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Unit 7: Basic Copywriting <ul><li>Copies help tell the story and re-kindle memories. </li></ul><ul><li>Copy balances layou...
Style 1: The News Story Inverted Pyramid Most Important Facts Supporting Facts Least Important Facts Facts in a news story...
Good Lead Practically flying over Hilo High defense at mid-field, Nathan Lee made the final goal and led the Cardinals to ...
Writing Leads… <ul><li>Choose between news or feature writing </li></ul><ul><li>Ask yourself what is important or unique a...
Types of Leads <ul><li>Narrative:  A form of a dialogue or story. </li></ul>After the first week it stopped being a matter...
<ul><li>Descriptive: Using detail to recreate a scene or event.  </li></ul>Green, go fast.  Yellow, go faster. Red, (darn)...
<ul><li>Summary: Puts the entire story in a nutshell.  </li></ul>Keeping the traditional bonfire burning past midnight on ...
Writing with action and color <ul><li>Active verbs, quotes and descriptive based on observation make a story flow. </li></...
General dos and don’ts <ul><li>Write to express, not impress. </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity is great, but be accurate. </li...
The Body <ul><li>Remaining paragraphs are called the body.  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quotes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facts ...
Style 2: The Feature Story <ul><li>Relies on facts and quotes to tell the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Primarily entertains an...
Type of Feature Stories <ul><li>Personality sketch: Captures a person’s unique actions or accomplishments through descript...
Captions <ul><li>Three parts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lead In (optional) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Present tense of immediat...
Watch out…she’s determined!  Freshman Keiko Bostwick  represents  her group in a debate on why you should not have sex dur...
Headlines <ul><li>A headline needs to draw the reader’s attention. </li></ul><ul><li>A headline is not a label, but a lure...
Headline writing rules <ul><li>Write in present tense. </li></ul>Having to sneak on campus with rollers and leotards on ke...
Headline writing rules <ul><li>Eliminate articles:  a, an and the </li></ul>The approved skip day is a treat for the senio...
Headline writing rules <ul><li>Don’t split verbs at the end of a line. </li></ul>Violin soloist goes for first place prize...
Headline writing rules <ul><li>Don’t end a line with a preposition. </li></ul>Exhibit features art by students and faculty...
Headline writing rules <ul><li>Don’t split names at the end of a line. </li></ul>George Smith, Jan Jones win debate finals...
Headline writing rules <ul><li>Choose sparkling verbs. </li></ul>FFA stock show, rodeo draws large audience Wrong FFA stoc...
Headline writing rules <ul><li>Don’t write labels for the spread. Each headline should include a noun, verb and direct obj...
Headline Punctuation <ul><li>Direct quotes = single quotation marks. </li></ul><ul><li>Single quotation marks = used to sa...
The comma replaces “and” in a series… New dress code sports shorts, sundresses, tanks When a headline offers a separate th...
Use a colon to set off a list. Fads demand: three earrings, two watches, one sense of humor An exclamation point is used o...
Proofreading and Editing <ul><li>Why? To many opportunities to misspell a name, misplace a comma or miscommunicate altoget...
Who should proofread <ul><li>Every writer should first carefully proofread his own story. </li></ul><ul><li>Beware of obje...
What to Know <ul><li>STYLE SHEET: establish a style sheet to specifying your staff rules concerning organization, punctuat...
Proofreader’s tools <ul><li>Dictionary </li></ul><ul><li>Thesaurus </li></ul><ul><li>Staff style sheet </li></ul><ul><li>G...
