Intercultural communication

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Intercultural communication

  1. 1. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION Dr. Carol Reade Department of Organization and Management College of Business San Jose State University
  2. 2. DESCRIPTION <ul><li>This session examines the role of culture and perception when communicating across cultures. We cover key concepts of culture as well as verbal communication styles and nonverbal communication behaviors. The session is highly interactive using experiential exercises and video discussion. </li></ul>
  3. 3. HOFSTEDE’S CULTURAL DIMENSIONS <ul><li>Individualism vs. Collectivism - Individualism is the tendency of people to look after themselves and their immediate family only. Collectivism is the tendency of people to belong to groups or collectives and to look after each other in exchange for loyalty. </li></ul><ul><li>Power Distance - The extent to which less powerful members of institutions and organizations accept that power is distributed unequally. </li></ul><ul><li>Uncertainty Avoidance - The extent to which people feel threatened by ambiguous situations and have created beliefs and institutions that try to avoid these. </li></ul><ul><li>Masculinity vs. Femininity - A culture in which the dominant values in society are success, money, and things scores high on masculinity. A culture in which the dominant values in society are caring for others and quality of life scores high on femininity. </li></ul>
  4. 4. VERBAL COMMUNICATION STYLES <ul><li>Indirect and Direct Styles – </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In high-context cultures, messages are implicit and indirect. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In low-context cultures, messages are direct </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Elaborate, Exacting and Succinct Styles – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Elaborate – </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Great deal of talking, much description </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Exacting – </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Moderate amount of talking </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Succinct – </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Few words, understatement </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contextual and Personal Style – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Contextual – </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>focus on the relationship of the parties; speaker’s place in relationship. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Personal – </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>focus on the speaker and the reduction of barriers between the parties. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Affective and Instrumental Styles – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Affective – </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Process oriented, and focused on the receiver </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Instrumental – </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Goal-oriented, and focused on the sender. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>

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