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Developing a PLN and open co-learning opportunities #UoRsocialmedia

Developing your academic online presence with social media
 
Workshop at the University of Reading led by Sue Beckingham SFHEA, Senior Lecturer in Information Systems and LEAD Associate at Sheffield Hallam University, this workshop will provide an opportunity to learn about new approaches and practical examples of using social media in higher education; and as co-learners share examples of effective practice and consider how these might be applied in your own contexts. The session will also provide participants some time and space to network and potentially make new connections.
 
The workshop aims to provide participants with an opportunity to:
Gain a better understanding of how social media can be used in a scholarly context
Appreciate the value of developing a rich professional online presence
Learn about opportunities for social and open informal learning through social media
Appreciate five elements of ‘working out loud’ (Stepper 2015) and how these can be of value to both yourself and others
 
Using the 5C Framework (Nerantzi and Beckingham 2014, 2015) as a lens we will consider how social media can be used to connect, communicate, curate, collaborate and create. In doing so consider the value of:
Developing a digital professional persona to share scholarly achievements
Cultivating your own personal learning network and co-learning communities
Sharing learning journeys through working out loud
 
 
Programme
Tuesday 26 April 2016
10.45-11.00 Networking and registration
11.00-12.30 Becoming a Digital Scholar using social media
12.30-13.15 Lunch
13.15 -14.30 Developing a PLN and open co-learning opportunities

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Developing a PLN and open co-learning opportunities #UoRsocialmedia