How to mark copy and proofs
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Unit 7 Basic Copywriting

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Unit 7 Basic Copywriting

  1. 1. Unit 7: Basic Copywriting <ul><li>Copies help tell the story and re-kindle memories. </li></ul><ul><li>Copy balances layout design. </li></ul><ul><li>GENERAL RULES: </li></ul><ul><li>Stories are written in past tense. </li></ul><ul><li>Captions and headlines are written in past tense. </li></ul><ul><li>All copies should relate to students and define each activity as if it’s the only time it might happen. </li></ul><ul><li>Capture unique facts, ideas and emotions. </li></ul><ul><li>Describe the HOW and WHY. </li></ul>
  2. 2. Style 1: The News Story Inverted Pyramid Most Important Facts Supporting Facts Least Important Facts Facts in a news story are listed in order of importance. This was developed so stories could be edited from the bottom without changing the meaning of the story. Write with the 5Ws and H Who What When Where Why How
  3. 3. Good Lead Practically flying over Hilo High defense at mid-field, Nathan Lee made the final goal and led the Cardinals to a 4-3 home victory January 13, 2005. Poor Lead On Saturday afternoon, January 13 at 2:00, people filled the bleachers at St. Joseph School to see what they hoped would be an exciting soccer game. <ul><li>Who </li></ul><ul><li>What </li></ul><ul><li>When </li></ul><ul><li>Where </li></ul><ul><li>Why </li></ul><ul><li>How </li></ul>Experiment by leading off with the most important aspect of the event. Leads
  4. 4. Writing Leads… <ul><li>Choose between news or feature writing </li></ul><ul><li>Ask yourself what is important or unique about the event. </li></ul><ul><li>Make it exciting so your readers would want to read. </li></ul><ul><li>Add humor, drama, seriousness, a narration. </li></ul><ul><li>Fit the mood of the story or event. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Types of Leads <ul><li>Narrative: A form of a dialogue or story. </li></ul>After the first week it stopped being a matter of dollars and cents and became a matter of pounds and ounces. The drill team’s M & M sale dragged on for weeks as some girls ate up the profits and watched the needed creep up at weigh-in.
  6. 6. <ul><li>Descriptive: Using detail to recreate a scene or event. </li></ul>Green, go fast. Yellow, go faster. Red, (darn) stop. It’s the corner of Ululani and Kinoole and there’s a game of traffic roulette going on. This bottleneck just outside the high school is a game of chance and you hardly ever get lucky. <ul><li>Quotation: Used sparingly, this lead showcases an outstanding direct quote which is strong enough to support the tone and theme of the story. </li></ul>“ It’s a simple matter of marketing, ladies and gentlemen,” the sales representative said. “You just have to create a need for Gummi worms and your fund-raising campaign is all set. It’s simple marketing.”
  7. 7. <ul><li>Summary: Puts the entire story in a nutshell. </li></ul>Keeping the traditional bonfire burning past midnight on the night before homecoming wasn’t too breezy this year. High winds knocked over the fire and it fizzled by 10:30 p.m. <ul><li>Teaser: Direct reader through a series of partial clues about the story. </li></ul>The room was filled with the usual before-class chatter and shuffling. And even though she sat in the middle of the activity, one girl was not part of any conversation. Having lived through countless wars and changes in government, Korean-born Su Kim found the language barrier she faced in her new home very frightening.
  8. 8. Writing with action and color <ul><li>Active verbs, quotes and descriptive based on observation make a story flow. </li></ul><ul><li>Yearbook copy should INFORM, REMIND and LIVE. </li></ul><ul><li>Worn-out phrases such as “student body,” “this year,” “hard work,” “determination,” “gave 100 percent,” “highlight of the year,” “under the direction of,” “lots of fun,” and “long hours” should be replaced by original phrases. </li></ul><ul><li>Edit out passive and boring verbs such as was, were, held, presented and variations of the verb “to be.” </li></ul>
  9. 9. General dos and don’ts <ul><li>Write to express, not impress. </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity is great, but be accurate. </li></ul><ul><li>Rewrite. Never accept your first draft as finished copy. </li></ul><ul><li>If you are having trouble with the lead, write the body first. </li></ul><ul><li>Watch transition. Your story should flow logically. </li></ul><ul><li>Use descriptive words. Paint a picture. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember your audience. </li></ul><ul><li>Generally speaking, write in third person and in past tense. </li></ul><ul><li>Spend time interviewing several people for your story. </li></ul>
  10. 10. The Body <ul><li>Remaining paragraphs are called the body. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quotes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facts </li></ul></ul>Example: In the soccer game, the body would report the effective and important plays that led to the team’s victory. It would also include comments from participants and reactions from spectators.
  11. 11. Style 2: The Feature Story <ul><li>Relies on facts and quotes to tell the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Primarily entertains and informs. </li></ul>Lead: tantalizes with an anecdote or teases with a hint of a story that is yet to unfold. Body and Conclusion: Explains what you bring to life in the lead. It brings the story back around in a circular motion by answering any questions and summarizing the ideas presented in the lead. NOTE: The inverted pyramid does not apply directly to the feature story. 5Ws and H are all answered early in the story, but editing cannot be done at the bottom.
