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Leading by example: being belonging and becoming digital citizens

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Leading by example: being belonging and becoming digital citizens

  1. 1. Leading by Example: Being, Belonging and Becoming Digital Citizens Sue Beckingham, Sheffield Hallam University Keynote #DigitalEd Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology 6th May 2020
  2. 2. Being, Belonging and Becoming Sue Beckingham NTF, CMBE, SFHEA, FSEDA, CMALT, MSc TELIC, MA, PgCLTHE National Teaching Fellow | Principal Lecturer in Digital Analytics and Technologies | LTA Lead for Computing | Educational Developer (TEL) | Visiting Fellow Edge Hill University Sheffield Hallam University | Department of Computing | College of Business, Technology and Engineering | S1 1WB | T: 0114 225 6923 | E: s.beckingham@shu.ac.uk
  3. 3. Perception
  4. 4. The Quality of Life Model The extent of a person's Quality of Life in the areas of Being, Belonging, and Becoming and their sub-domains is determined by two factors: importance and enjoyment. Used in research projects carried out by the Quality of Life Research Unit, was developed at the Centre for Health Promotion, University of Toronto.
  5. 5. Quality of Life model Being who one is Belonging connections with one’s environment Becoming achieving personal goals, hopes, and aspirations Physical being Physical belonging Practical belonging Psychological being Social belonging Leisure becoming Spiritual being Community belonging Growth becoming
  6. 6. Being who one is Belonging connections with one’s environment Becoming achieving personal goals, hopes, and aspirations Physical Being physical health personal hygiene nutrition exercise grooming and clothing general physical appearance Physical Belonging home workplace school/college/university neighbourhood community Practical Becoming domestic activities paid work school or volunteer activities seeing to health or social needs. Psychological Being psychological health and adjustment cognitions feelings self-esteem, self-concept and self- control Social Belonging intimate others family friends co-workers neighbourhood and community Leisure Becoming activities that promote relaxation and stress reduction Spiritual being personal values personal standards of conduct spiritual beliefs Community Belonging adequate income health and social services employment educational programs recreational programs community events and activities Growth Becoming activities that promote the maintenance or improvement of knowledge and skills adapting to change.
  7. 7. Being who one is Belonging connections with one’s environment Becoming achieving personal goals, hopes, and aspirations Physical Being • My appearance - how I look • Making healthy choices - alcohol, drugs, smoking Physical Belonging • The earth and its environment • Feeling safe at school, in the neighbourhood and when I go out Practical Becoming • Looking after myself and my appearance • The work I do at a job while still a student Psychological Being • Being independent • Knowing where I am going Social Belonging • Being appreciated by others • The friends I have Leisure Becoming • Participating sports and recreation activities • Visiting and spending time with others Spiritual being • Having hope for the future • Feeling that life has meaning Community Belonging • Being able to access medical/social services on my own • Having things to do in my community in my spare time Growth Becoming • Planning for a job or career • Solving my problems
  8. 8. The D3BsC model Middleton (2019)
  9. 9. 1) communities can be intended as a set of people who have something in common; 2) communities can be intended as groups of people who interact. Tardini and Cantoni 2005 Developing a sense of belonging within communities
  10. 10. Belong can also equate to be rightly classified be in the right place or situation be suitable or acceptable be owned
  11. 11. The antonym of belong free independent self-governing autonomous self-sufficient liberated
  12. 12. Belonging Distanced
  13. 13. A sense of belonging is deeply important to emotional health and personal wellbeing. Individuals develop a sense of belonging when they feel that they are part of a larger community that they believe in - a community that welcomes them, a community that respects and represents their values, and a community that helps them to fulfil their aspirations. Individuals develop a sense of belonging when they feel connected to other people, especially those who share their distinct life experiences, interests, or goals The Belonging Project, Stanford University ???
  14. 14. https://twitter.com/lizandmollie/status/1150109074098253824?s=20
  15. 15. True belonging doesn't require us to change who we are. It requires us to be who we are. Brené Brown
  16. 16. The concept of space and place Space becomes place when it acquires symbolic meaning and a concrete definition, marking the whole spectrum of identity and sense of belonging. Tsatsou 2009
