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Teachers

‘ transmit’

feedback

messages

to

students about what is right or wrong in their
academic work,

about

its s...
T ORSUT
Rarely
Give

delayed feedback

M
ake
Do

give comments/
feedback

inappropriate comments

not know how to give...


pressure of work



too many commitments



L
aziness



L
ack of interest in open school learners’ work



L incen...





▪ Feedback should be as timely as possible.
Don’t wait until the end of the semester to give
feedback on discussio...
W Y DO ST
H
UDE S NE D
NT
E
F E ACK
E DB
?


T encourage them- build their confidence
o
by letting them know what they’re...
W Y DO ST
H
UDE S NE D
NT
E
F E ACK
E DB
?


T keep them on track- so they meet the
o
course goals and unit objectives.

...
W E T GIVE F E ACK
HN O
E DB
?
F
eedback should be


timely



Given at small intervals
H
ow……
H
OW T GIVE F E ACK
O
E DB
?


can be oral or written



should be constructive



specific and clear
Oral…….
Oral discussion—ONE
-ON-ONE or in GROUPS
Initial

classroom discussion-Use a whole group
discussion to respond to student...
•

W
hen it does not tell how to improve.

•

T
elling what is written but with no constructive comments.

•

W
ritten fee...


“what do you mean”?



“you have beaten about the bush”



“did you read your module before answering the
question”?
...
1. Comments that INDICAT a problem.
E
Comments such as• ‘M
ore needed here’ (a comment relating
to content)
• ‘P
oor struc...
2. Comments that CORRE a problem.
CT
Comments such as• ‘You should have included something about …
• ‘Your answer would ha...
3. Comments not only correct a problem, but also go on to
E L
XP AIN W Y. T ‘Correct’ comments can become ‘E
H
he
xplain’
...


Give comments as statements, not questions



Avoid making general, vague or meaningless
comments.



E
xplain commen...


P
oint out and explain irrelevant or missing
content.



Give students examples of how to re-word
awkward or confusing...
COM
ING UP……………………….

“GROUP W
ORK
”
Feedback on assignments.final
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Feedback on assignments.final

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The presentation describes about how to give feedback on Assignments submittted by learners in distance education.It depicts how to evaluate Tutor Marked Assignments.Various Dos and Don'ts are mentioned in the presentation.

Published in: Education, Technology
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Feedback on assignments.final

  1. 1. Teachers ‘ transmit’ feedback messages to students about what is right or wrong in their academic work, about its strengths and weaknesses, and students use this information to make subsequent improvements.
  2. 2. T ORSUT Rarely Give delayed feedback M ake Do give comments/ feedback inappropriate comments not know how to give comments
  3. 3.  pressure of work  too many commitments  L aziness  L ack of interest in open school learners’ work  L incentives ow L ack of training  W feedback…….. hy
  4. 4.    ▪ Feedback should be as timely as possible. Don’t wait until the end of the semester to give feedback on discussion and assignments. It is vital that you provide feedback to students before their next assignment is due so that they have time to digest your feedback and integrate it into the next assignment.
  5. 5. W Y DO ST H UDE S NE D NT E F E ACK E DB ?  T encourage them- build their confidence o by letting them know what they’re doing well.  T support them in diagnosing their o strengths and weaknesses.
  6. 6. W Y DO ST H UDE S NE D NT E F E ACK E DB ?  T keep them on track- so they meet the o course goals and unit objectives.  T help them improve their performance. o W hen…..
  7. 7. W E T GIVE F E ACK HN O E DB ? F eedback should be  timely  Given at small intervals H ow……
  8. 8. H OW T GIVE F E ACK O E DB ?  can be oral or written  should be constructive  specific and clear Oral…….
  9. 9. Oral discussion—ONE -ON-ONE or in GROUPS Initial classroom discussion-Use a whole group discussion to respond to students’ ideas for their assignments B rainstorming groups - Group discussion among students (according to topics) Peer response – Discussion among students on their drafts Negative………..
  10. 10. • W hen it does not tell how to improve. • T elling what is written but with no constructive comments. • W ritten feedback which is similar to everyone else’s. • T utor’s personal views on what issues they believe are important. • Negative feedback given in a way that makes one feel devalued. • If it is always negative = low self esteem = no motivation. • Negative followed by negative – makes you feel you can’t do anything right. • Negative feedback – when you’re trying hard but you get ‘put down’. Sample………
  11. 11.  “what do you mean”?  “you have beaten about the bush”  “did you read your module before answering the question”?  “reread your module and attempt the question once again”  “this is hopeless.”  “Reduce the number of words”
  12. 12. 1. Comments that INDICAT a problem. E Comments such as• ‘M ore needed here’ (a comment relating to content) • ‘P oor structure’ (a comment addressing a skill) are of this type.
  13. 13. 2. Comments that CORRE a problem. CT Comments such as• ‘You should have included something about … • ‘Your answer would have had a better structure if you had started with an introductory paragraph and also used shorter paragraphs throughout’ are of this type.
  14. 14. 3. Comments not only correct a problem, but also go on to E L XP AIN W Y. T ‘Correct’ comments can become ‘E H he xplain’ as follows: • ‘You should have included something about the actual data rates here because ...’ • ‘Your answer would have had a better structure if you had started with an introductory paragraph and also used shorter paragraphs throughout. T is because….’ his H to write……. ow
  15. 15.  Give comments as statements, not questions  Avoid making general, vague or meaningless comments.  E xplain comments (i.e., don’t just include a question mark, or say “needs work” or “good.”)  T the student what they did well and why, as ell well as where they went wrong and why.
  16. 16.  P oint out and explain irrelevant or missing content.  Give students examples of how to re-word awkward or confusing statements (rather than just saying “T is confusing” or “T could be his his better expressed.”)
  17. 17. COM ING UP………………………. “GROUP W ORK ”

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