Strategic Priority 1: Current and emerging skills needs 15 National Workforce Development Strategy and Scenario Development 15 Resources Sector Skills Needs 17 Defence Industry Workforce Strategy 18 Skilled Occupations List (SOL) for independent skilled migration 18 2 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 Skills Australia and Industry Skills Councils joint conference 19 SCOTESE Industry Forum – Meeting skills needs in regional Australia 19 Strategic Priority 2: Workforce development and better utilisation of skills 20 Strategic Industry Forum – Planning for Workforce Development 20 Better Use of Skills 20 Related activities during 2011-2012 21 Strategic Priority 3: Ongoing reforms to the Tertiary Education System 22 Implementation of Skills Australia recommendations 22 Table of contents
  6. 6. Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 3 SCOTESE Industry Forum – industry priorities for VET reform 22 Research projects 23 Related achievements during 2011-12 24 Strategic Priority 4: Transition to the new National Workforce and Productivity Agency 25 Strategic focus 25 Operational focus 26 Strategic Priority 5: Stakeholder Engagement 27 Skills Australia Stakeholders 27 Engagement strategies 27 Dissemination 29 Ministerial Directions 32 Future Directions 32 Skills Australia Board 33 Board Meetings 33 Management and Accountability 34 Contacting Skills Australia 35
  7. 7. Chair’s Review 4 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  8. 8. It gives me great pleasure to present Skills Australia’s fifth annual report. During 2011-2012 the Government announced an expansion of our responsibilities to further expand our research capability, especially around productivity, the future of work and more specific sectoral-based research. We also provide oversight of the National Workforce Development Fund, while continuing to provide policy recommendations regarding skills and workforce development. From 1 July 2012, Skills Australia transitioned to the Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency. Due to this development, this annual report, therefore, is the last one as Skills Australia and the first to include work of the new Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency. 2011-2012 has been a busy and productive year for Skills Australia. We have monitored and continued to promote the take up of our recommendations from our major reports of previous years (Australian Workforce Futures and Skills for Prosperity) and it has been pleasing to see that so many of our recommendations have gained the support of industry and a broad range of stakeholders and hence helped shape VET reform as enacted by Governments. Increasingly we have been asked to provide detailed sector-based reports. While we provide a framework and methodology, we can only deliver critical insights through the cooperation and guidance of leading sector players. This year, we were asked to provide reviews of the Resources and Defence sectors and the likely impacts on skills and workforce development. Immigration continues to play a key role in the development of a skills and labour base for Australia. To assist in this process, Skills Australia, for the third year, has provided a list of 192 Specialised Occupations which help form a base for the General Skilled Migration program, administered by the Department of Immigration and Citizenship. While planning for skills is essential, great advances in productivity are able to be achieved via improved skills utilisation. To provide some local examples, we disseminated widely the outcomes of case studies we conducted with 11 Australian businesses to find out more about strategies they have used to better utilise the skills of their workforces. To further drive the “skills” agenda, we held a major conference, “Putting skills at the heart of the economy” and hosted forums with Ministers and key industry stakeholders on workforce development, regional skills needs and priorities for VET reform. Significant effort has also been dedicated to progressing important work for next year. For example, we have continued to work with futurists, economic modellers and researchers and conducted consultations to help shape a scenario- based national workforce development strategy, which we plan to finalise by the end of 2012. As part of our new remit, we have provided advice to Government on priority areas for the allocation of National Workforce Development Funds and we have devoted time to planning for the transition to the new Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency. We are also preparing to hold our second major national conference in partnership with Industry Skills Councils on the topic of “The Future of Work – Developing Australia’s Workforce in a Global economy” in October 2012. Our ability to operate as an independent and expert body that provides advice to Government is due to the commitment and passion of the Board, the dedication of the CEO and Secretariat as well as the continual advice, feedback and robust discussion with our key stakeholders. These stakeholders include a strong network of colleagues in industry and enterprises as well as the tertiary sector, the professions, government agencies, research bodies, providers and the community. Our work could not have been done without their invaluable support and hence we are truly thankful for the time and effort they invest. We look forward to continuing to work with them as we transition to the Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency. Philip Bullock Chair Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 5
  9. 9. Skills Australia is an independent statutory body, providing advice to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Science and Research on Australia’s current, emerging and future workforce skills needs and workforce development needs. Skills Australia’s advice covers a broad range of areas that affect the demand, supply and utilisation of skills. This year our work has touched upon but not been limited to migration, the tertiary education system, the resources sector and the effective use of skills in the workplace. Skills Australia’s key functions are to: • assess current and emerging skills needs across industry sectors; • assess evidence from commissioned research and industry stakeholders to inform Australia’s skills and workforce development needs; • distribute information from research and consultations with stakeholders widely to enable entrepreneurs, businesses and workers to have the necessary information to inform their training and employment decisions; • provide government with recommendations on current and future skills needs to help inform decisions to encourage skills formation Skills Australia Mission and Function and drive ongoing reforms to the education and training sector; and • establish and maintain relationships with relevant state bodies to inform advice on current and future demands for skills and facilitate alignment of priorities for responses to skills needs. The 2010-11 Budget announced the expansion of the role of Skills Australia through the establishment of the National Workforce and Productivity Agency to commence from 1 July 2012. One of the Agency’s key roles is to administer a new National Workforce Development Fund, an investment of $700 million over five years, so that businesses can co-invest with government to train current and prospective workers. Subsequently in September 2011, Minister Evans announced the interim Board of the Agency, which saw the current Board membership expand from 7 to 10 members. The interim Board began on 1 October 2011, nine months ahead of the scheduled start date for the new Agency in July 2012. The key focus of the Board during the period 1 October 2011 to 30 June 2012 was to provide advice on priority areas for workforce development funding and to prepare for the transition to the Agency on 1 July 2012. The mission of Skills Australia is to provide independent and high quality advice to ensure the government’s investment in education and training promotes the development of a highly skilled workforce, increases workforce participation (especially among less advantaged groups), meets the needs of industry and increases Australia’s productivity. 6 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  10. 10. On 21 September 2011, Minister Evans, announced that new members would join Skills Australia to form an interim Board of the new Agency. The interim Board comprised an eminent group of ten experts from a diverse range of backgrounds with a breadth of knowledge and experience in academia, the provision of education and training, economics and industry. Skills Australia Board Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 7