  12. 12. Type of Feature Stories <ul><li>Personality sketch: Captures a person’s unique actions or accomplishments through description, quotes and information gathered from other sources. </li></ul><ul><li>Personal Experience: Written in first person and relates the action of an unusual experience, such as skydiving, canoeing or computer programming. </li></ul><ul><li>News Feature: Based in a timely news event from your school or community. It works well as a straight story. Possible topics might include a new construction or exceptional standardized testing scores. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Captions <ul><li>Three parts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lead In (optional) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Present tense of immediate action. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Past tense of action happening after that is not seen in picture. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use active verbs…NOT passive. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Must answer the 5Ws and H </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Watch out…she’s determined! Freshman Keiko Bostwick represents her group in a debate on why you should not have sex during the “Try Wait” presentation held on August 18, 2005. This tough “mama” easily defeated eighth grader Nick Gomes and his group.
  15. 15. Headlines <ul><li>A headline needs to draw the reader’s attention. </li></ul><ul><li>A headline is not a label, but a lure into the story. </li></ul><ul><li>A headline summarizes the story in a few, carefully-chosen words and makes the copy irresistible to the reader. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Headline writing rules <ul><li>Write in present tense. </li></ul>Having to sneak on campus with rollers and leotards on kept Hi-Steppers humble Wrong Sneaking on campus wearing rollers, leotards keeps Hi-Steppers humble Right
  17. 17. Headline writing rules <ul><li>Eliminate articles: a, an and the </li></ul>The approved skip day is a treat for the seniors Wrong Sanctioned skip day is senior treat Right
  18. 18. Headline writing rules <ul><li>Don’t split verbs at the end of a line. </li></ul>Violin soloist goes for first place prize Wrong Violinist wins top solo prize Right
  19. 19. Headline writing rules <ul><li>Don’t end a line with a preposition. </li></ul>Exhibit features art by students and faculty Wrong Exhibit features student, faculty art Right
  20. 20. Headline writing rules <ul><li>Don’t split names at the end of a line. </li></ul>George Smith, Jan Jones win debate finals Wrong Smith, Jones team takes debate finals Right
  21. 21. Headline writing rules <ul><li>Choose sparkling verbs. </li></ul>FFA stock show, rodeo draws large audience Wrong FFA stock show, rodeo wrangles-up a crowd Right
  22. 22. Headline writing rules <ul><li>Don’t write labels for the spread. Each headline should include a noun, verb and direct object. </li></ul>Swim Team Wrong Aqua-mania swamps team; Swimmers bring home medals Right
  23. 23. Headline Punctuation <ul><li>Direct quotes = single quotation marks. </li></ul><ul><li>Single quotation marks = used to save space. </li></ul><ul><li>Comma, semi-colon and colon = used regularly </li></ul>
  24. 24. The comma replaces “and” in a series… New dress code sports shorts, sundresses, tanks When a headline offers a separate thought, requiring a second sentence, use a semi-colon. Never use a period in a headline. Rush for prom frock; worry about date later
  25. 25. Use a colon to set off a list. Fads demand: three earrings, two watches, one sense of humor An exclamation point is used only when absolutely necessary. <ul><li>Know these rules and use them. </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain a sense of rhythm and an eye for good words. </li></ul><ul><li>Use appropriate puns sparingly. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Proofreading and Editing <ul><li>Why? To many opportunities to misspell a name, misplace a comma or miscommunicate altogether – especially when working under deadline pressure. </li></ul><ul><li>Careless copy could harm credibility of the yearbook and the staff. </li></ul><ul><li>People take their name’s misspelled personally </li></ul><ul><li>Doubts could arise about the accuracy of the whole story or book. </li></ul><ul><li>Proofreading polishes the rough edges of clumsy grammar. </li></ul>
  27. 27. Who should proofread <ul><li>Every writer should first carefully proofread his own story. </li></ul><ul><li>Beware of objectivity loss. </li></ul><ul><li>Hand your story over to another staff member for a second read-through. </li></ul><ul><li>Next send it to the section editor. </li></ul><ul><li>The second editor goes over all copy for his/her section and turns it in to the editor in chief (Ms. Sumida and/or editor), who will check it and submit it to the head proof reader (Sr. Marion and/or adviser). </li></ul>
  28. 28. What to Know <ul><li>STYLE SHEET: establish a style sheet to specifying your staff rules concerning organization, punctuation, abbreviations and titles. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mr., Mrs., Miss or Ms. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Capitalize homecoming or not? </li></ul></ul>
  29. 29. Proofreader’s tools <ul><li>Dictionary </li></ul><ul><li>Thesaurus </li></ul><ul><li>Staff style sheet </li></ul><ul><li>Grammar book </li></ul><ul><li>Student/faculty directory </li></ul><ul><li>Telephone book </li></ul><ul><li>Red pen </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of fear </li></ul>
  30. 30. How to mark copy and proofs

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