EMERGING LEARNING
TRENDS
This short presentation gives an overview of some
terminologies we come across frequently (e-
lea...
WHAT DO LEADERS THINK?
Marc Ramos, global lead of Google Enterprise EDU Learning
Programs, says that the Internet service ...
E-LEARNING
 E-learning refers to the use of electronic media information and
communication technologies (ICT) in educatio...
E-LEARNING
 E-learning is a broadly inclusive term that describes
educational technology that electronically or
technolog...
GAMIFICATION
 Though the term "gamification" was coined in 2002 by Nick
Pelling,it did not gain popularity until 2010.Eve...
GAMIFICATION
 Gamification techniques strive to leverage people's natural
desires for competition, achievement, status, s...
SOCIAL LEARNING
 Social learning is learning that takes place at a wider scale
than individual or group learning, up to a...
MOBILE LEARNING (M-LEARNING)
 The term m-learning or "mobile learning", has
different meanings for different communities,...
MOBILE LEARNING
 M-learning technologies include handheld computers,
MP3 players, notebooks, mobile phones and tablets. M...
M-LEARNING
 M-learning is convenient in that it is accessible from
virtually anywhere. M-learning, like other forms of e-...
THANK YOU
Reference – LikedIN HR Group, Wikipaedia on E-Learning,
Social Learning, Mobile Learning, Gamification
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Emerging learning trends

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This short presentation gives an overview of some terminologies we come across frequently (e-learning, Social Learning, Gamification, Mobile Learning)

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Emerging learning trends

  1. 1. EMERGING LEARNING TRENDS This short presentation gives an overview of some terminologies we come across frequently (e- learning, Social Learning, Gamification, Mobile Learning) Ms Sukanya Patwardhan, India 28th August 2013 Sukanya.patwardhan@gmail.com
  2. 2. WHAT DO LEADERS THINK? Marc Ramos, global lead of Google Enterprise EDU Learning Programs, says that the Internet service company still has growing up and maturing to do when it comes to using its learning and training programs to increase efficiencies and standards. In a field defined by immediacy, speed is a critical aspect when designing new L&D programs at Google. When developing new ideas for learning platforms, Marc doesn't just focus on the latest trends, such as gamification and mobile learning. With native products like Android and Google Glass, Google has an obvious interest in further exploring those areas, but Marc notes that it's equally important to look at the traditional theories of adult learning and emerging learning markets, such as Africa and the Middle East, for new and innovative ideas about employee learning and development.
  3. 3. E-LEARNING  E-learning refers to the use of electronic media information and communication technologies (ICT) in education. E-learning is broadly inclusive of all forms of educational technology in learning and teaching.  E-learning includes numerous types of media that deliver text, audio, images, animation, and streaming video, and includes technology applications and processes such as audio or video tape, satellite TV, CD-ROM, and computer-based learning, as well as local intranet/extranet and web-based learning. Information and communication systems, whether free-standing or based on either local networks or the Internet in networked learning, underly many e- learning processes.  E-learning can occur in or out of the classroom. It can be self-paced, asynchronous learning or may be instructor-led, synchronous learning. E-learning is suited to distance learning and flexible learning, but it can also be used in conjunction with face-to-face teaching, in which case the term blended learning is commonly used.  It is commonly thought that new technologies make a big difference in education. Many proponents of e-learning believe that everyone must be equipped with basic knowledge of technology, as well as use it as a vehicle for reaching educational goals.
  4. 4. E-LEARNING  E-learning is a broadly inclusive term that describes educational technology that electronically or technologically supports learning and teaching. Bernard Luskin, a pioneer of e-learning, advocates that the "e" should be interpreted to mean "exciting, energetic, enthusiastic, emotional, extended, excellent, and educational" in addition to "electronic." This broad interpretation focuses on new applications and developments, and also brings learning and media psychology into consideration. Parks suggested that the "e" should refer to "everything, everyone, engaging, easy".
  5. 5. GAMIFICATION  Though the term "gamification" was coined in 2002 by Nick Pelling,it did not gain popularity until 2010.Even prior to the term coming into use, other fields borrowing elements from videogames was common; for example, some work in scientific visualization adapted elements from videogames. A Forbes blogger also retroactively labelled[49] Charles Coonradt, who in 1973 founded the consultancy The Game of Work and in 1984 wrote a book by the same name, as the "Grandfather of Gamification".  The term "gamification" first gained widespread usage in 2010, in a more specific sense referring to incorporation of social/reward aspects of games into software.The technique captured the attention of venture capitalists, one of whom said he considered gamification the most promising area in gaming.Another observed that half of all companies seeking funding for consumer software applications mentioned game design in their presentations.
  6. 6. GAMIFICATION  Gamification techniques strive to leverage people's natural desires for competition, achievement, status, self-expression, altruism, and closure.  A core gamification strategy is rewards for players who accomplish desired tasks. Types of rewards include points, achievement badges or levels, the filling of a progress bar, and providing the user with virtual currency.  Competition is another element of games that can be used in gamification. Making the rewards for accomplishing tasks visible to other players or providing leader boards are ways of encouraging players to compete.  Another approach to gamification is to make existing tasks feel more like games.Some techniques used in this approach include adding meaningful choice, onboarding with a tutorial, increasing challenge, and adding narrative.
  7. 7. SOCIAL LEARNING  Social learning is learning that takes place at a wider scale than individual or group learning, up to a societal scale, through social interaction between peers. It may or may not lead to a change in attitudes and behaviour. More specifically, to be considered social learning, a process must:  (1) demonstrate that a change in understanding has taken place in the individuals involved;  (2) demonstrate that this change goes beyond the individual and becomes situated within wider social units or communities of practice; and  (3) occur through social interactions and processes between actors within a social network  As such, social learning may be defined as a change in understanding that goes beyond the individual to become situated within wider social units or communities of practice through social interactions between actors within social networks.
  8. 8. MOBILE LEARNING (M-LEARNING)  The term m-learning or "mobile learning", has different meanings for different communities, that refer to a subset of e-learning, educational technology and distance education, that focuses on learning across contexts and learning with mobile devices. One definition of mobile learning is, "any sort of learning that happens when the learner is not at a fixed, predetermined location, or learning that happens when the learner takes advantage of the learning opportunities offered by mobile technologies."In other words, with the use of mobile devices, learners can learn anywhere and at any time.
  9. 9. MOBILE LEARNING  M-learning technologies include handheld computers, MP3 players, notebooks, mobile phones and tablets. M- learning focuses on the mobility of the learner, interacting with portable technologies, and learning that reflects a focus on how society and its institutions can accommodate and support an increasingly mobile population. There is also a new direction in m-learning that gives the instructor more mobility and includes creation of on the spot and in the field learning material that predominately uses smartphone with special software such as AHG Cloud Note. Using mobile tools for creating learning aides and materials becomes an important part of informal learning.
  10. 10. M-LEARNING  M-learning is convenient in that it is accessible from virtually anywhere. M-learning, like other forms of e- learning, is also collaborative. Sharing is almost instantaneous among everyone using the same content, which leads to the reception of instant feedback and tips. This highly active process has proven to increase exam scores from the fiftieth to the seventieth percentile, and cut the dropout rate in technical fields by 22 percent. M-learning also brings strong portability by replacing books and notes with small RAMs, filled with tailored learning contents. In addition, it is simple to utilize mobile learning for a more effective and entertaining experience
  11. 11. THANK YOU Reference – LikedIN HR Group, Wikipaedia on E-Learning, Social Learning, Mobile Learning, Gamification

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