  17. 17. The importance of dialogue
  18. 18. Who’s actively listening?
  19. 19. AND to continue this dialogue face to face CREATORS CURATORS CRITICS CONVERSATIONALISTS COLLABORATORS COMMUNICATORS Social Media EMPOWERS individuals to become digital: Beckingham 2013 http://www.slideshare.net/suebeckingham/scholarship-and-social-media
  20. 20. The conversation continuum monologue debate discussion dialogue Rozenthuler 2019
  21. 21. The conversation continuum • Monologue One person speaks and the other/s listen. A leader holding a ‘townhall’ to transmit a message to a large audience can be an effective way to communicate. The risk is, however, that the other people aren’t fully engaged. The speaker is often ‘downloading’ information that they already know and others switch off. • Debate An exchange where one person puts forward an argument to support their point of view and another challenges it with a counter-argument. Whist this can be lively as people ‘nail their colours to the mast’, it often results in people taking fixed positions and becoming entrenched. The combative atmosphere limits learning. • Discussion A conversation where people analyse options and try to decide on a way forward. The root of the word ‘discussion’ is the same as ‘percussion’ and ‘concussion’ and means to ‘shake apart’ or ‘break down.’ Whilst a discussion can be a useful way to explore the respective pros and cons, it rarely leads to fresh thinking. • Dialogue A meaningful conversation where people think together about new possibilities. Coming from the Greek, dia,meaning ‘through’ and logos meaning ‘word’, the essence of dialogue is the flow of meaning that comes through an exchange of words. When people slow down and speak about what is moving through them in-the-moment, new ideas and deeper insights emerge. Rozenthuler 2019
  22. 22. “Collaboration is important not just because it's a better way to learn. The sprit of collaboration is penetrating every institution and all of our lives. So learning to collaborate is part of equipping yourself for effectiveness, problem solving, innovation and life-long learning in an ever changing networked society. ” Don Tapscott 2013
  23. 23. Social is a behaviour, not a channel Most people visit social networking sites to connect with others: to stay in touch with friends and family; to share things with colleagues and peers; and even to meet strangers with similar interests and needs. There are times when technology plays an important part in facilitating these connections; the filters on Instagram, or the sharing features common to most social networks, are important parts of the social networking experience. However, for most people, social media are just means to an end, with that ‘end’ being social interaction. Simon Kemp 2014:21
  24. 24. HEA Framework for partnership in learning and teaching HEA 2014
  25. 25. Students as Partners Values authenticity all parties have a meaningful rationale for investing in partnership, and are honest about what they can contribute and the parameters of partnership inclusivity partnership embraces the different talents, perspectives and experiences that all parties bring, and there are no barriers (structural or cultural) that prevent potential partners getting involved reciprocity all parties have an interest in, and stand to benefit from, working and/or learning in partnership empowerment power is distributed appropriately and all parties are encouraged to constructively challenge ways of working and learning that may reinforce existing inequalities trust all parties take time to get to know each other, engage in open and honest dialogue and are confident they will be treated with respect and fairness challenge all parties are encouraged to constructively critique and challenge practices, structures and approaches that undermine partnership, and are enabled to take risks to develop new ways of working and learning community all parties feel a sense of belonging and are valued fully for the unique contribution they make responsibility all parties share collective responsibility for the aims of the partnership, and individual responsibility for the contribution they make (HEA 2014 cited by Healey et al 2014)
  26. 26. Engagement is not a goal, it's an outcome of trust and responsibility Sylvia Libow Martinez @smartinez
  27. 27. Examples of multimodal approaches to learning and teaching; creating digital objects to re-visit and reflect on, and using social media to share student achievements.
  28. 28. Capturing students’ reflections of their concerns as they start university Embed infographic in Blackboard
