Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Open cross institutional academic cpd: unlocking the potential

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 47 Ad

Open cross institutional academic cpd: unlocking the potential

Download to read offline

Chrissi Nerantzi and Sue Beckingham presenting at the 19th Annual SEDA Conference 13-14 November 2014, Nottingham

Redecker et al (2011, 9) note that “The overall vision is that personalisation, collaboration and informalisation (informal learning) will be at the core of learning in the future. “ Our world is changing rapidly. Educators need to quickly adapt and change and develop new learning and teaching strategies that are fit for our times. Informal networks and open development opportunities enabled and extended through digital technologies are valuable to connect with other practitioners, share practices, support each other and innovate in collaboration with others within and beyond their own institutions.

Seely Brown (2012, 14) talked about the “Big Shift” driven by “digital innovation” and characterised by “exponential change and emergence, socially and culturally”. Can we afford to stay where we are and do what we always did? Or is there a need for academic development to maximise on opportunities to remain current, innovate but also model flexible, forward facing and sustainable practices which connect, engage and have the potential to transform practices and enhance the student experience. The European Commission(2013) calls institutions to join-up and open-up. Could this be a sustainable solution for academic CPD?

Bring Your Own Devices for Learning (BYOD4L) is an open development opportunity for educators and students, developed by academic developers in two institutions. It builds on open learning ecologies (Jackson, 2013), the concept of lifewide learning (Jackson, 2014) and the ethos of sharing, collaboration and co-creation of pedagogical interventions and collective innovation within a supportive community enabled through social media. BYOD4L brought individuals together to learn how they can use their smart devices for learning through reflection and active experimentation. BYOD4L has been offered twice so far, initially with a group of distributed facilitators and then with five participating institutions. Expectations and value of BYOD4L from both iterations will be shared with delegates. The open CPD framework developed maximised on the expertise and the resources available by the community and participating individuals and institutions and created a rich and diverse and multimodal learning ecology. This is the approach adopted in BYOD4L. Does the open cross-institutional CPD framework developed present an attractive solution for institutions more widely that has the potential to normalise the use of technology for learning?

Chrissi Nerantzi and Sue Beckingham presenting at the 19th Annual SEDA Conference 13-14 November 2014, Nottingham

Redecker et al (2011, 9) note that “The overall vision is that personalisation, collaboration and informalisation (informal learning) will be at the core of learning in the future. “ Our world is changing rapidly. Educators need to quickly adapt and change and develop new learning and teaching strategies that are fit for our times. Informal networks and open development opportunities enabled and extended through digital technologies are valuable to connect with other practitioners, share practices, support each other and innovate in collaboration with others within and beyond their own institutions.

Seely Brown (2012, 14) talked about the “Big Shift” driven by “digital innovation” and characterised by “exponential change and emergence, socially and culturally”. Can we afford to stay where we are and do what we always did? Or is there a need for academic development to maximise on opportunities to remain current, innovate but also model flexible, forward facing and sustainable practices which connect, engage and have the potential to transform practices and enhance the student experience. The European Commission(2013) calls institutions to join-up and open-up. Could this be a sustainable solution for academic CPD?

Bring Your Own Devices for Learning (BYOD4L) is an open development opportunity for educators and students, developed by academic developers in two institutions. It builds on open learning ecologies (Jackson, 2013), the concept of lifewide learning (Jackson, 2014) and the ethos of sharing, collaboration and co-creation of pedagogical interventions and collective innovation within a supportive community enabled through social media. BYOD4L brought individuals together to learn how they can use their smart devices for learning through reflection and active experimentation. BYOD4L has been offered twice so far, initially with a group of distributed facilitators and then with five participating institutions. Expectations and value of BYOD4L from both iterations will be shared with delegates. The open CPD framework developed maximised on the expertise and the resources available by the community and participating individuals and institutions and created a rich and diverse and multimodal learning ecology. This is the approach adopted in BYOD4L. Does the open cross-institutional CPD framework developed present an attractive solution for institutions more widely that has the potential to normalise the use of technology for learning?

