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sumandro_mapping the_city_27032012

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Presentation made at School of Architecture, RV College of Engineering, Bangalore. The talk focused on military, maritime and administrative embeddings of analog as well as digital mapping techniques; on neogeography, subjectivity and power in maps, and possibilities of counter mapping.

Presentation made at School of Architecture, RV College of Engineering, Bangalore. The talk focused on military, maritime and administrative embeddings of analog as well as digital mapping techniques; on neogeography, subjectivity and power in maps, and possibilities of counter mapping.

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sumandro_mapping the_city_27032012

  1. 1. Mapping the City Counter Mapping and Critical Geography Sumandro Chattapadhyay ajantriks.net
  2. 2. Kote, 1792
  3. 3. Kote, 1791
  4. 4. The World on Mercator’s Projection, W.G. Blackie, 1860
  5. 5. Serio-Comic War Map, Fred W. Rose, 1877
  6. 6. A Serio-Comic Map of Europe, John Bull and his Friends, 1900
  7. 7. Humorous Diplomatic Atlas of Europe and Asia, Kisaburo Ohara, 1904
  8. 8. The Prussian Octopus, 1915
  9. 9. Russia in 2008, Graeme Mackay, 2008
  10. 10. Rose Diagram, Florence Nightingale, 1858
  11. 11. Cholera Map by John Snow, 1854
  12. 12. Napoleon’s March by C.J. Minard, 1861
  13. 13. Internal Migration in USA by Jon Bruner, 2011
  14. 14. David McCandless, 2009
  15. 15. Africa Map by Kai Krause, 2010
  16. 16. The Economist, 2011
  17. 17. World Economy Cartogram, UNEP, 2000
  18. 18. Road Network, BBMP
  19. 19. Water Bodies, Greater Bangalore
  20. 20. Gorakhpur, Municipality GIS
  21. 21. Google Maps
  22. 22. Google Earth
  23. 23. London Bike Share Map, Oliver O’brien
  24. 24. Local Vs. Tourists, New York, Eric Fischer, 2010
  25. 25. Local Vs. Tourists, Tokyo, Eric Fischer, 2010
  26. 26. Live Singapore! by MIT SENSEable City Lab, 2011
  27. 27. openstreetmap.org
  28. 28. Humanitarian OSM
  29. 29. Humanitarian OSM
  30. 30. Ushahidi
  31. 31. MapKibera
  32. 32. Kibera on Google Maps
  33. 33. Guide Pychogéographique de Paris, Guy Debord, 1957
  34. 34. London Map, Stephen Walter
  35. 35. London Map, Stephen Walter
  36. 36. iSEE, Institute for Applied Autonomy
  37. 37. Greenwich Emotion Map, Christian Nold
  38. 38. Greenwich Emotion Map, Christian Nold
  39. 39. Cedar Grove Institute for Sustainable Communities
  40. 40. Opportunities: [1] Aggregation [2] Spatial ordering [3] Comparison [4] Pattern discovery
  41. 41. Opportunities: [1] Aggregation [2] Spatial ordering [3] Comparison [4] Pattern discovery
  42. 42. Opportunities: [1] Aggregation [2] Spatial ordering [3] Comparison [4] Pattern discovery
  43. 43. Opportunities: [1] Aggregation [2] Spatial ordering [3] Comparison [4] Pattern discovery
  44. 44. Reminders: [1] Map as worldview [2] Map as proposition [3] Mapping ≠ mapmaking [4] Royal and nomadic maps
  45. 45. Reminders: [1] Map as worldview [2] Map as proposition [3] Mapping ≠ mapmaking [4] Royal and nomadic maps
  46. 46. Reminders: [1] Map as worldview [2] Map as proposition [3] Mapping ≠ mapmaking [4] Royal and nomadic maps
  47. 47. Reminders: [1] Map as worldview [2] Map as proposition [3] Mapping ≠ mapmaking [4] Royal and nomadic maps
  48. 48. “ In the last few years cartography has been slipping from the control of the powerful elites that have exercised dominance over it for several hundred years. These elites — the great map houses of the west, the state, and to a lesser extent academics — have been challenged by two important developments. First, the actual business of mapmaking, of collecting spatial data and mapping it out, is passing out of the hands of the experts. The ability to make a map, even a stunning interactive 3D map, is now available to anyone with a home computer and an internet connection. ‘An introduction to Critical Cartography’ Jeremy Crampton & John Krygier
  49. 49. “ [Continued] Cartography’s latest “technological transition” is not so much a question of new mapping software but a mixture of “open source” collaborative tools, mobile mapping applications, and geotagging. While this trend has been apparent to industry insiders for some time, a more social theoretic critique, which we argue is a political one, situates maps within specific relations of power and not as neutral scientific documents. One might expect a critique of the politics of mapping to weaken the power of the map and to work against a transition [towards] putting maps into more people’s hands. But just the opposite has happened. If the map is a specific set of power-knowledge claims, then not only the state but others could make competing and equally powerful claims. ‘An introduction to Critical Cartography’ Jeremy Crampton & John Krygier
  50. 50. Courtesy: Al Jazeera, BBMP, Cedar Grove Institute for Sustainable Communities, Christian Nold, Eric Fischer, Foreign Policy, Global Security, Google Maps and Earth, India Urban Portal, Indian Institute of Science, InformationIsBeautiful.net, Institute for Applied Autonomy, Jon Bruner / Forbes, Kai Krause, MapKibera, miklianmaps.com, MIT SENSEable City Lab, Oliver O’Brien, OpenStreetMap.org, Stephen Walter, Strange Maps, The Economist, UC Santa Barbara, UNEP, Ushahidi, WikiMedia Commons. Sumandro Chattapadhyay ajantriks.net

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