  11. 11. Mr Philip Bullock – Chair Philip Bullock (Chair) brings high level leadership skills, a strong industry background and a commitment to education and training to the position of Chair of Skills Australia. He has over 25 years’ experience working with IBM, culminating in his appointment as Vice President, Systems and Technology Group IBM Asia Pacific Region. Prior to this Mr Bullock was CEO of IBM Australia and New Zealand. Philip is currently a non-executive director of Perpetual Limited, a provider of financial services and CSG Limited, an IT and print services company. He was previously a non-executive director of Healthscope Limited. Professor Gerald Burke Professor Gerald Burke was formerly executive director and a professorial fellow in the Monash University-ACER Centre for the Economics of Education and Training (CEET) and now has an adjunct appointment as professor in education at Monash. From 2007 to 2010 he was a member of the Victorian Registration and Qualifications Authority. From 2004 to 2007 he was Chair of the Victorian Qualifications Authority, a member of the Victorian Learning and Employment Skills Commission and the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority. He is a member of the editorial Board of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER). Skills Australia Board Mr Peter Anderson Peter Anderson is Chief Executive of the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI) where he is responsible for management, strategy and national and international advocacy on behalf of State and Territory Chambers of Commerce and affiliated Industry Associations. Peter has over twenty-five years of experience at the forefront of policy and advocacy in both private and public sectors. Prior to joining ACCI he held senior roles including: Executive-Director of the Retail Traders’ Association of South Australia; Partner of leading commercial law firm Fisher Jeffries; Chief of Staff to former South Australian Premier the Hon. Dean Brown and Senior Adviser to Commonwealth Employment and Workplace Ministers. In 2011 he was a member of the Government’s Business Roundtable on Climate Change. Peter is the Australian business representative at regional and global forums such as the OECD, the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organisation of Employers, and the International Labour Organisation. He is also a Director of the Australian Made, Australian Grown Campaign and the International Institute for Labour Studies. 8 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  12. 12. Dr John Edwards Dr John Edwards is a Visiting Fellow at the Lowy Institute, an Adjunct Professor with the John Curtin Institute of Public Policy at Curtin University, and a member of the Board of the Reserve Bank of Australia. From 2009 to 2011 he was Director for Economic Planning and Development for the Economic Development Board of the Kingdom of Bahrain. From 1997 to 2009 he was Chief Economist for Australia and New Zealand for the global financial group, HSBC. From 1991 to 1994 he was principal economic adviser to the Treasurer and then Prime Minister, Paul Keating. Earlier in his career he was a political and economic journalist in Sydney, Canberra, and Washington. From 1994 Dr Edwards was an adviser at Macquarie Bank, and then Chief Economist for Société Generale in Australia, before joining HSBC. From 1994 to 1996 he was also appointed by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs as Adviser to the Australian member of the APEC Eminent Persons Group and to the Australian members of the APEC Business Advisory Council. Mr Paul Howes Paul Howes has more than a decade of union activism behind him – as an ordinary union member, a union delegate, working for a peak trade union body and as an AWU official. At the age of 17, Paul became a Research Officer with the Labor Council of NSW. Paul worked closely with the AWU in organising workers at the Sydney 2000 Olympics, and in 2002 as an official with the New South Wales Branch of the union. In 2003, Paul joined the AWU National Office as National Organiser and organised the Aluminium, Mining and Steel industries for the union across the country. In 2005, Paul was elected National Vice President, and was elected National Secretary in 2007 and was re-elected in 2009. He was elected Vice President of the Australian Council of Trade Unions in 2008. He is a member of the National Executive of the Australian Labor Party and represents the Asia-Pacific Region as a member of the Executive Committee of the International Metalworkers’ Federation. He is a Director of Australian Super, is also a Director of The McKell Institute and a member of a number of Government Boards. Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 9
  13. 13. Skills Australia Board Dr Michael Keating AC Dr Michael Keating AC is a member of the South Australian Training and Skills Commission, the South Australian Economic Development Board, and Chair of the Community and Clinicians Expert Advisory Council for Health in NSW. Dr Keating is a former Secretary of the federal departments of Prime Minister and Cabinet, Finance, and Employment and Industrial Relations. He is a fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the Institute of Public Administration Australia. Ms Marie Persson Marie Persson has broad experience in government policy, education and training reform, organisational development and leadership and management. Ms Persson has held senior executive positions in the Australian public sector at state and national levels for over 20 years. From 2005 to 2010 she was the head of NSW TAFE and Community Education. Ms Persson is the recipient of the NSW Telstra Business Woman of the Year Award (2003), the Australian Telstra Community and Government Award (2003) and the International Literacy Year medal (1990). She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management and has served on many boards including: the NSW Board of Studies, the YWCA, the NSW TAFE Commission, the LH Martin Institute and the Australian Government’s Expert panel on Australian Apprenticeships. Ms Ged Kearney Gerardine (Ged) Kearney commenced as ACTU President on 1 July 2010 following the departure of Sharan Burrow. Ged’s ambition as ACTU President is to build respect from political leaders and the broad community for the values of fairness and role played by unions in delivering social change so that people feel the need to join. Ged was elected the Federal Secretary of the Australian Nursing Federation in April 2008. As a registered nurse she has worked in many settings across the public and the private sectors. She has also been a nursing educator, including manager of the Clinical Nursing Education Department at Austin Health. 10 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  14. 14. Mr Keith Spence Keith Spence is Chair of the WA State Training Board which provides policy advice to the Minister for Training and Workforce Development in Western Australia. Keith has over 30 years’ experience in the oil and gas industry, including 18 years with Shell and 14 years with Woodside. Mr Spence held many roles during his period with Woodside, including Chief Operating Officer, Acting Chief Executive Officer, Director Oil Business Unit, Director Northern Business Unit and Exploration Manager North West Shelf. Most recently, he was Executive Vice President Enterprise Capability. Keith is a member of the National Carbon Capture and Storage Council and Chairs the Board of the National Offshore Petroleum Safety Authority, the Australian Institute of Management (WA), and the Industry Advisory Board of the Australian Centre for Energy and Process Training. He is a member of the Curtin University council, a Non-Executive Chairman of Clough Limited and Geodynamics Limited and a Non-Executive Director of Verve Energy. Mrs Heather Ridout Heather Ridout is a Company Director and Reserve Bank Board member with a long history as a leading figure in the public policy debate in Australia. Heather is a Director of AustralianSuper – the largest industry fund in Australia and a Director of Sims Metal Management – the world’s largest publicly listed recycling company. Her other appointments include membership of the Advance Australia Advisory Board. Up until 30 April 2012, Heather was Chief Executive of the Australian Industry Group – a major, national employer organisation representing a cross section of industry including manufacturing, defence, ICT and labour hire. Her previous appointments include: member of the Henry Tax Review panel; Board member of Infrastructure Australia; member of the Business Roundtable on Climate Change; member of the National Workplace Relations Consultative Committee; and member of the Prime Minister’s Taskforce on Manufacturing. Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 11