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

Slideshows for you (20)

Advertisement

Similar to Open cross institutional academic cpd: unlocking the potential (20)

More from Sue Beckingham (20)

Advertisement

Recently uploaded (20)

Open cross institutional academic cpd: unlocking the potential

  1. 1. Open cross-institutional academic CPD, expectations and value: a recent example – UNLOCKING THE POTENTIAL 19th Annual SEDA Conference 13-14 November 2014, Nottingham Chrissi Nerantzi Academic Developer Manchester Metropolitan University @chrissinerantzi Sue Beckingham Academic Developer Sheffield Hallam University @suebecks artwork by Ellie Livermore
  2. 2. Learning outcomes • Explore the concept of open academic Continuous Professional Development (CPD) for personal and collective growth • Gain an insight into an open cross-institutional academic CPD initiative as normalised practice based on collaborative pedagogies and developed using social media. • Invite opportunities for further development of open cross-institutional CPD and wider collaboration among institutions
  3. 3. exploring open CPD
  4. 4. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 interested in course themes interested in open course design used new ideas professional development for application research interest sharing experiences, learning with and from others, networking frequency frequency WHY? Reasons for joining #BYOD4L, January 14
  5. 5. Our findings are inline with Bennett (2012) but... • we had a wider range of practitioners, not only early adopters, digital and less-digital practitioners • we had participants from different institutions Digital Practitioner Framework (Bennett, 2012) based on Beetham & Sharpe (2010)
  6. 6. Voices • ecological university (Barnett, 2011) • personalisation, collaboration, informalisation (Redecker et al, 2011) but also formalisation of informal learning • a new culture of learning and the power of the collective (Douglas & Seely Brown, 2011) • a need for a national initiative on cost-effective teaching when resources are reduced (Gibbs, 2012) • blending of formal & informal learning (Conole, 2013) • call to open-up, join-up (European Commission, 2013) • the danger of monocultures (Weller, 2014) • lifewide curriculum (Jackson, 2014)
  7. 7. a scalable model for open cross-institutional CPD?
  8. 8. Starting here? Or...
  9. 9. BYOD4L: an example from practice
  10. 10. Bring Your Own Device for Learning
  11. 11. What did we want to explore... Can we create an open learning ecology that enables learners to learn with and from each other in a supportive environment using authentic and inquiry-based pedagogical models? How can we support open learners effectively to create the foundations of a vibrant learning community? How can we scale open CPD through informal cross-institutional collaboration?
  12. 12. BYOD4L is... mobile flexible collaborative authentic practice-based inquiry-based autonomous self-organised self-determined pick ‘n’ mix bite-size learning supported registration-free for teachers & students rewarding achievement volunteer facilitators blended BYOD4Learning course MELSIG Book project MELSIG Smart Learning event #3 Nerantzi & Uhlin, 2012; Nerantzi, 2014: Nerantzi, submitted)
  13. 13. 5C Framework (Nerantzi & Beckingham, 2014) 5C linear visualisation 5C non-linear visualisation
  14. 14. some numbers Jan 14 July 14 organisers 2 2 facilitators 11 16 student facilitators facilitators home institutions 9 8 course reviewer 1 institutions 5 open badges lead 1 1 badges reviewer 1 2 critical friend 1 1 artist 1 1
  15. 15. January 2014
  16. 16. extending BYOD4L through F2F local engagement
  17. 17. BYOD4L answer garden 1 February 14 http://answergarden.ch/view/80135
  18. 18. Who filled out the survey voluntarily? 74 66 Outside of UK: • Australia • Canada • Hong Kong • Jordan • USA 22 students 51 Professionals (majority: Academics, Academic Developers, Learning Technologists) Warning! Incomplete picture
