Child Abuse  Chrystal M. Dubay  Argosy University Online PSY492 April 19, 2010 Mary Viventi
The Issue of Children being abused within the home has become significantly high as decades pass.  <ul><li>Preventing chil...
Battered Child Syndrome <ul><li>Battered child syndrome refers to injuries sustained by a child as a result of physical ab...
Arguments  <ul><li>Many parents may argue that disciplining their child isn’t always considering child abuse.  </li></ul><...
Symptoms of Abuse  <ul><li>Parents need to understand the symptoms of abuse and determine the difference of child abuse be...
How Child Abuse is Handle  <ul><li>In order to prevent child abuse there has to be a case and evidence that foresees that ...
Falsely Accused <ul><li>Falsely reports can vary from the child just acting out because they are seeking attention and are...
Spanking What Does The Law say?  <ul><li>There is a still a fine line between what constitutes discipline and abuse. </li>...
Final Analysis <ul><li>It is prudent that parents and caregivers understand symptoms and how process of preventing child a...
Reference: <ul><li>Lantos, John D. (2004). Abuse, Interpersonal: I. Child Abuse. In Stephen Post (Ed.),  Encyclopedia of B...
Continue.. <ul><li>Child Abuse. (2001). In Bonnie Strickland (Ed.),  Gale Encyclopedia of Psychology , (2nd ed., 112-115)....
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  • This could vary from an adult getting anger and hitting them for no apparent reason, to aggressively discipline them by leaving marks and bruises in places that are not seen. Emotional damage to a child is also often the by-product of child abuse, which can result in serious behavioral problems such as substance abuse or physical abuse to others (Tenerelli, 2002). Children can start having behavioral problems at school and with others and as they grow older teens may get into substances such as alcohol and other drugs.
  • Cultural or religious differences may also play a role in evaluating what constitutes medical neglect (Lantos, 2004). Christian Scientists, for example, may claim that it is appropriate not to take their sick children to a doctor, while courts may determine that such behavior constitutes neglect (Lantos, 1994).
  • An estimate 3, 154, 00 children were reported to child protective services agencies as alleged victims of child abuse or neglect in 1998, with about 1 million of the reports confirmed (Child Abuse. 2001). Physical abuse can be determined with recurring and unexplained injuries such as broken bone or burns. Other signs such as, improbable excuses or refusal to explain injuries, wearing clothing to cover injuries, even in hot weather, refusal to undress for gym, bald patches, chronic running away, fear of medical help or examination, self-destructive tendencies, aggression towards others, fear of physical contact-shrinking back if touched, admitting that they are punished, but punished is excessive (such as a child being beaten ever night to “make him/her study”) and fear of suspected abuser being contacted (Child Abuse. 2001).
  • In less server cases of child abuse, for example, when a parent leaves a child in a car while making a quick stop in a grocery store, intervention may be nothing more than requiring the parent to meet with a social worker to learn about the dangers of leaving a child unattended (Child Abuse/Child Safety/Discipline., 2006). Victims of Child Abuse Laws (VOCAL), seeks a reform in a child abuse laws to better protect the rights of parents, who may be falsely accused of child abuse or neglect (Child Abuse/Child Safety/Discipline.,2006).
  • False reports of child abuse also may result from animosity between parents, such as when parents are in the midst of divorce and custody battles over their children (Child Abuse/Child Safety/Discipline. 2006). 
  • For example, some parents feel that spanking or hitting a child is abusive behavior; other parents rely on spanking or the threat of a spanking, to teach children to obey and behave (Child Abuse/Child Safety/Discipline. 2006). In trying to prevent child abuse, legal and governmental agencies attempt to balance the parent’s right to raise their children in the manner they feel is appropriate with the child’s right to be safe and unharmed (Child Abuse/Child Safety/Discipline. (2006). 