  1. 1. Developing a personal learning network and open co-learning opportunities Invited Speaker at the University of Reading Sue Beckingham @suebecks
  2. 2. "If learning is measured by a desire to learn more; to continue learning, then the focus has to be on creating the conditions for that to happen." Richardson 2015
  3. 3. Leveraging the new learning ecosystem https://twitter.com/degreed/status/694276812973678592
  4. 4. It's true that online learners will not have the same types of interactions as their on-campus peers. However, we need to stop thinking about what's "missing" or "lacking" and focus on what we can do to increase connection and build community via digital channels." Eric Stoller
  5. 5. Private (defined recipients) Public/open Via University systems Via branded platforms Intermittent Always on Formal tone Informal tone Adapted from Curran and Horrocks 2015 Traditional University Communications Social Media A new environment for engagement
  6. 6. Crowd Learning Involves harnessing the knowledge and expertise of many people in order to answer questions or address immediate problems. Sharples et al 2013 - Innovating Pedagogy Report
  7. 7. 1. WHO could you connect with? 2. WHAT would you gain from making new connections? 3. WHERE could you make new connections? 4. WHEN could you make new connections? 5. WHY would you make new connections? 6. HOW could new connections benefit your career?
  8. 8. Your network(s) YOU peers employers professionals experts professional bodies tutors friends
  9. 9. Three important networks OPERATIONAL NETWORK DEVLOPMENTAL NETWORK STRATEGIC NETWORK Purpose Getting work done efficiently; maintaining the capacities and functions required of the group. Enhancing personal and professional development; providing referrals to useful information and contacts, Figuring out future priorities and challenges; getting stakeholder support fro them, Location and temporal orientation Connections are mostly internal and orientated towards current demands Connections are mostly external and orientated toward current interests and potential future interests. Connections are internal and external and orientated towards the future. Players and recruitment Key connections are relatively nondiscretionary; they are prescribed mostly by the task and organisation structure, so it is very clear who is relevant Key connections are mostly discretionary; it is not always clear who is relevant. Key connections follow from the strategic context and the organisational environment , but specific membership is discretionary; it is not always clear who is relevant Network attributes and key behaviours Depth: building strong working relationships Breadth: reaching out to contacts who can make referrals and introductions. Leverage: creating inside- outside links. Harvard Business Review 2011
  10. 10. Image source: Noah Sussman 3 1 2 Building a valuable network
  11. 11. Weak Ties Strong Ties YOU Strong Ties Friends or Peers are less likely to be able to provide new information or connections Weak Ties May be able to introduce you to new people with potential company information and potential job offerings
  12. 12. Close connections Outer circle of connections Layer of opportunity Connections
  13. 13. Expand your network
  14. 14. Network The network aspect refers to the set of relationships, personal interactions, and connections among participants who have personal reasons to connect. It is viewed as a set of nodes and links with affordances for learning, such as information flows, helpful linkages, joint problem solving, and knowledge creation. Community The community aspect refers to the development of a shared identity around a topic or set of challenges. It represents a collective intention (however tacit and distributed) to steward a domain of knowledge and to sustain learning about it. Wenger et al 2011 Wenger et al 2011
  15. 15. COMMUNITIES community of PURPOSE community of CIRCUMSTANCE community of PRACTICE community of INTEREST Marathe 1999
  16. 16. MOTIVATIONS TO JOIN shared purpose shared circumstances shared practice shared interest to explore or express their passion to contribute to getting something done to connect with others in a similar life condition want to acquire or impart knowledge or skills
  17. 17. Communities of purpose formed by people who are trying to achieve a similar objective, who assist each other by sharing experiences, information, and peer-to-peer knowledge. Communities of practice formed by groups of people sharing a similar profession or vocation who seek to share experiences and facilitate professional exchange (which may also add value to offline networks) Communities of circumstance which are similar to communities of practice but are generally more personally focussed, or related to life experiences, and not driven by professional activities. Communities of interest linking people who share their ideas, passion, and knowledge in a common interest or theme, but might know very little about each other outside this shared interest. ONLINE COMMUNITIES (Rennie and Keppell 2010)
  18. 18. COMMUNITIES community of purpose community of circumstance community of practice community of interest e.g. a campaigning organisation committed to changing public policy e.g. an association of professionals e.g. a community of people with a particular medical condition e.g. a leisure or social activity #celcshooc conversations about end of life care #epccmooc enhancing prostate cancer care #XFactor @TheXFactor #RWC2015 @rugbyworldcup #LTHEchat learning and teaching in higher education chat @LTHEchat lthechat.com ALS Challenge Arab Spring and the uprising in the Middle East Natural disaster responses #HomeToVote and #LoveWins
  19. 19. @ahpshooc #celcshooc conversations about end of life care
  20. 20. 8 key steps to building a personal learning network 1. explore 2. search 3. follow 4. tune 8. respond 7. inquire 6. engage 5. feed Rheingold 2011
  21. 21. 5Cs Nerantzi and Beckingham 2014
  22. 22. Making Connections for example at a conference Twitter • Check the speaker list and follow • Either add to an existing list or create a new group • Reach out and interact 1 LinkedIn • Send invite to connect with a personal message • Receive updates on activities • Share own activities 2 Blogs, SlideShare and other spaces • Follow and connect as appropriate • Sign up for email alerts 3
  23. 23. Building your network Now @EdTechNeil
  24. 24. #ScholarSunday 'recommend an educator to follow' like #FF or #followfriday @raulpacheco http://www.raulpacheco.org/2012/09/scholarsunday/
  25. 25. Make good use of your bio
  26. 26. 5Cs Nerantzi and Beckingham 2014
  27. 27. engage learn share Interaction and dialogue increases the opportunities for professional development Social Connectedness
  28. 28. • Adding images to tweets • Embed video clips into blogs • Add SlideShare presentations to your LinkedIn profile • Collect and share useful resources using Pinterest Communicate your work - the visual augments the written Over 16k views
  29. 29. 5Cs Nerantzi and Beckingham 2014
  30. 30. Twitter list YouTube playlist Pinterest board Storify Scoop.it page Paperli SlideShare collection Diigo bookmark collection Curating useful resources
  31. 31. 5Cs Nerantzi and Beckingham 2014
  32. 32. Collaborative writing Google apps Collaborative discussions written Twitter, Blogs, LinkedIn Groups, Slack, Trello, WhatsApp Collaborative discussions verbal Skype, FaceTime and Google Hangouts Collaborative spaces
  33. 33. 5Cs Nerantzi and Beckingham 2014