  19. 19. We got some ‘well kitted’ learners who use a variety of devices but show preference towards smart devices (smart phones and tablets). 6. How frequently do you use the following devices for learning and/or teaching? usage of devices for L & T Smartphone Tablet Digital camera Camcorder Audio recorder 26% 28% 18% 11% 17% Total never rarely sometimes regulary No Response smartphone 75 10 8 12 45 2 tablet 72 3 7 18 44 5 digital camera 71 12 19 21 19 6 camcorder 67 22 20 20 5 10 audio recorder 72 11 24 23 14 5
  20. 20. We got about 50% digital learners who were confident with social media and networked learning and wanted to learn more about mobile learning 8. Tick the degree of experience you have in the following areas. 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Total Open learning not experienced at all experience Open course organiser Using social media for learning Networked learning Series1 not very experienced experienced very experienced Mobile learning No Response open learning 75 9 20 34 12 2 open course organiser 75 32 27 12 4 2 using social media for learning 75 4 24 34 13 2 networked learning 75 6 17 38 14 2 mobile learning 74 7 28 29 10 3
  21. 21. Individuals were confident, comfortable and experienced in such spaces and joined us for CPD (according to the initial survey). Question How can we attract individuals who are less confident and experienced?
  22. 22. Facilitators as co-learners in a collaborative open course for teachers and students in Higher Education A study of the facilitator experience using qualitative data from survey 100% January 2014 • The social glue: creating a community of facilitators using social media • Facilitators as co-learners • Tweetchats, more than just chats • Global offer and time zones challenges • Making time a challenge for facilitators (Nerantzi, Middleton & Beckingham, 2014)
  23. 23. positive relationships/social interdependence (Deutsch, 1949) promotive interaction trusting caring sharing supporting community achieve common goals Veletsianos (2014, online) talks about “social media as places where some academics express and experience care.”
  24. 24. July 2014
  25. 25. Design for learning Nerantzi & Beckingham (2014) based on Nerantzi, Uhlin & Kvarnström (2013)
  26. 26. open to all 5 institutions supporting BYOD4L
  27. 27. the BYOD4L team (July 2014) 16 facilitators 5 institutions 2 peer reviewers 1 artist Ellie Livermore, artist
  28. 28. on air hangout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6nEimzL ZY4
  29. 29. The collaborative #byod4l poem In the digital jungle Reaching out into the chaotic, swirling abyss Feeling that e-learning can be so hit and miss I want to avoid device apathy and neglect But what does it mean to really connect? So onwards we go But where, do we know? Wouldn’t it be great? If we all started to communicate Curating a task, can be quite unfamiliar, belonging in museums, art galleries and similar. With mobile devices we curate a different way Sharing resources with scoop it and mendeley Five brief days, so short and sweet In Twitter and Google we gathered to meet Inspired to explore, discuss and create Minds now expanded; an enlightened state Knowledge isn’t just facts Or historical acts Its cerebral energy we state When we start to create But this isn’t the end! We now each have a valuable PLN to tend Our #BYOD4L community will continue to grow Help us reach out to let others know contributors 1 Sam Illingworth 2 Neil Withnell 3 Ian Guest 4 Peter Reed 5 Carol Haigh 6 Sue Beckingham The Digital Jungle by BYOD4Learning is licensed under aCreative Commons Attribution- ShareAlike 4.0 International License. •Learning about collaborative learning through collaborating. •Learning about open educational resources through making. •Learning about creative commons licences through choosing one.
  30. 30. #BYOD4Lchat code by Martin Hawskey visualisation for BYOD4L by Peter Reed 1 2 3 4 5 1-5
  31. 31. open cross-institutional CPD: further opportunities
  32. 32. January 2015
  33. 33. cross-institutional #BYOD4L 12 – 16 Jan 15 Is your institution joining us?
  34. 34. NEW!!! including student facilitators/mentors
  35. 35. Are you interested in joining us? Still time!