  29. 29. Helping staff to identify and use social media tools for communication and collaboration within and beyond the classroom. Learning Activities Showcasing Learning Helping students to prepare digital portfolios to openly share outcomes and projects to develop a professional online presence. Organising Learning Helping students and staff to identify and use relevant social media tools to curate and organise information relating to learning. Student led special interest group (rebranded as SMASH by the students!)
  30. 30. Framework – The Four Pillars Helping staff to identify and use social media tools for communication and collaboration within & beyond the classroom. Learning Activities Showcasing Learning Helping students to prepare digital portfolios to openly share outcomes & projects to develop a professional online presence. Organising Learning Helping students & staff to identify & use relevant social media tools to curate & organise information relating to learning. Student Support Helping students to find resources online to support their wellbeing & academic studies whilst at University.
  31. 31. Resources Guest blog post for Sheffield Hallam University and Social Media for learning blog All have been given a Creative Commons License 7 Things you can use… *[add social media tool] in learning and teaching Reverse Social Media What do we want to achieve and how can social media help CARD ACTIVITY BLOG POSTS CARD ACTIVITY
  32. 32. Curating Learning Mind Mapping Networking Presentations Storage To Do Lists Card activity
  33. 33. The cards were inspired by 7 Things you should know about... Each brief focuses on a single practice or technology and describes what it is, how it works, where it is going, and why it matters to teaching and learning. https://library.educause.edu/
  34. 34. Guest blog post in response to COVID19
  35. 35. Guest blog post 2
  36. 36. How might our students share their stories and inspire others?
  37. 37. HOW can organisations help staff make good use of social media? 1 Encourage CPD time and share exemplars of how to get started 2 3 4 Empower staff to use social networks in the workplace Share stories about staff achievements Senior Management acting as role models
  38. 38. HOW can individuals make good use of social media? 1 Understand the importance of having a relevant bio on their own online profiles 2 3 4 Connect with other professionals outside of your own institutional network of peers Take advantage of anytime anyplace CPD opportunities and realise the value of self-determined learning Developing and owning their own professional online presence by sharing achievements of self AND others
  39. 39. What you can share on social media Add • presentations to SlideShare and sharing also on your LinkedIn profile • your publications to your LinkedIn profile: articles, press releases, papers, books and chapters • projects you are involved in along with the names of those you are collaborating with Write • guest posts for other peoples’ blogs, websites and digital magazines • your own blog and share a link via Twitter • a LinkedIn post and updates which include links to useful content
  40. 40. The importance of sharing the ups and downs
  41. 41. http://lornamcampbell.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Starting-CMALT-Advice-from-the-community.pdf/ 7 pages of tweets captured
  42. 42. Plutchik's wheel of emotions Easily missed when online
  43. 43. Early day emoticons • :) = SMILE • :D = SMILE/LAUGHING/BIG GRIN • ;) = WINK • :X = MY LIPS ARE SEALED • :P = STICKING OUT TONGUE • { } = HUG • :( = FROWN • :'( = CRYING • 0:) = ANGEL • }:> = DEVIL
  44. 44. #ScientistsWhoSelfie – How sharing selfies can build trust in science Selfies – don’t just capture an in-the-moment experience. For scientists, taking and sharing selfies has the potential to dissolve stereotypes. One stereotype in particular that plagues scientists, is that of the ‘mad scientist’, a caricature of Albert Einstein – an old, white, man in a lab coat, intelligent, but also awkward, aloof, alone. This stereotype may seem innocuous, but it can also be harmful, as it sets scientists and science apart from society, limiting both public understanding and trust in science. Carmichael 2019 LSE Impact Blog
  45. 45. So do selfies, or self-portraits, change people’s stereotypes of scientists? The team hypothesised that images of diverse, friendly scientists providing a glimpse of their everyday work may help change the stereotype that scientists are competent but not warm. #ScientistsWhoSelfie Carmichael 2019 LSE Impact Blog
  46. 46. #ScientistsWhoSelfie • Implications for outreach and education • Demonstrated how diverse science is • Promoted interactions between scientists, educators and the public • Students engaged able to engage with the community they aspire to belong to • Foster open learning communities • Share insights into research • Engage citizens in conversations about research Carmichael 2019 LSE Impact Blog
  47. 47. Helen Webster's @scholastic_rat 10 Days of Twitter https://10daysoftwitter.wordpress.com/
