Strategic Teaching framework
Reflection1) What are 3 teachingtechniques/strategiesthat you or someone you knowuse(s) in theclassroom?1.2.3.2) What teac...
Objectiveso Introduction to learning style model: the Strategic Teachingframeworko The effective use of research based tea...
WHAT IS A STRATEGY? WHY DO WE NEEDSTRATEGIES IN THE CLASSROOM?Research Observations:(Learning, 2005) • Classrooms in whic...
continueThe research findings that were summarizedmake it clear that the ‘teach, test, and hope for thebest’ approach is n...
What Is Strategic Teaching?Strategic Teaching IS: best practices designed to increase studentachievement in ALL content c...
5 Components of a Strategic Lesson1. One or more daily outcome(s) based on state standards2. Two everyday instructional pr...
Strategic Teaching Defined…o Strategic teaching is the process of using a variety ofliteracy strategies. It maximizes the...
Why is Strategic Teaching Necessary?• The student performance drops off in the middleschool and high school years (Interna...
It benefits ALL of our students.Struggling ReadersStriving ReadersExpandingReaders
The Strategic Teacher The strategic teacher plans lessons with the outcome inmind. The outcomes of strategic lessons move...
Connection to ComprehensionThe following six strategies appear to have a firm scientificbasis for improving text comprehen...
Before Reading Strategies• activate background knowledge• establish a purpose for reading• generate questions• make predic...
During Reading Strategies engage with the text use cognitive process verify and reformulate predictions integrate new ...
After Reading Strategies• reflect on what they read• evaluate predictions• examine questions that guided reading• respond ...
Strategic Teaching Involves Purposeful Planning- Make before, during, and afterliteracy connections by choosing strategie...
Strategic Teaching Should Include…The Five Literacys in Every LessonReadingWritingTalkingListeningInvestigating
Strategic Lesson ExampleTopic: Survival Course of StudyObjectives: N/ALesson Objectives: touse comprehensionskillsBefore R...
Wonder, Notice, Prior Knowledge, orSpark cardoGrand Conversations StrategyGrand conversations are discussions held by the ...
Wonder, Notice, Prior Knowledge, orSpark cardProcedure:1. Hand out the think aloud cards to students anda reading passage ...
W – “I Wonder” card- use when you have aquestion about what is being read or “wonder”about the information.N – “I Notice” ...
3. As each student uses a card, the card is turnedover. All students must use their cards before startingover.4. When all ...
N SWPWonder, Notice, Prior Knowledge, orSpark card
Venn Diagram
Literacy Strategies to Promote Students EngagementQuick WritePurposes: (1) introduce a concept and connect this concept wi...
Exit SlipsPurpose: (1) reflect on content of lessonThe exit-slip strategy requires students to write responses to question...
Say SomethingPurposes: (1) make connections with texts during reading and (2)enhance comprehension of written material thr...
Purposes: (1) activate prior knowledge about a major topic and (2) allowstudents to build background knowledge about a top...
Literacy Strategies to Promote Students EngagementCarousel BrainstormPurposes: This strategy can fit almost any purpose de...
Literacy Strategies to Promote Students EngagementAnticipation GuidePurposes: (1) set purposes for reading texts, (2) acti...
Literacy Strategies to Promote Students EngagementFive Word PredictionPurposes: (1) encourage students to make predictions...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

English strategic teaching

579 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
579
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
46
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Sample lesson plan and activity for today.
  • To make all of this happen smoothly, these ideas must become part of a philosopy, a way of thinking about student learning.
  • To make all of this happen smoothly, these ideas must become part of a philosopy, a way of thinking about student learning.
  • To make all of this happen smoothly, these ideas must become part of a philosopy, a way of thinking about student learning.
  • To make all of this happen smoothly, these ideas must become part of a philosopy, a way of thinking about student learning.
  • To make all of this happen smoothly, these ideas must become part of a philosopy, a way of thinking about student learning.
  • To make all of this happen smoothly, these ideas must become part of a philosopy, a way of thinking about student learning.