  15. 15. Skills Australia Secretariat Skills Australia is supported by a Secretariat, which is responsible for management and provision of resources to facilitate its work. The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Skills Australia is Robin Shreeve and he is supported by the Head of Secretariat and a team of 5 Directors. As at 30 June 2012, there were 31 full-time staff working in the Secretariat. Mr Robin Shreeve – Skills Australia CEO Mr Robin Shreeve began his role with Skills Australia in October 2009 and is based in Sydney. Robin has worked in the skills sector for more than 30 years in Australia and England. Robin has been the Chief Executive of two large Tertiary Institutions – one in Australia, the North Coast Institute of TAFE and one in Westminster, Central London. For different periods between 1989 and 2005 Robin worked for the Department of Education and Training in New South Wales. His final position was Deputy Director-General for Technical, Further and Community Education. Robin has also been a Board Director for a number of organisations including the NSW Board of Studies, AeSharenet, Worldskills Australia, TAFE Global Pty Ltd, the Paddington Development Trust, the London Apprenticeship Company and the Westminster Small Minority Business Council. Robin holds degrees from the Universities of York and Sheffield and has spoken and published widely on vocational education and training and marketing topics. 12 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  16. 16. Organisational Structure Skills Australia Board CEO Head of Secretariat Director Secretariat and Communications Director Resources Skills Analysis and Defence Material Workforce Director Skills and Workforce Development Policy Director Labour Market Information Director Skills and Provider Policy Secretariat and Communications Main area of responsibility: Providing secretariat support to the Board, managing major events and implementing the Skills Australia communications strategy. Labour Market Information Main area of responsibility: Providing advice on national skills needs via the Skilled Occupations List and the Specialised Occupations List. Resources Skills Analysis Main area of responsibility: Providing advice on resources sector skills needs and producing the annual report on the resources sector. Defence Materiel Workforce Main area of responsibility: Providing advice on defence industry skills needs and producing a report on defence industry skills needs. Skills and Provider Policy Main area of responsibility: Providing advice on the Tertiary Education System and the supply of skills and qualifications. Skills and Workforce Development Policy Main area of responsibility: Providing advice on the national workforce development strategy and undertaking research into skills utilisation. 1 2 3 4 5 6 The CEO and Head of Secretariat report directly to the Board. They are supported by the following teams: Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 13
  17. 17. Strategic Priorities Skills Australia’s five strategic priorities as set out in the 2011 Business Plan are: 1 2 3 4 5 Analyse current and emerging skills needs in the Australian economy and provide the Government with recommendations on current and future skills needs and skills development. Develop advice and strategies on workforce development and better utilisation of skills in the workplace to improve productivity. Recommend and drive ongoing reforms to the Tertiary Education System (higher education and vocational education and training) including priorities for the investment of public funds and to ensure high quality outcomes for individuals. Plan for the transition to the new National Workforce and Productivity Agency. Engage with Skills Australia key stakeholders regularly and widely distribute outcomes of Skills Australia work to all stakeholders. The Board’s activities during 2011-12 have focused on achieving the objectives expressed through these priorities. This report highlights some of the key achievements. 14 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  18. 18. Strategic Priority 1: Analyse current and emerging skills needs in the Australian economy and provide the Government with recommendations on current and future skills needs and skills development. Key highlights: • Developed Scenarios for Australia to 2025 through significant research and stakeholder engagement including a joint forum with the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia • Published the 2011 Interim Report on Resources Sector Skills Needs • Published the Employment Growth Projections in Mining Operations, 2010-2016 • Published the Major Projects Schedule and Construction workforce estimates • Held a joint conference in 2011 with Industry Skills Councils, Putting skills at the heart of the economy • Published the Defence Industry Workforce Strategy – discussion paper and background paper • Hosted the fourth SCOTESE Industry Forum on meeting skills needs in regional Australia National Workforce Development Strategy and Scenario Development In preparation for the 2012 version of the National Workforce Development Strategy, Skills Australia developed four scenarios encompassing a range of plausible futures for Australia. The scenarios have been developed to help deal with the uncertainties involved in assessing future demand and supply of skills between now and 2025. The scenarios approach allows for alternative futures to be taken account of in economic modelling. After analysing uncertainties, differences and risks of the scenarios, we can help ensure that policy recommendations balance aspirational goals and risks. The scenarios are based around a number of economic, social, political and cultural drivers. Skills Australia began the scenario development work process in 2011 by inviting a series of experts from the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia (ASSA) to present scoping papers at a joint forum with the Academy. The forum discussed the following six key drivers which influence future needs of the workforce: 1. Economic and financial trends and globalisation (Dr David Gruen) 2. Social, demographic and cultural trends (Professor Graeme Hugo) 3. Labour force, industrial and workplace trends (Professor Sue Richardson) 4. Governance and public policy (Professor Glyn Davis and Dr Michael Keating) 5. Science, technology and innovation (Professor Anthony Arundel) 6. Sustainability (focus on water, energy, population) (Dr Kerry Schott) To support this work, a range of activities were undertaken during 2011-12 including: • Publication of Critical Issues Facing Australia to 2025: Summary of a Scenario Development Forum; • Expert interviews with 24 experts to inform the development of the scenarios; • Stakeholder workshops with participation of Industry Skills Councils, State Training Boards, education training providers, employers, unions and student representatives in Sydney and Melbourne to test the emerging issues; Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 15
