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How to get your résumé into the
right hands
Solid tips for Archaeologists that need
a job or want a new one
By:
William A....
Job hunting sucks
You may be
thinking that
your college
education and
years of
experience are
proof that you
can do the job
Think Again!!!!!
College education and
experience are not enough
Here’s how it’s done
Step 1: Identify a target area
•Where do you want to live?
•What’s the cost of living there?
•How much do you need to make?
Targeting a particular area will allow
you to focus your search and
networking efforts
If there’s nothing going down in your
target area…
expand your search or establish another target
area
Step 2: Identify the industry
players
•What companies/museums/universities/government
agencies/non-profits are in that are...
You need to know who and what you’re dealing with so
you can find a common link that will help you make a
memorable impres...
1. Create a LinkedIn profile
2. Search for companies/organizations on LinkedIn that hire
archaeologists in your target are...
Do research but don’t be a
creeper
You want to learn about the people that
you will work with in the future. This
stuff is...
Creepers will be
maligned and
professionally ruined in
a close-knit industry like
archaeology
Step 3: Establish meaningful
connections
Once you’ve identified a common interest,
contact some of the employees at the
or...
•Talk about previous projects
•Ask about stuff they’ve done
•Ask about additional reading or similar projects
•Be sincerel...
Step 4: Use the collected
information to find job leads
You’ve established contact. Now find out:
1. Does your contact kno...
Most importantly
Will they let you “name drop”?
This will give you a local “reference” of sorts
Companies don’t hire workers
They hire people.
They’ll hire people they know, like, or
think can help the company even if
...
Step 5: Seal the deal
Don’t waste time with an email or
applying to a job opening
Make sure to
• Explain how you can make or save
the organization money on their
upcoming project(s)
• Name drop (if possib...
This 5-step process will improve
your job search
You will be actively guiding your job
search and creating your own
position
An estimated 70% of jobs are found
in the “Hidden Job” market
The “hidden job” market is not
posted online or advertised
a...
Let’s Recap:
Step 1: Identify a target area
Step 2: Identify the industry players
Step 3: Establish meaningful
connections...
Wanna learn more about
archaeology job
searching?
Visit my website:
www.succinctresearch.com/blog
Figures attributions
• Photographs obtained
from open-source stock
on Wikimedia
Commons
• “Cash for Work” from
the Noun Pr...
Succinct Research
Learn what you never learned in
college
Articles, Courses, and eBooks for
cultural resource management, ...
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How to get your résumé into the right hands

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Solid tips for any archaeologist, cultural resource management professional, historic preservation specialist, or heritage conservation employee can land a job. This is the exact strategy I use to find work for myself and help other people get jobs. Here is a step-by-step method for landing jobs and creating work from the "hidden job market"

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How to get your résumé into the right hands

  1. 1. How to get your résumé into the right hands Solid tips for Archaeologists that need a job or want a new one By: William A. White, III Research Publications Director Succinct Research
  2. 2. Job hunting sucks
  3. 3. You may be thinking that your college education and years of experience are proof that you can do the job Think Again!!!!!
  4. 4. College education and experience are not enough
  5. 5. Here’s how it’s done
  6. 6. Step 1: Identify a target area •Where do you want to live? •What’s the cost of living there? •How much do you need to make?
  7. 7. Targeting a particular area will allow you to focus your search and networking efforts
  8. 8. If there’s nothing going down in your target area… expand your search or establish another target area
  9. 9. Step 2: Identify the industry players •What companies/museums/universities/government agencies/non-profits are in that area? •What projects have these organizations completed in the past? •What is the organization’s specialty/niche? •Who works for these organizations? •What are these employees’ specialties and research interests? •What colleges did these folks graduate from?
  10. 10. You need to know who and what you’re dealing with so you can find a common link that will help you make a memorable impression. You also need to find organizations that have work
  11. 11. 1. Create a LinkedIn profile 2. Search for companies/organizations on LinkedIn that hire archaeologists in your target area 3. Search for these company’s employees 4. Go online and search for these employees’ Twitter or Facebook pages. Find out about their interests and activities 5. Use Google Scholar and JSTOR to find their academic articles in order to learn about their interests and identify potential research collaborations 6. Get your contact’s email/work phone numbers from their company website Use the internet to your advantage
  12. 12. Do research but don’t be a creeper You want to learn about the people that you will work with in the future. This stuff is already on the internet so its public information. Don’t invade someone’s privacy by calling them at home or asking to friend them on their personal Facebook without permission
  13. 13. Creepers will be maligned and professionally ruined in a close-knit industry like archaeology
  14. 14. Step 3: Establish meaningful connections Once you’ve identified a common interest, contact some of the employees at the organizations you’re interested in
  15. 15. •Talk about previous projects •Ask about stuff they’ve done •Ask about additional reading or similar projects •Be sincerely interested in their work •DON’T ASK FOR A JOB RIGHT OFF THE BAT •You want to establish a cordial, professional relationship that might result in a job or reference someday Here’s How
  16. 16. Step 4: Use the collected information to find job leads You’ve established contact. Now find out: 1. Does your contact know of any job openings in their company/organization/agency? 2. Do they know of openings at any other organizations? 3. Do they know of any projects going down anywhere in your target area? 4. Are the jobs they know about at organizations they’d recommend you work for? 5. If the job isn’t at a reputable organization, which organizations does your contact think are reputable?
  17. 17. Most importantly Will they let you “name drop”? This will give you a local “reference” of sorts
  18. 18. Companies don’t hire workers They hire people. They’ll hire people they know, like, or think can help the company even if they don’t have a posted job opening
  19. 19. Step 5: Seal the deal
  20. 20. Don’t waste time with an email or applying to a job opening
  21. 21. Make sure to • Explain how you can make or save the organization money on their upcoming project(s) • Name drop (if possible) and tell the manager what you know about the local archaeology market • And, ASK FOR THE JOB! Don’t be coy. You need work and they need your skills.
  22. 22. This 5-step process will improve your job search
  23. 23. You will be actively guiding your job search and creating your own position
  24. 24. An estimated 70% of jobs are found in the “Hidden Job” market The “hidden job” market is not posted online or advertised anywhere. It’s the place where people “in-the- know” create jobs for themselves
  25. 25. Let’s Recap: Step 1: Identify a target area Step 2: Identify the industry players Step 3: Establish meaningful connections Step 4: Use your collected information Step 5: Seal the deal
  26. 26. Wanna learn more about archaeology job searching? Visit my website: www.succinctresearch.com/blog
  27. 27. Figures attributions • Photographs obtained from open-source stock on Wikimedia Commons • “Cash for Work” from the Noun Project • “City” Rémy Médard, from the Noun Project • “City” inna bolenkey, from the Noun Project
  28. 28. Succinct Research Learn what you never learned in college Articles, Courses, and eBooks for cultural resource management, historic preservation, and heritage conservation professionals www.succinctresearch.com

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