Social media and medicine

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I'm giving this presentation at the American Society for Radiation Oncology today.

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  • Great slide deck Matt. Tried to download it but it is disabled. If you email me the deck I will make notes on each slide for you. I am a big proponent of 5 lines, 5 words per line max and try to edit it down from there. Much like Garr Reynolds Presentation Zen or Nancy Duarte's Slide:ology. Both books I would recommend to anyone who has to present more than once per year. Also if you select text and press ctrl+k you can make any image or text hyperlinked. A big plus here on slideshare for your fans. A little more work but worth it.
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  • Very nicely done presentation, Matt. I especially appreciated the slides showing the relationship between the component parts of medicine as a social science.
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Social media and medicine

  1. 1. Social Media and Medicine October 31, 2010 Matthew Katz, MD aka @subatomicdoc
  2. 2. Happy Halloween! Dana, Ben, Jake and Hayley Katz via amyvernon.tumblr.com
  3. 3. Disclosures • Financial: None • ASTRO: Incoming Chair of Communications • Intellectual: Founder, CaP Calculator website • My opinions are my own, not that of ASTRO or any organization
  4. 4. Social Media • What is it? – Background – Classification • Reasons to Participate – Logical – Practical • Social Media and Cancer Care – Education/Research/Patient Care • Barriers to Participation • Summary
  5. 5. What is Social Media? Differs from Traditional/Industrial Media: • Global reach • Means of production available to anyone at little/no cost • No specialized training require to create media • Content more rapidly updated online • Less permanent – your work can be changed/improved from the original Source: Wikipedia, 10/2/2010
  6. 6. What has changed in the last ten years? Web 1.0 Web 2.0 Information Participation Consumer Spectrum One Way Interactive Static Dynamic Published Published & User-Generated
  7. 7. Precursors to Social Media • Bulletin Boards / forums • Amazon.com  product review from readers • Ebay  do-it-yourself community of buyers/ sellers
  8. 8. Types of Social Media Type Example Purpose Comments Blog Huffington Post Communicate 122 M blogs Microblogging Twitter Communicate, market 27 M tweets/day Wiki Wikipedia Collaborate >2B articles on Wikipedia alone Content Sharing YouTube, Flickr Share, comment, market Flickr: 5B images YouTube: 2 B views/day Folksonomies Technorati, Del.icio.us Categorize Social Networks Facebook Facebook: 500 M users
  9. 9. Societal Change via Social Tools • Costs of sharing information have plummeted • Permits loose formation of groups for – sharing – cooperating – social action • Online communities can be created based on interest, not geography or economics Here Comes Everybody, Clay Shirky (2009)
  10. 10. The New World 1.0
  11. 11. The New World 2.0
  12. 12. Social Networks in Medicine
  13. 13. Professional Society Networks
  14. 14. Why Participate in Social Media? • Maintain or create relationships • Succumb to social pressure from friends • Altruistic impulse • Prurient impulse • Creative impulse • Validation impulse • Affinity impulse Groundswell, Li & Bernoff (2008)
  15. 15. Medicine is a Social Science
  16. 16. Radiation Oncology is a Social Science
  17. 17. Practical Reasons to Participate • Professional – Medical training – Patient education – Reputation management – Recruiting • Clinical Care – Improve support network for patients – Enhance MD-patient communication – Improve quality and safety • Research – Collaboration / Crowdsourcing – Promote research findings • Society – Advocacy and public policy
  18. 18. So why get involved in social media? • Values and purpose of radiation oncology haven’t changed • Relieve suffering • Improve quality • Improve safety • But new strategies may be necessary to achieve our goals in cancer care • Technology should enhance direct patient care, not replace it
  19. 19. How do you want to participate?
  20. 20. Social Media in Radiation Oncology • Education • Career • Research • Patient Care • Public Policy
  21. 21. Education - Wikibook • Started 2004 • 1441 pages, 34 sections/chapters • 34 registered users • >90% of content by Brian Cook and Tomas Dvorak
  22. 22. Career • ASTRO Career Center • LinkedIn • sdn network • Facebook
  23. 23. Residency Programs and Employers: What are they saying about you? * 274 comments, >97K page views by 10/1/2010 * Longer string commenting on residency interview experiences
  24. 24. What about your reputation?
  25. 25. Research Collaboration • Website facilitating shared decision-making in clinically localized prostate cancer • Aggregates nomograms, other predictive tools • Collaboration with MGH, DFCI, BIDMC, UCSF, MSKCC, Cleveland Clinic • > 800 users globally • Online nomogram for breast recurrence +/- RT after lumpectomy • Similar format to Adjuvant! Online • Validated Katz et al, BJUI 2010 Sanghani et al, JCO 2010
  26. 26. Why not crowdsource clinical trials? • Why not wikify to improve clinical trial accrual? – Community clinicians • Advocates for enrollment – E-Patients • Can make it easier to understand, more organized – Allied Health Professionals • Improve quality through multidisciplinary views – Industry • Funding/collaboration opportunities – Public Policy • Ensure legal/regulatory compliance to current standards
  27. 27. Share your research findings • Social Networks • Blogs • Microblogging Know your audience!
  28. 28. Patient Care • Forums • Social Networks • Blogs
  29. 29. Society - Public Policy
  30. 30. Don’t let them get it wrong
  31. 31. When you share and care about others…
  32. 32. Barriers to Participation Logistic • Lack of Familiarity • Time • Financial Cost Risks • Reputation (personal or organizational) • Balancing privacy and transparency • Malpractice liability
  33. 33. These too shall pass • Mayo Clinic has established a Center for Social Media • Other healthcare organizations and providers are also learning to navigate in social media • It’s a matter of how social media becomes part of medicine, not if it will
  34. 34. Where to Start: Person or Organization POST Approach: • People: what are people ready for • Objectives: what are your objectives? • Strategy: How to you want to change your relationships? • Technology: What social media tools help you achieve your strategic goals? Groundswell, Li & Bernoff (2008)
  35. 35. What are your needs?
  36. 36. Resources - Guidelines • http://socialmediagovernance.com/policies.p hp?f=4 • http://www.cdc.gov/healthcommunication/T oolsTemplates/socialmediatoolkit_BM.pdf • www.osma.org/socialmediapolicy/ • http://www.foxepractice.com/healthcare- social-media-policy
  37. 37. Summary • Social media is rapidly changing relationships in medicine whether you like it or not • Like medicine, social media is an art to practice, not master • It’s not what you know, but how you share it that determines value in both social media and medicine
  38. 38. Acknowledgements Radiation Oncology • Anthony Zietman • Phillip Devlin • Beth Bukata, Katherine Bennett • ASTRO Social Media • Diggers • #hcsm #md_chat #hpm #billofrights and other tweeps on Twitter

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