  36. 36. What next? • Further research linked to the open scalable cross-institutional CPD model, open badges, Tweetchats • Open facilitators’ experiences project (work-in-progress) • Getting ready for BYOD4L in January 15!!! • …
  37. 37. special thank yous... ... to all our collaborators, institutions, participants as well as our very own artist Ellie Livermore. We thank them all for embracing this project, their commitment and energy. BYOD4L would not have been possible without them!!! ... the journey continues...
  38. 38. References Beetham and Sharpe, (2010), ‘Developing Digital Literacies Framework’, available fromhttp://jiscdesignstudio.pbworks.com/w/file/40474958/Literacies%20development%20framework.doc, date accessed 11th April 2014 Bennett, L. (2012) Learning from the early adopters: Web2.0 tools, pedagogic patters and the development of the digital practitioner, Doctoral thesis, University of Huddersfield. Cormier, D. (2008) Rhizomatic Education: Community as Curriculum, Innovate. Journal of Online Education, V 4 No 5, Jun-Jul 2008, available at http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ840362 Deutsch, M. (1949) A theory of cooperation and competition, in: Human Relations, 2, pp. 129-152. Dougkas, T. & Seely Brown, J. (2011) A new culture of learning. Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change, Galley, R., Conole, G, Dalziel, J and Ghiglione, E. (2010). Cloudworks as a ‘pedagogical wrapper’ for LAMS sequences: supporting the sharing of ideas across professional boundaries and facilitating collaborative design, evaluation and critical reflection. LAMS and Learning Design. A. Alexander, J. Dalziel, J. Krajka and R. Kiely. Nicosia, University of Nicosia Press. 2: pp. 37-50. Gibbs, G. (2012) Implications of ‘Dimensions of quality’ in a market environment, York: HEA. Jackson, N. J. (2013) The Concept of Learning Ecologies in N Jackson and G B Cooper (Eds) Lifewide Learning, Education and Personal Development E-Book. Chapter A5 available at http://www.lifewideebook.co.uk/uploads/1/0/8/4/10842717/chapter_a5.pdf [accessed 9 February 2014] Luckin, R., Clark, W., Garnett, F., Whitworth, A., Akass, J., Cook, J., Day, P., Ecclesfield, N., Hamilton, T. and Robertson, J. (2010) Learner Generated Contexts: a framework to support the effective use of technology to support learning, in: Lee, M. J. W. & McLoughlin, C. (eds) Web 2.0-Based E-Learning: Applying Social Informatics for Tertiary Teaching, IGI Global, pp. 70-84., available at http://knowledgeillusion.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/bookchapterluckin2009learnergeneratedcontexts.pdf [accessed 25 January 2014] Nerantzi, C. & Uhlin, L. (2012) FISh, available at http://fdol.wordpress.com/design/ Nerantzi, C. (submitted) Conceptions of open learners using FISh, a Problem-Based Learning design, used in a professional development course for teachers in higher education Nerantzi, C (2014) A personal journey of discoveries through a DIY open course development for professional development of teachers in Higher Education (invited paper),Journal of Pedagogic Development, University of Bedfordshire, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 42-58 http://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd Nerantzi, C., Middleton, A. & Beckingham, S. (i2014) Facilitators as co-learners in a collaborative open course for teachers and students in Higher Education, in: Learning in cyberphysical worlds, eLearning paper, issue No. 39. Nerantzi, C & Beckingham, S (2014) BYOD4L – Our Magical Open Box to Enhance Individuals’ Learning Ecologies, in: Jackson, N. & Willis, J. (eds.) Lifewide Learning and Education in Universities and Colleges E-Book, avaialable athttp://www.learninglives.co.uk/e-book.html. Siemens, G. (2002) "Elearning Course," elearnspace, August 27, 2002, available at http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/elearningcourse.htm [accessed 8 February 2014]. Veletsianos, G. (2013). Learner Experiences with MOOCs and Open Online Learning. Hybrid Pedagogy. Available at http://learnerexperiences.hybridpedagogy.com [accessed6 May 2014] Wenger, E., White, N. & Smith J. D. (2009) Digital Habitats. Stewarding technology for communities, Portland: CPsquare.

