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Dr Sue Greener Brighton Business School, University of Brighton, UK [email_address]
Photos courtesy of University of Brighton
<ul><li>Context of this study </li></ul><ul><li>Transition in Higher Education Institutions </li></ul><ul><li>What do pion...
November 2008 Picture courtesy of Microsoft Office online
<ul><li>Major impact on students’ learning (Trigwell 1995, Alexander 2001) </li></ul><ul><li>Community of Inquiry Framewor...
Different views of pedagogy drove the design of different kinds of online activity, assessment and control
Teachers’ expectations from the study relevant searching, reading within the course site and through weblinks,  posting me...
<ul><li>Reciprocity and co-operation enabled online – student/student interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Students taking over t...
<ul><li>Online feedback: more personalised potential </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing feedback with groups for later retrieval </...
Paulo Freire (1972)
<ul><li>Reconciling a directive teacher presence with more equal status with learners online </li></ul><ul><li>A challengi...
November 2008 Photo courtesy of Microsoft clips online
<ul><li>Alexander, S. (2001) 'E-learning developments and experiences',  Education and Training,  43, (4/5), 240-248 </li>...
Dr Sue Greener Brighton Business School, University of Brighton, UK [email_address] ,
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Identity crisis: who is teaching whom online?

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Presentation delivered at Estonian e-learning conference April 09

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Identity crisis: who is teaching whom online?

  1. 1. Dr Sue Greener Brighton Business School, University of Brighton, UK [email_address]
  2. 2. Photos courtesy of University of Brighton
  3. 3. <ul><li>Context of this study </li></ul><ul><li>Transition in Higher Education Institutions </li></ul><ul><li>What do pioneering teachers do with LCMS structures? </li></ul><ul><li>How are learner and teacher roles changing in this increasingly exciting environment? </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative Doctoral study exploring perspectives of pioneering teachers in HE </li></ul>Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office online
  4. 4. November 2008 Picture courtesy of Microsoft Office online
  5. 5. <ul><li>Major impact on students’ learning (Trigwell 1995, Alexander 2001) </li></ul><ul><li>Community of Inquiry Framework (Garrison, Anderson, Archer 2000) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Social, cognitive and teacher presence required for development of community of inquiry in graduate programmes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Aimed at higher order learning based on asynchronous computer conferencing </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6.
  7. 7. Different views of pedagogy drove the design of different kinds of online activity, assessment and control
  8. 8.
  9. 9. Teachers’ expectations from the study relevant searching, reading within the course site and through weblinks, posting messages and discussing, posting other artefacts and critiquing, following prepared courses of study, viewing, reviewing and evaluating information, reflecting and sharing through blogs, wikis and journals, doing tests and surveys, producing revision notes .
  10. 10.
  11. 11. <ul><li>Reciprocity and co-operation enabled online – student/student interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Students taking over teacher role </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile learning: ‘the processes of coming to know through conversations across multiple contexts </li></ul><ul><li>amongst people and </li></ul><ul><li>personal interactive </li></ul><ul><li>technologies’ (Sharples et </li></ul><ul><li>al 2009) </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Online feedback: more personalised potential </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing feedback with groups for later retrieval </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher pedagogy makes the difference – espoused theory is constructivist but theory-in-action? </li></ul>
  13. 13.
  14. 14. Paulo Freire (1972)
  15. 15. <ul><li>Reconciling a directive teacher presence with more equal status with learners online </li></ul><ul><li>A challenging shift in teachers’ understanding of teaching in Higher Education for some </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of “sole expert” identity can be a result of and input to the online learning and teaching process – becoming a “lead learner” </li></ul><ul><li>But increased power for teacher in design upfront – consistent with their pedagogy </li></ul><ul><li>OK – subject to the constraints of the technology and HEI policies! </li></ul><ul><li>Role conflicts? Role shifts? Challenging times! </li></ul>
  16. 16. November 2008 Photo courtesy of Microsoft clips online
  17. 17. <ul><li>Alexander, S. (2001) 'E-learning developments and experiences', Education and Training, 43, (4/5), 240-248 </li></ul><ul><li>Conole, G. and Dyke, M. (2004) 'What are the affordances of information and communication technologies?' ALT-J, Research in Learning Technology, 12, (2), 113-124 </li></ul><ul><li>Dron, J. (2006) Any color you like, as long as it's Blackboard Proceedings of World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2006 (2772-2779). Chesapeake, VA:AACE. </li></ul><ul><li>Freire, Paulo (2000) Pedagogy of the Oppressed (English translation) New York, Continuum (original edition 1972) </li></ul><ul><li>Garrison, D.R., Anderson, T. and Archer, W. (2000) 'Critical thinking in text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education', The Internet and Higher Education, 2, (2), 87-105 </li></ul><ul><li>Garrison, D.R. and Arbaugh, J.B. (2007) 'Researching the community of inquiry framework: Review, issues, and future directions', Internet and Higher Education, 10, 157-172 </li></ul><ul><li>Glaser, B. and Strauss, A. (1967) Discovery of grounded theory: Strategies for Qualitative Research. Alpine Publishing Co.: New York. </li></ul><ul><li>Greener, S.L. (2008a) Exploring Readiness for Online Learning. University of Brighton, School of Education, EdD Thesis </li></ul><ul><li>Greener, S.L. (2008b) 'Self-aware and Self-directed: Student Conceptions of Blended Learning', Merlot Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 4, (2), [Online]. Available at: http://jolt.merlot.org/vol4no2/greener0608.htm (Accessed: July 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>JISC Infonet Service (2006) Effective Use of VLEs: e-assessment . [Online] Available at: http://www.jiscinfonet.ac.uk/InfoKits/effective-use-of-VLEs/e-assessment (Accessed: August 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>Marzano, R. (2000) What works in classroom instructions. Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning: USA. </li></ul><ul><li>Mehanna, W.N. (2004) 'e-Pedagogy: the pedagogies of e-learning', ALT-J, Research in Learning Technology, 12, (3), 279-293 [Online] Available at http://dx.doi.org/ . Accessed: 10/03/06 </li></ul><ul><li>Palloff, R.M. and Pratt, K. (2001) Lessons from the Cyberspace Classroom: the Realities of Online Teaching. Jossey-Bass: San Francisco. </li></ul><ul><li>Palloff, R.M. and Pratt, K. (2003) The Virtual Student: a profile and guide to working with online learners. Jossey-Bass: San Francisco. </li></ul><ul><li>Salmon, G. (2000) E-moderating: The Key to Teaching and Learning Online. Kogan Page: London. </li></ul><ul><li>Sharples, M., Taylor, J. and Vavoula, G. (2009) A theory of learning for the Mobile Age (pre-print). [Online] Available at: www.lsri.nottingham.ac.uk/msh/Papers/Theory%20of%20Mobile%20Learning.pdf (Accessed: 26/03/09). </li></ul><ul><li>Trigwell, K. (1995) 'Increasing faculty understanding of teaching', in Successful Faculty Development Strategies. Anker Publishing: Bolton, MA, 76-100. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Dr Sue Greener Brighton Business School, University of Brighton, UK [email_address] ,

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