  19. 19. • A webinar to provide information about the scenarios and the opportunity for questions and comments; • Futurists Susan Oliver and Peter Haywood were commissioned to develop scenarios; • Deloitte Access Economics were commissioned to model the economic implications of the scenarios; and • The project was oversighted by a Steering Committee including Skills Australia Board members and experts: Dr Glenn Withers, Professor Sue Richardson, Dr Tom Karmel, Mr Glenn Wightwick. The National Workforce Development Strategy will be provided to government by the end of 2012. Background The scenarios will inform economic modelling of the demand and supply of skills between now and 2025. Additionally, they will support the workforce development strategy due in 2012. The four scenarios are: • The Long Boom: characterised by strong prices for resources and high terms of trade • Smart Recovery: low growth to 2015 and a knowledge-based recovery • Terms of Trade Shock: resources prices fall and a broader based economy • Ring of Fire: Multiple shocks to the economy and the environment, a risky world Sustained prosperity and a restructured economy Risky world-multiple shocks Uncertainty to 2015 with low growth and knowledge-based recovery Resource prices fall, a more balanced economy 1 The Long Boom 4 Ring of Fire 2 Smart Recovery 3 Terms of Trade Shock 16 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  20. 20. Resources Sector Skills Needs Following the work of the National Resources Sector Employment Taskforce report Resourcing the Future, Skills Australia was asked to provide an annual report on the status of skills shortages in the resources sector. To oversee this work, Skills Australia established the Resources Sector Skills Needs Research 2011 Interim Report on Resources Sector Skill Needs This report examines current data concerning demand for skills from the resources sector and the supply of skills available to meet these needs. This report examines: • current and future major projects in Australia’s resources sector; • resources sector production and export outlook, by commodity, 2009 to 2016; • current economic trends and recent trends in the Australian labour market; • existing skill shortages and earning trends in occupations relevant to the resources sector; • trends in demand for labour in the resources sector; • the supply of skills available to meet industry skill needs; and • industry’s perspectives on future skill needs. Steering Committee to provide guidance on the scope and research methodology to be used to identify skills shortages for both the initial report and follow up reports. Membership of this committee comprised industry, government and peak bodies. During 2011-12 Skills Australia provided a number of updates to the work of the National Resources Sector Employment Taskforce workforce estimates. Employment Growth Projections in Mining Operations, 2010-2016 This report estimated potential employment growth in the mining operations sector by occupation from 2010 to 2016. Skills Australia identified that employment in mining operations is projected to grow substantially through to 2016, with the job growth most likely to be for machinery operators and drivers, followed by technicians and trade workers. Major Projects Schedule and Construction workforce estimates This paper provides an update on the work originally undertaken by the National Resources Sector Employment Taskforce by mapping the major resources and energy projects that are expected to be built over the next seven years, including their location and estimated construction and operation commencement dates. Skills Australia reports published Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 17
  21. 21. Defence Industry Workforce Strategy In September 2011, the Government asked Skills Australia to work with the Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) to prepare a comprehensive workforce development strategy for the Defence materiel supply industries. Defence procurement expenditure is expected to exceed $200 billion in current prices over the next 10 years due to planned enhancements of Defence capacity for Land, Air and Sea. Historically, around 53 per cent of Defence procurement expenditure has been provided to domestic suppliers. The aim of the strategy is to better position Australia’s Defence materiel industries to access the skilled workforce required to participate in opportunities for Australian Government Defence procurements. The task included developing a comprehensive workforce development plan taking into account trends in Defence procurement and the supply of and demand for skills to meet Australia’s Defence procurement needs. Skills Australia conducted national consultations on the Strategy in March 2012 and received a total of 29 public submissions. Skills Australia reports published Defence Industry Workforce Strategy – Background Paper Defence Industry Workforce Strategy – Discussion Paper Skilled Occupations List (SOL) for independent skilled migration In June 2012, the third annual Skilled Occupation List (SOL) was published. In developing its advice, Skills Australia analysed a wide range of education, employment, labour market and migration data, consulted with Industry Skills Councils, peak industry associations and a range of professional and trade associations, and considered 143 stakeholder submissions. In addition, consultations were held with stakeholders representing a number of individual occupations which provided valuable input to the process. In total there are 192 occupations on the 2012 SOL. There were minor changes to the 2011 SOL – four occupations added to the list and four occupations removed. This list is published on the Department of Immigration and Citizenship website and is available at www.immi.gov.au/ skilled/_pdf/sol-schedule1.pdf. 18 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  22. 22. Skills Australia and Industry Skills Councils joint conference Putting skills at the heart of the economy In July 2011 Skills Australia and the Industry Skills Councils held a joint conference in Melbourne. The theme of the conference was ‘Putting skills at the heart of the economy’. The conference attracted over 450 delegates and had a strong focus on analysing future skills needs from the national economic perspective. With a focus on the three Ps’ – Productivity, Participation and Population – the conference assembled the country’s foremost experts to discuss the skills challenge confronting Australia from the perspective of enterprises, employees, and training providers. SCOTESE Industry Forum – Meeting skills needs in regional Australia On 7 June 2012 Skills Australia hosted the fourth Standing Council on Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment (SCOTESE) Industry Forum: ‘Meeting skills needs in regional Australia’. Forum participants focused their discussion on three themes: 1. Planning for workforce development and collaborations Discussion focussed on workforce development and the society-wide impacts brought about by the structural changes in the economy. This in turn highlighted the need for an integrated suite of policies on migration, housing and community services in order to meet skills needs in regional Australia. 2. Partnerships between industry and schools Industry representatives highlighted the importance of being able to work in collaboration with schools and offer work placements in order to attract young people into the trades and other vocational occupations. 3. Improving employment prospects for Indigenous people The key message from industry representatives was that commitment, support and time put into skilling Indigenous people resulted in positive outcomes. A number of examples were provided of successful strategies being implemented by industry. Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 19
