The development of self concept

4,491 views

Published on

An introduction to the development of the self-concept - Cooley's Looking Glass

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,491
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
69
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
66
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The development of self concept

  1. 1. (1)<br />The development of self<br />
  2. 2. Introduction<br />The origins of self are located in early childhood experience<br />
  3. 3. The concept of self<br />Humans characteristically act with self-awareness, exercise self-control, exhibit conscience, guilt and make decisions based on some imagery of what they are, what they have been, and what they hope to be.<br />The wider social community enters the person through its language, which in turn furnishes the foundations for the self.<br />
  4. 4. Body awareness and body display<br />Who’s that?<br />Surveillance<br />Mead (1934) – to have a sense of self is to be able to objectify your activity as being separate from that of others - the child must be able to see himself from the perspective of others – the child’s knowledge of self is contingent on a separation of self from others<br />
  5. 5. Self-awareness – Cooley’s Looking Glass self<br />How do I look?<br />What kind of impression am I making?<br />What are they thinking of me?<br />Consider how aware of your sense of self you are when you stand down here!<br />You may be thinking.......<br />
  6. 6. Development of identity<br />Cooley’s Looking Glass Self<br />Identities are created through social interaction and social relationships<br />I know who I am by understanding how others see me<br />
  7. 7. Looking glass<br />‘As we see our face, figure, and dress in the glass, and are interested in them because they are ours, and pleased or otherwise with them according to what we should like them to be, so in our imagination we perceive in other’s mind some thought of our own appearance, manners, aims, deeds, character, friends and so on, and are variously affected by it’ (Cooley, 1902, p.184). <br />

×