  34. 34. / Learning and Teaching in Higher Education - weekly chat Wednesday 8pm @LTHEchat #LTHEchat http://lthechat.com
  35. 35. https://byod4learning.wordpress.com/
  36. 36. Create and grow your personal learning network and communities
  37. 37. https://moz.com/followerwonk My Twitter community
  38. 38. The #SocMedHE15 community NodeXL map
  39. 39. Consider how many excellent resources are hidden away...
  40. 40. Open resources but how clear is the signage?
  41. 41. A sharing learning community provides signposts to conversations examples resources images video Q&As
  42. 42. To benefit from learning and working out loud we also need to progress from selective hearing to active listening
  43. 43. The Lurker to be in a hidden place : to wait in a secret or hidden place especially in order to do something wrong or harmful computers : to read messages written by other people on the Internet in a newsgroup, chat room, etc., without writing any messages yourself Vicariousness experiences or felt by watching, hearing about, or reading about someone else rather than by doing something yourself Is 'listening in' vicarious lurking???
  44. 44. Positive Silent Engagement (PSE) I would argue that positive silent engagement (PSE) is not only valuable, but an essential component of digital connectedness. We learn by listening. It is no different online
  45. 45. “Working Out Loud starts with making your work visible in such a way that it might help others. When you do that – when you work in a more open, connected way – you can build a purposeful network that makes you more effective and provides access to more opportunities.” John Stepper
  46. 46. 5 Elements of Working Out Loud Making your work visible1 Making work better 2 Leading with generosity3 Building a social network. 4 Making it all purposeful5 Stepper 2014
  47. 47. 1. Being purposeful 2. Building a social network 3. Leading with generosity 4. Making you and your work visible 5. Improving yourself and others https://www.702010forum.com/Posts/view/john-stepper-explains-the-concept-of-working-out-loud
  48. 48. Benefits of Working Out Loud Internal: enterprise social network • peer-to-peer recognition • improved internal communications • better working relationships • humanised work • higher productivity • increased innovation and collaboration External: professional social networks • build and extend professional networks • opens virtual doors • crowd source information • breaks down geographical barriers
  49. 49. Connect establish a connection with a person online, typically by following them on a social platform or subscribing to their updates. 10 types of contributions (Stepper 2014) 1
  50. 50. Show appreciation Recognition and appreciation are “universal gifts” that Dale Carnegie wrote about in How to Win Friends and Influence People. It could be a Like button or a public “thank you” or giving someone credit for their good work. 10 types of contributions (Stepper 2014) 2
  51. 51. Share learning Sharing interesting content and the work of others you admire are low-risk, low-cost contributions that can help others. Feedback on your contributions can further your own learning. 10 types of contributions (Stepper 2014) 3
  52. 52. Connect the dots Take something you found valuable and help spread it to other individuals or groups that might find it useful by @-mentioning it or sending it to them directly. 10 types of contributions (Stepper 2014) 4
  53. 53. Ask a question When done well, this takes more time. That might include showing how you tried to get the answer before asking, offering recognition and appreciation for help, and ensuring the answer is available in such a way that it can help others. 10 types of contributions (Stepper 2014) 5
  54. 54. Answer a question This helps the person asking and anyone else who benefits from your answer in the future. When you answer questions it also highlights your reputation as someone who is knowledgeable and helpful. 10 types of contributions (Stepper 2014) 6
  55. 55. Offer feedback Here you’re trying to build on the work someone else has done in a way that credits the person’s original work while also helping others. The gift is constructive feedback that advances the work, and your feedback may also include appreciation or a question. 10 types of contributions (Stepper 2014) 7
  56. 56. Share your experience Reflect on your work. What have you learned – from both failures and successes – that might help others? For example, this could be resources you find useful or techniques you’ve found effective. Frame it in a way it feels less like “Look at me!” and more like “I thought you might be interested in this.” 10 types of contributions (Stepper 2014) 8
  57. 57. Offer original ideas Beyond reflecting on what has been done, you can imagine what might be done in the future and frame that as a contribution. What opportunities do you see for improvement of some kind and what are your constructive ideas? Credit other people and build on their work wherever possible. 10 types of contributions (Stepper 2014) 9
  58. 58. Connect a purposeful group One of the most powerful contributions is connecting people who care about a particular topic and enabling them to work together on some positive change. It could be a working group that’s focused on a particular problem or a community of practice where members are interested in getting better individually and advancing the practice overall. 10 types of contributions (Stepper 2014) 10
  59. 59. Patience and perseverance https://twitter.com/Hewlett_Found/status/684118586554712064
  60. 60. Give yourself with others
  61. 61. Sue Beckingham | @suebecks Educational Developer and Senior Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University with a research interest in the use of social media in education. Blog: http://socialmediaforlearning.com/ LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/suebeckingham
  62. 62. Developing your academic online presence with social media Led by Sue Beckingham SFHEA, Senior Lecturer in Information Systems and LEAD Associate at Sheffield Hallam University, this workshop will provide an opportunity to learn about new approaches and practical examples of using social media in higher education; and as co-learners share examples of effective practice and consider how these might be applied in your own contexts. The session will also provide participants some time and space to network and potentially make new connections. The workshop aims to provide participants with an opportunity to: • Gain a better understanding of how social media can be used in a scholarly context • Appreciate the value of developing a rich professional online presence • Learn about opportunities for social and open informal learning through social media • Appreciate five elements of ‘working out loud’ (Stepper 2015) and how these can be of value to both yourself and others Using the 5C Framework (Nerantzi and Beckingham 2014, 2015) as a lens we will consider how social media can be used to connect, communicate, curate, collaborate and create. In doing so consider the value of: • Developing a digital professional persona to share scholarly achievements • Cultivating your own personal learning network and co-learning communities • Sharing learning journeys through working out loud Programme Tuesday 26 April 2016 10.45-11.00 Networking and registration 11.00-12.30 Becoming a Digital Scholar using social media 12.30-13.15 Lunch 13.15 -14.30 Developing a PLN and open co-learning opportunities

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