  23. 23. Strategic Priority 2: Develop advice and strategies on workforce development and better utilisation of skills in the workplace to improve productivity. Key highlights: • Hosted the fourth Strategic Industry Forum on planning for workforce development. • Published a case study booklet and a research report on Better use of skills, better outcomes. Strategic Industry Forum – Planning for Workforce Development Skills Australia facilitated the fourth Strategic Industry Forum on 22 July 2011 in Melbourne to discuss how to achieve a more collaborative approach between governments, industry, peak bodies and training providers to plan for workforce development. The forum chose to focus on the topic, planning for workforce development, in recognition that this is an activity that is happening at national, state, regional, industry and at the enterprise level and involves many players. This means there is potential for much duplication of effort and respondent burden on enterprises. However on the positive side there is commonality of purpose and opportunity for greater cooperation. It was felt that a more collaborative approach could ensure that planning for workforce development happens in Australia in a more integrated, efficient and effective way. To prepare for the Forum, two background papers were commissioned and published on the Skills Australia website: • Directions for workforce development planning (Allen Consulting Group) • Better Workforce Planning: Reflections on recent experiences in Norway, Singapore, the UK and the USA (Workplace Research Centre, University of Sydney). Better Use of Skills Skills Australia’s Australian Workforce Futures identified the need to better utilise skills as a critical element of future productivity and to increased employee engagement and satisfaction. 20 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  24. 24. Skills Australia reports published Better use of skills, better outcomes: Australian case studies In April 2012 Skills Australia published a case study booklet and a research report on Better use of skills, better outcomes. The booklet showcased 11 quality case studies and is an educative tool for enterprises wishing to improve productivity and employee job satisfaction through better use of skills. Better use of skills, better outcomes: A research report on skills utilisation in Australia In May 2012 Skills Australia published the research report containing a number of recommendations aimed at policy makers and academics, which seeks to support the wide promotion of better skills utilisation in Australian workplaces. Related activities during 2011-2012 • CEO Robin Shreeve continued to be a member of the Workforce Development, Supply and Demand Principal Committee of SCOTESE. This is one of four principal committees that report to SCOTESE. Robin has attended all meetings held this year and has kept the Committee informed of Skills Australia projects. • In May 2012, Skills Australia and the WA Department of Training and Workforce Development jointly organised a Workforce Development Planning Forum. Representatives from the Commonwealth and most States and Territories were in attendance. This group came together to discuss improving skills planning in contemporary Australia. A key proposal arising from the forum was to formalise a community of practice amongst those involved in workforce planning and planning for workforce development. • Publication of the report Crisis and Change in Ireland: the role of skills and innovation (Dr James Cunningham and Professor Roy Green). Over 6000 copies of the case study booklet and brochures promoting it were distributed through industry networks. In addition there have been articles published in magazines, blogs, and webinars to disseminate the findings. Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 21
  25. 25. Strategic Priority 3: Recommend and drive ongoing reforms to the Tertiary Education System (higher education and vocational education and training) including priorities for the investment of public funds and to ensure high quality outcomes for individuals. Key highlights: • Hosted the third SCOTESE Industry Forum, which focussed on industry priorities for VET reform • Commissioned research and reported on Quality Criteria for Registered Training Organisations • Hosted the Engineering Pathways Seminar Implementation of Skills Australia recommendations During 2011-12 Skills Australia monitored the take up of the recommendations made in two of its major reports: Australian Workforce Futures and Skills for Prosperity. A significant number of the Board’s recommendations have been implemented, including most of the key recommendations: • The Government has placed increased focus on workforce development through the introduction of the National Workforce Development Fund and the establishment of the Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency. • Increased tertiary enrolments are being achieved through the introduction of demand- based funding for Higher Education and COAG has recently agreed to introduce an entitlement system for VET with income contingent loans for higher level qualifications. • Quality of VET is being addressed through the Australian Skills Quality Authority, the National Skills Standards Council adoption of increased standards for VET practitioners, and COAG’s agreement to implement criteria specific standards for access to public subsidy funding, trial external validation of assessment and create a more transparent VET sector. • Increased support for workers and learners with language literacy or numeracy needs is being achieved through additional funding for the Workplace English Language and Literacy program and the Language Literacy and Numeracy program. • COAG has also agreed to publicly subsidise training places to a minimum of the first Certificate III and for foundation skills and lower level qualifications contained within the Certificate III qualification. SCOTESE Industry Forum – industry priorities for VET reform In November 2011, Skills Australia hosted the third SCOTESE Industry Forum. Senator the Hon Chris Evans, requested that the Forum focus on industry’s priorities for the upcoming National Skills and Workforce Development Agreement between the States, Territories and the Commonwealth. The Forum provided an opportunity for Industry to meet with Commonwealth, State and Territory Ministers responsible for tertiary education and provide input on issues of importance to industry in the Agreement. The National Agreement on Skills and Workforce Development aims to ensure that all working age Australians have the opportunity to develop the skills and 22 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  26. 26. qualifications that will enable them to participate in and contribute to the modern labour market. Forum participants focused their discussion around the four themes of VET reform: 1. Quality – ensuring industry and individuals have confidence in the system’s outcomes; 2. Transparency – ensuring industry and individuals can make informed choices; 3. Efficiency – ensuring industry and individuals have access to a system that is aligned to their skill needs; and 4. Equity – ensuring the system encourages participation by all. Research projects Quality Outcomes In Skills for Prosperity, Skills Australia proposed substantive reforms to improve the quality of outcomes being achieved by the Australian VET system. One of the recommendations was the introduction of demand-based funding for the VET sector, framed around an entitlement for individuals to receive fully publicly subsidised training up to Certificate III for vocational courses and all foundation courses. In addition, Skills Australia proposed that governments strengthen quality requirements by establishing criteria for RTOs to qualify as providers of publicly funded entitlement places. In the second half of 2011, Skills Australia commissioned research to identify the quality criteria to be met by RTOs providing training under a student entitlement model. The purpose of this report was to: • research and analyse the development of such eligibility criteria and their interaction with existing arrangements at state and territory level and the national level; and • provide advice that could contribute to stakeholder discussion about possible future directions in this area. The final report titled, Eligibility criteria for RTOs to provide publicly funding training, was sent to all jurisdictions and the VET regulatory bodies. Monitoring skills shortages and surpluses in the market for skills Skills Australia commissioned the National Institute of Labour Studies (NILS) to identify indicators of under and over supply of qualifications and to develop methodologies and tools to assess skill needs. This research will provide a tool to enable the monitoring of supply and demand of qualifications in the context of demand led systems in both higher education and vocational education and training, with a focus on specialised occupations. The report is expected to be completed in the second half of 2012. Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 23