  48. 48. Snapchat is a multimedia messaging app. One of the principal features of Snapchat is that pictures and messages are usually only available for a short time before they become inaccessible to their recipients, unless you use the Group chat function and photos from your camera roll rather than through the app. Using Snapchat as a tutorial tool Suzanne Faulkner @SFaulknerPandO • Snapchat is where your students ‘are’, meet them there! • Your students can see when you are available to Snap. • Instant communication with your whole tutorial group at once. • Your students can support each other, under your supervision.
  49. 49. Using Snapchat as a tutorial tool Suzanne Faulkner @SFaulknerPandO “It’s a lot less formal so can ask a question and have a conversation about something without a well planned out question and having to structure it all.” “You don’t just see your questions, you see everyone’s and sometimes it’s things you didn’t think about before.” “I find it to be less formal, and more comfortable to ask multiple questions compared to e-mails. ” “Snapchat tutorial is good because I actually enjoy reading the info, and I can absorb key information on the go, without feeling as though I have to sit down and study.” “Because of a quick response, it gives the impression of a conversation and can get a better rapport with both lecturer and class mates.” https://suzannessnapchat.wordpress.com/
  50. 50. Follow @LTHEchat https://lthechat.com/ Wednesday 8-9pm #LTHEchat 175: Teaching as performance: performative aspects of teaching in higher education with guest host Dr Richard Bale @RichBale
  51. 51. https://www.openbookpublishers.com/htmlreader/978-1-78374-668-2/ch3.xhtml
  52. 52. A word of caution Although using social media, particularly twitter, can be a great way to amplify and disseminate your blog posts, it’s important to be aware that social media can be a hostile environment, particularly for women, people of colour and marginalised groups, who may experience targeted harassment. You should never feel obliged to engage with social media, particularly if you feel unsafe or attacked. Your online safety is of paramount importance. https://thinking.is.ed.ac.uk/professional-blogging/2018/09/18/amplifying-your-blog-with-social-media/ Lorna teaches a monthly workshop on Blogging to Build your Professional Profile The webpage of resources includes this section
  53. 53. knowledge networks online presence PERSONAL IMPACT what you say emotional connection energy empathy experience
  54. 54. References Beckingham, S. (2013) Social Media and the Digital Scholar. https://www.slideshare.net/suebeckingham/scholarship-and-social-media Beckingham, S., Wood, C., Paddon, J., Butler, A., Trueman, M. and Rooney, C. (2019) A SMASHing approach for developing staff and student digital capabilities within a Community of Practice. Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership and Change, 5(1) 'Championing Student-Staff Partnerships in an Age of Change'. Available from: https://journals.studentengagement.org.uk/index.php/studentchangeagents/article/view/923/pdf Carmichael, B. (2019) #ScientistsWhoSelfie – How sharing selfies can build trust in science https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2019/07/03/scientistswhoselfie-how-sharing-selfies-can-build-trust-in-science/ HEA (2014) Framework for partnership in learning and teaching. Higher Education Academy. Available from: https://www.advance- he.ac.uk/guidance/teaching-and-learning/student-engagement-through-partnership Healey, M., Flint, A. and Harrington, K. (2014) Engagement through partnership: students as partners in learning and teaching in higher education. Available from: https://www.advance-he.ac.uk/knowledge-hub/engagement-through-partnership-students-partners-learning-and- teaching-higher Kemp, S. (2014) Social Brands Ebook. We are Social. http://wearesocial.sg/blog/2014/04/social-brands-ebook-2/ Middleton, A. (2020) Identity and the D3BsC Model. https://tactilelearning.wordpress.com/2020/01/04/identity-and-the-d3bsc-model- a-briefing/ Quality of Life Research Group. (nd) The Quality of Life Model http://sites.utoronto.ca/qol/qol_model.htm Rozenthuler, S. (2019 )Two monologues do not make a dialogue. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/two-monologues-do-make-dialogue- sarah-rozenthuler Stanfrod Medicine. (nd) The Belonging Project at Stanford. https://med.stanford.edu/psychiatry/special-initiatives/belonging.html Tapstock, D. (2013) Don Tapscott Trent University Chancellor Installation Speech. http://dontapscott.com/2013/06/don-tapscott- chancellor-installation-speech/ Tardini, S. and Cantoni, L. (2005) A semiotic approach to online communities: belonging, interest and identity in websites and videogames communities. IADIS International Conference. https://ssl.lu.usi.ch/entityws/Allegati/pdf_pub2044.pdf Tsatsou, P. (2009) ‘Reconceptualising ‘Time’ and ‘Space’ in the Era of Electronic Media and Communications’. Journal of Media and Communication Vol.1, pp 11-32. https://lra.le.ac.uk/bitstream/2381/31479/4/PlatformVol1_Tsatsou.pdf