Editor's Notes

  • Part 1 (10 mins): Discussion about open academic CPD across the sector
     
    Delegates will have the opportunity to discuss with colleagues from other institutions examples of open CPD, initiatives where staff learn in partnership with students, share experiences and perspectives on how innovative academic CPD can take advantage of technologies to extend engagement as well as create new opportunities for personal and collective growth.
  • Just as a reminder: please don’t copy, I have used these exact lines elsewhere:
    A significant study undertaken by Bennett (2012) indicates that academics who are early adopters of technology are keen to explore the pedagogical use of digital technologies and especially social media if they can apply learning to their own practice to enhance the student experience. Bennett, explored the experience and behaviours of early adopters of social media for learning in one institution and how they developed the skills needed. Her research showed that these academics are confident and driven to explore new pedagogical approaches supported by technology and are willing to invest the time needed to develop new skills and practices that would benefit their students.
  • Barnett, R (2011) The coming of the ecological university, in: Oxford Review of Education, Vol. 37, Issue 4, 2011, Taylor & Francis, pp. 439-455.
    European Commission (2013) High Level Group on the Modernisation of Higher Education. Report to the European Commission on Improving the quality of teaching and learning in Europe’s higher education institutions, European Union, available at http://ec.europa.eu/education/higher-education/doc/modernisation_en.pdf [accessed 20 February 2014]
    Redecker, C., Leis, M., Leendertse, M., Punie, Y., Gijsbers, G., Kirschner, P. Stoyanov, S. and Hoogveld, B. (2011) The Future of Learning: Preparing for Change. European Commission Joint Research Centre Institute for Prospective Technological Studies EUR 24960 EN Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union.
    http://ipts.jrc.ec.europa.eu/publications/pub.cfm?id=4719 [accessed 21 February 2014]
    Jackson, N. J. (2014) Lifewide Learning and Education in Universities & Colleges: Concepts and Conceptual Aids, in N.J. Jackson and J. Willis (Eds) Lifewide Learning and Education in Universities and Colleges. Chapter A1 Available at: http://www.learninglives.co.uk/e-book.html








    Christine Redecker
  • little and big OER! Martin Weller!
    MOOCs only??? other creations, DIY, innovation comes in all shapes and sizes
  • Part 2 (25mins): Sharing the BYOD4L project, an open cross-institutional academic CPD opportunity developed at MMU and SHU
     
    The open cross-institutional CPD intervention BYOD4L developed by the presenters will be discussed with delegates. Findings linked to expectations and value of BYOD4L for participants and facilitators will be discussed together with the rationale for the development of BYOD4L and lessons learnt.
  • 22 badges
  • Smartphone 57
    Tablet 62
    Digital camera 40
    Camcorder 25
    Audio recorder 37
  • Open learning 46 (61%)
    Open course organiser 16 (21%)
    Using social media for learning 47 (63%)
    Networked learning 52 (69%)
    Mobile learning 39 (53%)
  • Deutsch (1949)
    Social interdependence : achieving individual goals are affected by actions of others
    Positive interdependence: reaching goals when others they work with cooperatively also reach their goals, promoting each others efforts to achieve the goal


    social interdependence theory (Deutsch, 1949)
    we developed positive interdependence> reaching goals when others they work with cooperatively also reach their goals, promoting each others efforts to achieve the goal

    promotive interaction> move from self-interest to mutual interest
    openness, positive resolution of challenges, emotional connection
  • flyer
  • https://docs.google.com/document/d/15DOGqi0Y4Q2G2iXK_VIkVuQprpLNCahrJKBKou6Rrqs/edit?usp=sharing
  • Part 3 (10 mins): Extending opportunities for collaboration – discussion, sharing ideas, identifying opportunities
     
    We will discuss with the delegates how the open CPD framework developed for BYOD4L could be developed further and invite opportunities for collaboration to join up initiatives and enable cross-institutional fertilisation and learning in partnership with educators and students.

×