  27. 27. Related achievements during 2011-12 Engineering Seminar In December 2011, Skills Australia hosted an Engineering Pathways Seminar to initiate a national dialogue between key stakeholders and discuss ways to address skills shortages in the engineering occupations. The seminar focused on the role of engineering VET Diplomas and Advanced Diplomas, both in their own right and as potential pathways to higher education. The purpose of this seminar was to: • provide a forum to discuss issues of concern to the engineering industry identified by recent research, including skills shortages; • identify opportunities for stakeholders to work together to address these issues; and • suggest ways to improve the supply of engineering skills for the Australian workforce. At the end of the round table discussions the seminar participants agreed the following strategies might constitute ways forward: • Make engineering a stronger value proposition; • Clarify exactly what level of maths is needed for engineering occupations; • Use Certificate III/IV as fertile ground for growing the engineering technicians and professionals of the future; • Ensure the quality and relevance of higher level VET qualifications; • Employers to make better use of the skills of their engineering workforce. It was agreed that the importance of employment / labour market structures was an overarching consideration that should be taken into account. Board representation • Chair Philip Bullock was invited to be a member of the Tertiary Education, Quality and Pathways Principal Committee of SCOTESE. Philip has attended all meetings held during 2011-12. 24 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  28. 28. Strategic Priority 4: Plan for the transition to the new National Workforce and Productivity Agency. Key highlights: • Establishment of the interim Board of the Agency from 1 October 2011. • Provided advice on allocation of $50 million of National Workforce Development Funds. • Prepared for the transition to the Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency. In May 2011 the Australian Government announced its intention to establish the Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency (AWPA) to commence from 1 July 2012. In September 2011, Minister Evans appointed an interim Board to commence from 1 October 2011, nine months ahead of its scheduled start date. The aim of the new Agency is to improve long- term workforce planning and development to address skills and labour shortages and contribute to improvements in industry and workforce productivity. The Agency is also expected to develop a stronger research, analysis and advisory role, enabling it to specifically address improvements in Australian workforce productivity. The Interim Board was tasked with advising the Government on areas of critical industry need to support the National Workforce Development Fund (the Fund). During the period October 2011- June 2012 the Interim Board started its strategic work by developing principles and a methodology to underpin its advice on priority areas for the allocation of National Workforce Development Funds. It also focused on the administrative and operational arrangements for the establishment of the new Agency. Strategic focus In September 2011, Minister Evans announced that $50 million in funding would be made available through the National Workforce Development Fund during 2011-12. The funding was to be directed to priority areas identified by the interim Board of the Agency. The interim Board of the Agency agreed on a set of principles to underpin its recommendations on the allocation of National Workforce Development Funds: 1. Use of evidence-based analysis; 2. Incorporation of industry and other stakeholder advice on priorities and effective targeting of funds; 3. Consideration of whole of government priorities and strategies; 4. Avoiding duplication or substitution of other government or industry research and skill funding programs; and 5. Use of program data and performance reporting to assess program effectiveness and make necessary adjustments in current funding rounds. The Interim Board also agreed on the methodology by which to determine the sectoral priorities for allocation of the Fund. The methodology utilised a range of employment and industry sector data to develop a priority ranking. The rationale for this approach was to utilise objective data and take into account a number of factors that could be considered as drivers of industry need, and to look at their combined effect. Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 25
  29. 29. The priority areas for workforce development in 2011-12 as recommended by the Interim Board: • Priority 1 – $15 million to support the resources sector as well as those sectors where the effects of the resources boom are particularly acute. • Priority 2 – $15 million to address structural adjustment and reform challenges, particularly in the manufacturing and tourism sectors. • Priority 3 – $20 million to support up-skilling and skills deepening across all sectors of the economy. Other planning which the Interim Board undertook in order to prepare for the transition to the new Agency included: • commissioning the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) to develop an evaluation strategy for the new Fund; and • developing a research agenda which will focus on the quality of work and the contribution of human capital to productivity. Operational focus Actions undertaken during the 2011-12 to establish the Agency included: • updating the Guidelines for the Fund; • developing a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE) and the new Agency, outlining governance arrangements for the Fund and responsibilities of the Board balanced against the responsibilities of DIISRTE; and • providing specifications and data required for the IT system being developed to support the Fund. 26 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  30. 30. Strategic Priority 5: Engage with Skills Australia key stakeholders regularly and widely distribute outcomes of Skills Australia work to all stakeholders. Key highlights: • Held one major national conference in partnership with Industry Skills Councils • Hosted two SCOTESE Industry Forums and one Strategic Industry Forum • Held approximately 250 stakeholder meetings • Delivered presentations at 110 conferences • Upgraded the Skills Australia website • Published 17 reports, background papers and communiqués • Provided 11 written submissions in response to various inquiries and reviews Skills Australia Stakeholders Skills Australia aims to provide advice on the full range of skills and workforce development needs of the Australian economy. To achieve success in this aim, Skills Australia relies on fostering cooperative working relationships with a broad range of people and organisations that share an interest in workforce development needs, including but not limited to: • the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations; • industry as represented by Industry Skills Councils, professional associations, peak bodies, business representatives, employers and unions; • State and Territory Ministers responsible for education, training, employment and the relevant training authorities and through them the industry advisory bodies within each jurisdiction; • Other Commonwealth Ministers responsible for immigration, defence, resources and tourism; • individuals and employers accessing education and training; • peak bodies representing providers of education and training and universities; • Tertiary Education providers; • Commonwealth government agencies; • research organisations; • advisory bodies; and • intermediaries such as job services providers, career advisory services and group training associations. Engagement strategies Skills Australia’s relationship with industry is primarily through the peak industry bodies, the Industry Skills Councils, professional associations, peak training bodies and peak bodies representing the university sector. During 2011-12 Skills Australia held monthly meetings and regular briefings with these bodies and worked collaboratively to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes. Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 27