Editor's Notes

  • Image source: https://pixabay.com/vectors/city-village-digital-home-town-1252643/
  • http://sites.utoronto.ca/qol/qol_model.htm
  • http://sites.utoronto.ca/qol/qol_model.htm
  • http://sites.utoronto.ca/qol/qol_model.htm
  • http://sites.utoronto.ca/qol/projects/adolescents.htm
  • https://tactilelearning.wordpress.com/2020/01/04/identity-and-the-d3bsc-model-a-briefing/
    https://tactilelearning.wordpress.com/2019/03/23/doing-being-becoming-belonging-connecting-twalk-spacetwalkleeds/
  • Tardini, S. and Cantoni, L. (2005) A semiotic approach to online communities: belonging, interest and identity in websites and videogames communities. IADIS International Conference. https://ssl.lu.usi.ch/entityws/Allegati/pdf_pub2044.pdf
  • alienation
  • https://med.stanford.edu/psychiatry/special-initiatives/belonging.html
  • https://www.ted.com/speakers/brene_brown
  • Tsatsou, P. (2009) ‘Reconceptualising ‘Time’ and ‘Space’ in the Era of Electronic Media and Communications’. Journal of Media and Communication Vol.1, pp 11-32. https://lra.le.ac.uk/bitstream/2381/31479/4/PlatformVol1_Tsatsou.pdf
  • Rozenthuler, S. 2019 Two monologues do not make a dialogue
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/two-monologues-do-make-dialogue-sarah-rozenthuler
  • Kemp, S. (2014) Social Brands Ebook. We are Social. http://wearesocial.sg/blog/2014/04/social-brands-ebook-2/
  • https://sylviamartinez.com/engagement-is-not-a-goal-its-an-outcome/
  • Infographic created using Piktochart to capture the students comments after a LSP session.
    https://create.piktochart.com/output/33795795-settling-in-at-university
  • https://socialmediaforlearning.com/2019/02/02/student-guest-post-8-ways-students-and-staff-can-engage-in-remote-collaboration/
    https://socialmediaforlearning.com/2018/03/04/guest-post-keep-calm-and-carry-on-learning-by-students-corran_shu-abbybutler96-matty_trueman-callum_rooney95/

    Tweet by @ACHIEVE_Hallam: https://twitter.com/ACHIEVE_Hallam/status/970994129705500673 Tweet by Simon Horrocks: https://twitter.com/horrocks_simon/status/943067775932796928
  • https://socialmediaforlearning.com/2020/03/22/guest-post-a-student-toolkit-to-help-you-tackle-remote-learning-written-by-students-for-students/
  • https://socialmediaforlearning.com/2020/03/31/guest-post-2-a-remote-learning-guide-written-by-students-for-students-how-to-ensure-your-remote-learning-experience-is-effective-supportive-and-fun-shusmash/
  • https://twitter.com/GretaThunberg/status/1041369960436703232?s=20

    https://twitter.com/AJEnglish/status/1166323391948886016?s=20
  • https://twitter.com/StephenDrew72/status/1166651328615129090?s=20
    https://twitter.com/KalwantBhopal/status/1091645917244080128
  • http://lornamcampbell.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Starting-CMALT-Advice-from-the-community.pdf
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contrasting_and_categorization_of_emotions

  • https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2019/07/03/scientistswhoselfie-how-sharing-selfies-can-build-trust-in-science
  • https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2019/07/03/scientistswhoselfie-how-sharing-selfies-can-build-trust-in-science
  • https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2019/07/03/scientistswhoselfie-how-sharing-selfies-can-build-trust-in-science
  • https://suzannessnapchat.wordpress.com/

    https://youtu.be/bGHR0lKgWpQ
  • https://suzannessnapchat.wordpress.com/

    https://youtu.be/bGHR0lKgWpQ
  • http://lornamcampbell.org/university-of-edinburgh/professional-blogging-acknowledging-social-media-harassment/

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