  • To make all of this happen smoothly, these ideas must become part of a philosopy, a way of thinking about student learning.
  • English strategic teaching

    1. 1. Strategic Teaching framework
    2. 2. Reflection1) What are 3 teachingtechniques/strategiesthat you or someone you knowuse(s) in theclassroom?1.2.3.2) What teaching strategy do youuse most often?_____________________Explain:3) What are three factors shouldteachers consider when decidingwhat strategy to use?Justify each response— explainWHY.1.2.3.4) What might happen if teachersexpanded the number of teachingstrategies that they used in theirclassrooms?
    3. 3. Objectiveso Introduction to learning style model: the Strategic Teachingframeworko The effective use of research based teaching strategies can‐raise achievement, increase motivation, and help studentsdevelop the skills that they need to succeed on stateassessment tests and in the world outside of the classroom.o Class planning using Strategic Teaching methods.
    4. 4. WHAT IS A STRATEGY? WHY DO WE NEEDSTRATEGIES IN THE CLASSROOM?Research Observations:(Learning, 2005) • Classrooms in which students were either writing or usingrubrics: 0 % • Classrooms in which there was evidence of higher order‐thinking: 3% • Classrooms in which high yield strategies were being used:‐0.2% • Classrooms in which there was evidence of a clear learningobjective: 4 % • Classrooms in which fewer than one half of students were‐paying attention: 85 % • Classrooms in which students were using worksheets (a badsign): 52% • Classrooms in which non instructional activities were occurring:‐35%
    5. 5. continueThe research findings that were summarizedmake it clear that the ‘teach, test, and hope for thebest’ approach is not working. In order to fix theproblems that plague our classrooms, teachersneed strategies—strategies that they can use topromote higher order thinking, spark student‐interest, clarify learning objectives, incorporatewriting and assessment tasks, and activelyinvolve students in the learning process.
    6. 6. What Is Strategic Teaching?Strategic Teaching IS: best practices designed to increase studentachievement in ALL content classes. for all students regardless of their readingabilities. part of every lesson, every day. based on scientific research about adolescentlearning.
    7. 7. 5 Components of a Strategic Lesson1. One or more daily outcome(s) based on state standards2. Two everyday instructional practices: chunking (breaking text,lectures, video, etc. into small, manageable pieces) and studentdiscussion of concepts3. Three parts to a purposeful lesson structure: using connectedBEFORE, DURING, and AFTER literacy strategies4. Four steps to explicit instruction:“I Do”, “We Do”, “Y’all Do”, and “You Do”5. Five components of active literacy: read, write, talk, listen, andinvestigate.
    8. 8. Strategic Teaching Defined…o Strategic teaching is the process of using a variety ofliteracy strategies. It maximizes the understanding and retention of contentmaterial. It incorporates before, during, and after reading strategies. It incorporates a variety of vocabulary development andwriting strategies. The strategies a teacher chooses will depend on thepurpose of the lesson and the nature of the material beingstudied.
    9. 9. Why is Strategic Teaching Necessary?• The student performance drops off in the middleschool and high school years (International ReadingAssociation and National Middle School Association, 2002).• Research has shown that many children who read atgrade level in grade 3 will not automatically becomeproficient comprehenders in later grades. Therefore,teachers must teach comprehension explicitly, beginning inthe primary grades and continuing through high school(RAND Reading Study Group, 2002).
    10. 10. It benefits ALL of our students.Struggling ReadersStriving ReadersExpandingReaders
    11. 11. The Strategic Teacher The strategic teacher plans lessons with the outcome inmind. The outcomes of strategic lessons move the studentstoward mastery of content standards. The strategic teacher plans and facilitates engaging lessons.Students in strategic classrooms have the opportunity totalk, listen, read, write, and investigate everyday whileactively involved in the learning process. The strategic teacher builds assessment into every lesson.The lesson contains elements that allow the teacher to knowwhich students have and have not met the statedoutcome(s).