  31. 31. In addition, the Chair, Board and Senior Executive met with approximately 250 stakeholders and provided briefings and presentations at 110 conferences, forums, workshops and seminars. Skills Australia’s major public engagement was through the national conference Putting skills at the heart of the economy held in collaboration with Industry Skills Councils in Melbourne in July 2012. This conference attracted 450 delegates and involved a business breakfast, five key note speakers, a debate on migration, a ‘Q and A’ panel discussion and seven breakout sessions with industry representatives and employers. Skills Australia’s other major public engagement was through nationwide consultations with industry, education providers, governments and community groups on a number of its major policy projects as well as through seeking submissions to its policy work. Throughout the year Skills Australia received a total of 172 submissions in response to discussion papers and calls for submissions. This input from stakeholders has contributed important insights and stakeholder engagement in the Board’s advice to government. Skills Australia’s formal engagement with Ministers and key industry stakeholders was through SCOTESE (Standing Council on Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment) Industry forum (two were held during 2011-2012) and its annual Strategic Industry Forum. Adopting social media technology A range of social media channels were introduced in 2011 as a mechanism to increase reach and provide transparency through two way communication. The following social media were utilised by Skills Australia: • Twitter was implemented in 2011 to increase two way communications with a range of stakeholders, in particular industry members. Skills Australia’s twitter handle was @SkillsAus and was followed by over 400 stakeholders. • Skills Australia establislhed its own YouTube channel, which enabled it to distribute videos via social media and email. Eleven videos were produced by Skills Australia in 2011, which were viewed 1,275 times. • Skills Australia hosted two webinars in 2011 which enabled it to seek feedback from a large group of stakeholders on its scenario work and its skills utilisation work. • During World Skills London, Skills Australia’s CEO, Robin Shreeve, blogged about the importance of training and apprenticeships and his experience of the event. The blog was followed widely, in particular by the Industry Skills Councils. 28 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  32. 32. International Liaisons Skills Australia continued to build relations with international stakeholders. During 2011-12 Skills Australia’s CEO participated in World Skills in London and gave a presentation to the International Network of Sector Skills Organisations (INSSO). In addition, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) invited the CEO to contribute a chapter to a Springer TVET Book Series, titled Skills for Inclusive and Sustainable Growth in Developing Asia-Pacific. The chapter is titled From TVET to Workforce Development and provides a critical analysis of the policy directions being taken in Australia to meet challenges related to skills and workforce development. Since then, the ADB has invited the CEO to participate and speak at a forum that it is convening on international skills in December 2012. Dr Caroline Smith gave a paper, Workforce Development in Australia: Skills Australia’s approach to meeting future skill needs, at an OECD/Korean Employment Information Service meeting in Korea in December 2011. The Chair of Skills Australia, Philip Bullock, was appointed Chairman of the Skills Agenda Working Group of the Australia-India Education Council (AIEC). In August 2011, Mr Bullock accompanied Minister Evans and his delegation to India for the inaugural AIEC meeting, which was co-chaired by Minister Evans and his Indian counterpart, Shri Kapil Sibal, Minister for Human Development. In addition the Secretariat gave presentations to visiting delegations as follows: • Chinese VET officials (November 2011) • African TVET delegation (November 2011) • Canadian government officials (November 2011) • Hong Kong and China delegation (March 2012) • Maldives senior government officials (April 2012) • Vietnamese senior government officials (May 2012) • Malaysian delegation study tour (June 2012) • Botswana senior government officials (June 2012) Dissemination Website The aim of the Skills Australia website is to provide transparency regarding its advice to government and to facilitate the sharing of information with those interested in the current, emerging and future workforce skills needs and workforce development needs. During the year the Skills Australia website was restructured to better reflect its main areas of work. Between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012, the number of visitors to the site increased from 64,589 visits to 114,532. Of those, approximately 83,194 were new visits to the website. Media Skills Australia’s media engagement aimed to further raise the profile and engage stakeholders in dialogue on its core body of work. Along with standard media releases the Board and Senior Executive conducted media interviews and wrote articles for newspapers, industry journals, and research forums including: • Infoworks – Issue 1 2012 – The challenge of prosperity Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 29
  33. 33. • The Australian Financial Review – Australia ignoring hidden resource (April 2012) • Campus Review – VET needs external assessors (April 2012) • Campus Review – Stopping the student drift from VET (April 2012) • Campus Review – Tailor-made scenarios to update training targets (October 2011) • HRMonthly – Better Use of Skills (February 2012) • The Australian – Better Use of Skills (June 2012) Skills Australia Reports During the period 2011-12 Skills Australia’s major publications were: • 2011 Interim Report on Resources Sector Skills Needs (July 2011) • Major Projects Schedule and Construction Workforce Estimates (September 2011) • Skills Australia Annual Report 2010-2011 (September 2011) • Employment Growth Projections in Mining Operations (October 2011) • Defence Industry Workforce Strategy – Discussion Paper (February 2012) • Defence Industry Workforce Strategy – Background Paper (February 2012) • Better use of skills, better outcomes: Australian case studies (April 2012) • Better use of skills, better outcomes: A research report on skills utilisation in Australia (May 2012) Other Skills Australia publications Skills Australia has also produced a range of material to support its major advice and to keep stakeholders informed of its major work activities. These include: • 4th Annual Strategic Industry Forum Communiqué: Planning for Workforce Development – (July 2011) • Background Paper on Directions for Workforce Development Planning (July 2011) • Better Workforce Planning: Reflections on recent experiences in Norway, Singapore, the UK and the USA (July 2011) • Conference communiqué: Conference shines a light on critical skills and workforce issues for Australia (July 2011) • Crisis and Change in Ireland: The Role of Skills and Innovation (July 2011) • 3rd SCOTESE Industry Forum Background papers and Communiqué: Industry priorities for input to negotiations on the forthcoming National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development – (November 2011) • Engineering Pathways Seminar: background paper and summary of outcomes (December 2011) 30 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  34. 