  • Week 8 Slideshow

    1. 1. Child Abuse Chrystal M. Dubay Argosy University Online PSY492 April 19, 2010 Mary Viventi
    2. 2. The Issue of Children being abused within the home has become significantly high as decades pass. <ul><li>Preventing child abuse in the home is important in every aspect because many children who are being abused can be harmed or even can cause death to a child. </li></ul><ul><li>Parents should show their support for prevention of child abuse programs, even if they feel that some programs violate their privacy. </li></ul><ul><li>Reasoning behind this is for parents to be able to show their child the signs of abuse and know how to report it. </li></ul><ul><li>There is a fine line between the two differences of just discipline and child abuse and it should be made clear with the children and the parents. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Battered Child Syndrome <ul><li>Battered child syndrome refers to injuries sustained by a child as a result of physical abuse, usually inflicted by an adult caregiver. </li></ul><ul><li>Leaving marks and bruises in places that are not seen. </li></ul><ul><li>Emotionally withdrawn from others such as not having many friends or plays by themselves. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Arguments <ul><li>Many parents may argue that disciplining their child isn’t always considering child abuse. </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural or religious difference may play a role. </li></ul><ul><li>Neglect can range from emotional to physical. </li></ul><ul><li>There maybe other factors involved such as discipline issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Looking at what the symptoms of serve child abuse is important and understanding how parents can prevent them is also critical important. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Symptoms of Abuse <ul><li>Parents need to understand the symptoms of abuse and determine the difference of child abuse before reporting others for child abuse. </li></ul><ul><li>About 3,154,00 children were reported in 1998 and about 1 million were confirmed. </li></ul><ul><li>Having more people aware helps prevent deaths within the home and further abuse to the children. </li></ul><ul><li>Some symptoms may be physical such as unexplained recurring broken bones or burns. </li></ul><ul><li>The refusal to explain those broken bones or injuries. </li></ul><ul><li>Wearing clothing to cover up (even in hot weather). </li></ul><ul><li>Doesn’t want to undress for GYM. </li></ul><ul><li>Bald patches. </li></ul><ul><li>Runny away all the time. </li></ul><ul><li>Having the fear of medical help or examination. </li></ul><ul><li>Actually coming out and saying that they are abused at the age that they can. </li></ul><ul><li>Shriking back if touched. </li></ul>
    6. 6. How Child Abuse is Handle <ul><li>In order to prevent child abuse there has to be a case and evidence that foresees that there is an issue with child abuse within the home. </li></ul><ul><li>This is where the law enforcement comes in and does an investigation to determine if there is evidence against the guardians of child abuse. </li></ul><ul><li>Then it will go to the child protective services to determine whether or not it is a case of child abuse and the child gets placed in a safer environment. </li></ul><ul><li>Some cases may be lesser punished. </li></ul><ul><li>Unfriendly there are cases that law enforcement makes mistakes. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Falsely Accused <ul><li>Falsely reports can vary from the child just acting out because they are seeking attention and are resisting authority. </li></ul><ul><li>Many cases can sometimes be mislead and so it is crucial that investigators don’t make the wrong perceptions and that is where VOCAL comes in to help those parents who have been falsely accused. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Spanking What Does The Law say? <ul><li>There is a still a fine line between what constitutes discipline and abuse. </li></ul><ul><li>Some parents feel that spanking is wrong, while others think that is necessary to discipline a child. </li></ul><ul><li>The law begs a differ and they believe that it is the parent’s right to raise their child as the feel as long as the child is safe and unharmed. </li></ul><ul><li>Parents can conclude their own hypothesis on where the line should be drawn, but it ultimately up to the courts and investigators to determine child abuse. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Final Analysis <ul><li>It is prudent that parents and caregivers understand symptoms and how process of preventing child abuse is concurrent to one another and what to report and what not to report. </li></ul><ul><li>In the end it is up to the investigators and law to take action towards cases that are reported. </li></ul><ul><li>Being aware and having the information is the best way to prevent child abuse and so that services can look into get the child into a safer environment. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Reference: <ul><li>Lantos, John D. (2004). Abuse, Interpersonal: I. Child Abuse. In Stephen Post (Ed.),  Encyclopedia of Bioethics , Vol. 1. (3rd ed., 43-47). New York: Macmillan Reference USA. Retrieved March 27, 2010, from Gale Virtual Reference Library via Gale:  <http://find.galegroup.com/gvrl/infomark.do?&contentSet=EBKS&type=retrieve&tabID=T001&prodId=GVRL&docId=CX3402500022&source=gale&userGroupName=lirn_main&version=1.0> </li></ul><ul><li>  Tenerelli, Mary Jane. (2002). Battered Child Syndrome. In Jacqueline L. Longe (Ed.),  Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine , Vol. 1. (2nd ed., 452-453). Detroit: Gale. Retrieved March 27, 2010, from Gale Virtual Reference Library via Gale:  http://find.galegroup.com/gvrl/infomark.do?&contentSet=EBKS&type=retrieve&tabID=T001&prodId=GVRL&docId=CX3405600214&source=gale&userGroupName=lirn_main&version=1.0 </li></ul>
    11. 11. Continue.. <ul><li>Child Abuse. (2001). In Bonnie Strickland (Ed.),  Gale Encyclopedia of Psychology , (2nd ed., 112-115). Detroit: Gale. Retrieved March 27, 2010, from Gale Virtual Reference Library via Gale:  http://find.galegroup.com/gvrl/infomark.do?&contentSet=EBKS&type=retrieve&tabID=T001&prodId=GVRL&docId=CX3406000118&source=gale&userGroupName=lirn_main&version=1.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Child Abuse/Child Safety/Discipline. (2006). In Jeffrey Wilson (Ed.),  Gale Encyclopedia of Everyday Law , Vol. 1. (2nd ed., 741-744). Detroit: Gale. Retrieved March 27, 2010, from Gale Virtual Reference Library via Gale:  <http://find.galegroup.com/gvrl/infomark.do?&contentSet=EBKS&type=retrieve&tabID=T001&prodId=GVRL&docId=CX2588700141&source=gale&userGroupName=lirn_main&version=1.0> </li></ul>

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