34. • Summary sheets for occupations on SOL and information to explain why specialised occupations have not been included on the SOL (June 2012) • 4th SCOTESE Industry Forum Background paper and Communiqué: Meeting skills needs in regional Australia All publications are available on the Skills Australia website at www.awpa.gov.au/ publications/publications.html. 2011-12 Submissions Skills Australia wrote 11 written submissions in response to various inquiries and reviews. • DIAC’s Simpler Visa – implementation of a simpler framework for temporary residence work visas (August 2011) • Victorian Parliament’s Education and Training Committee’s Inquiry into Agricultural Education in Victoria (September 2011) • House of Representatives Standing Committee on Regional Australia – Inquiry into the experience of fly-in, fly-out (FIFO) and drive-in, drive-out (DIDO) workers in regional Australia (October 2011) • Productivity Commission study on the impact of COAG reforms for VET and transitions from School (October 2011) • National Skills Standards Councils (NSSC) paper on nominal hours in Training Packages (December 2011) • Parliament of Victoria’s Inquiry into Growing the Suburbs: Infrastructure and Business Development in Outer Suburban Melbourne (December 2011) • Senate Inquiry: Higher Education and Skills Training to Support Future Demand in Agriculture and Agribusiness in Australia (January 2012) • Productivity Commission COAG reform discussion draft Impacts of COAG Reforms: Business Regulation and VET (February 2012) • Senate Inquiry into the Shortage of Engineering and Related Employment Skills (March 2012) • Senate Inquiry into the National Vocational Education and Training Regulator (Charges) Bill 2012 (April 2012) • International Education Advisory Council discussion paper for the Development of an International Education Strategy for Australia (June 2012) Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 31
  35. 35. economy by training and retraining workers for new jobs in growing industries and higher skilled roles. Further the Minister announced that the government would bring forward the work of the National Workforce and Productivity Agency to advise on how best to meet the continuing demands for skilled workers and support industries and workers affected by structural adjustment. The existing Skills Australia Board was expanded by three new members to form an interim Board of the Agency. The interim Board began on 1 October 2011, nine months ahead of the scheduled start date of 1 July 2012. The interim Board was tasked with focussing its effort on funding training for the Australian workforce to meet the skills demand of booming industries and providing practical, targeted training to those workers directly affected by restructuring. Section 27(2) of the Skills Australia Act 2008 states that Skills Australia must include in its annual report details of any directions given to it by the Minister under paragraph 6(4) (b) or subsection 7(1) during the year. The Minister for Defence Material, the Hon. Jason Clare MP announced in September 2011 that Skills Australia would work with the Defence industry to develop a plan to ensure Australian industry has the skills to deliver Defence procurement over the next decade. The Defence Workforce Strategy Discussion Paper was released in February 2012 and the final report will be released in September 2012. On 21 September 2011, Minister Evans announced that a new workforce agency would target pressure points in Australia’s patchwork Ministerial Directions Future Directions Major projects being progressed include: • developing of the next National Workforce Development Strategy; • establishing and progressing the strategic priorities of the Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency; • preparing for the 2012 annual conference on the Future of Work – Developing Australia’s Workforce in a Global Economy; • updating the Resource Sector Skill Needs annual report; • conducting consultations and analysis for the next Specialised Occupations List (SpOL) and the Skilled Occupations List (SOL); and • developing the business plan for the new Agency. 32 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  36. 36. The Skills Australia Board currently meets on a monthly basis. The location of Board meetings is rotated throughout the year to enable Board members to meet with key stakeholders in a range of capital cities. Under the Act, a Board Member may be terminated if they are absent without leave from three consecutive Board meetings. For the financial year 2011-2012 all Board members have complied 1 Mr Paul O’Sullivan; Mr David Epstein; Mr Chris Robinson; Mr Martin Riordan; Ms Dianne Murray; Ms Virginia Simmons; Mr David Hind; Ms Yvonne von Hartel; Mr Adrian Smith; Mr Rod Cooke; Mr Robin Flynn; Ms Jenny Ferber; Mr Steve Vamos; Ms Anna Booth. Skills Australia Board with this requirement. During 2011-2012 face to face Board meetings were held in Departmental or Skills Australia offices. Meetings were held in Canberra (3) Melbourne (3) Sydney (5) and Brisbane (1). There were also numerous teleconference meetings. Approximately 14 guests attended Board meetings from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012 and the Board also held discussions with a number of senior officials of DIISRTE.1 In the second half of 2011, Paul Howes, Secretary of the Australian Workers Union, Peter Anderson, Head of the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry and Dr John Edwards, Board member of RBA, were appointed to the interim Board of the Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency. Date City Heather Ridout Michael Keating Ged Kearney Keith Spence Marie Persson Gerald Bourke Philip Bullock Peter Anderson Paul Howes John Edwards 15.07.2011 Melbourne P P P V P P P 19.08.2011 Sydney L P P P P P P 16.09.2011 Sydney P P L P P P P 14.10.2011 Melbourne L L T V T P P P T V 9.11.2011 Canberra T L T L P P P P T P 25.11.2011 Brisbane L P P P P P P P L P 16.12.2011 Sydney P P L T P L P V T P 17.02.2012 Canberra T P T V P P P T T P 16.03.2012 Sydney P P P P P P P L L P 13.04.2012 Melbourne V P L P P P P P V P 18.05.2012 Canberra L P L P P P P P L P 15.06.2012 Sydney L P L P P P P P L T P  – Present   T  – Teleconference   V  – Videoconference   L  – Leave of Absence Board Meetings Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 33
  37. 37. Management and Accountability The Skills Australia Board consists of ten members, including the Chair. The members are appointed by the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Science and Research by a written instrument for a term not exceeding three years. Members are paid remuneration that is determined by the Remuneration Tribunal. Remuneration Tribunal Determination 2011/09 dated 1 July 2011 specified part-time daily rates of $1,058 for the Chair and $873 for members, along with Tier 1 travel. Staff within the Skills Australia Secretariat are engaged under the Public Service Act 1999, and made available by the Secretary of the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education. Funds to cover the operational aspects of Skills Australia, including the conduct of meetings and related travel and accommodation of members are appropriated annually through Appropriation Bill (No.1). Skills Australia’s appropriation for the 2011-12 financial year was $5 million. Expenditure of the appropriation is reported under the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education’s Annual Report, under the outcomes relating to Tertiary, Youth and International. Sections 14 and 15 of the Skills Australia Act 2008, set out the requirements in case of a conflict of interest for members of the Board of Skills Australia. Each Member of Skills Australia has disclosed to the Minister all his/her interests, as per Section 14 of the Act. To assist in managing potential conflict of interest, at the beginning of each Board meeting, the Chair invites members to advise of any potential conflict of interest. There have been no instances of conflict of interest raised to date. 34 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  38. 38. Skills Australia transitioned to the Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency (AWPA) on 1 July 2012. Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency Secretariat Sue Beitz Head of Secretariat Phone: (02) 6121 9278 Postal address Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency Secretariat GPO Box 9839, Canberra, ACT 2601 Email: contactus@awpa.gov.au Website: www.awpa.gov.au Contacting Skills Australia Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 35
  39. 39. Notes 36 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  40. 40. Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12 37
  41. 41. 38 Skills Australia Annual Report 2011–12
  42. 42. www.awpa.gov.au

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