    12. 12. Connection to ComprehensionThe following six strategies appear to have a firm scientificbasis for improving text comprehension. These findings arefrom Put Reading First: The Research Building Blocks forTeaching Children to Read, 2001. Monitoring comprehension Using graphic and semantic organizers Answering questions Generating questions Recognizing text structure SummarizingThe following strategies have received some support fromthe research. Making use of prior knowledge Using mental imagery
    13. 13. Before Reading Strategies• activate background knowledge• establish a purpose for reading• generate questions• make predictions about text• encounter new vocabulary• connect writing to reading
    14. 14. During Reading Strategies engage with the text use cognitive process verify and reformulate predictions integrate new information with prior knowledge self-monitor comprehension construct graphic organizers summarize text
    15. 15. After Reading Strategies• reflect on what they read• evaluate predictions• examine questions that guided reading• respond to text through discussion• respond to text through writing• retell or summarize
    16. 16. Strategic Teaching Involves Purposeful Planning- Make before, during, and afterliteracy connections by choosing strategies depending onthe purpose of the lesson, student’s needs, and the natureof the material being studied. Multiple Strategies - Incorporate strategies that supportvarious learning styles and preferences. Connected Strategies – Incorporate before, during, andafter reading strategies that include a variety of vocabularydevelopment and writing strategies. Explicit Instruction – Maximize the understanding andretention of content material through direct explanation,modeling, guided practice, and independent application. (Ido, we do, you do.)
    17. 17. Strategic Teaching Should Include…The Five Literacys in Every LessonReadingWritingTalkingListeningInvestigating
    18. 18. Strategic Lesson ExampleTopic: Survival Course of StudyObjectives: N/ALesson Objectives: touse comprehensionskillsBefore ReadingOutcome: activate priorknowledge and buildvocabulary.Strategy: Interview andresponseTeacher Activity:Teacher will model theinterview and responsestrategy .Student Activity:Students will interviewthree people with thequestion: What doessurvival mean to you?Write responses on notecard. Then turn note cardover and write astatement that includesinterviews as well aspersonal response.During ReadingOutcome: Students focuson skills needed as onereads.Strategy: GrandConversationsTeacher Activity:The teacher reads aloudarticle (Hiker Resorts toSelf-Amputation)encouraging students touse cards.Student Activity:Respond to the readingwithWonder, Notice, PriorKnowledge, or Spark card.After ReadingOutcome: To reflect onarticle and respond to thereading through writing.Strategy: Reflection CircleTeacher Activity:Model the use of thereflection circle graphicorganizer (Venn diagram)Student Activity:Respond to each phase ofthe circle about how thisman’s survival affectedhim, his family, hiscommunity, and otherhikers.
    19. 19. Wonder, Notice, Prior Knowledge, orSpark cardoGrand Conversations StrategyGrand conversations are discussions held by the entireclass community. This strategy allows for dialogue amongstudents that is student directed and each one has theopportunity to critique, debate and extend upon eachother’s ideas.oObjectives -To provide a skillful strategy to students thathelps them focus on comprehending and thinking as theyread. To develop deeper understanding.
    20. 20. Wonder, Notice, Prior Knowledge, orSpark cardProcedure:1. Hand out the think aloud cards to students anda reading passage such as an article, a text or anovel.2. The teacher or a fluent reader from the classreads aloud. As the reading takes place, thestudents are directed to use the cards as follows:
    21. 21. W – “I Wonder” card- use when you have aquestion about what is being read or “wonder”about the information.N – “I Notice” card – use when you noticesomething interesting about the text or pictures,any connections or incongruence’s.P – “Prior Knowledge” card – use when youhave any prior knowledge to share about thetopic.S – “Spark” card – use when someone else sayssomething that makes you think of something elserelated to the text. This can only be used during adiscussion.Wonder, Notice, Prior Knowledge, or Sparkcard
    22. 22. 3. As each student uses a card, the card is turnedover. All students must use their cards before startingover.4. When all students have used their cards, turn themback to front and start the process over.Wonder, Notice, Prior Knowledge, orSpark card
    23. 23. N SWPWonder, Notice, Prior Knowledge, orSpark card
    24. 24. Venn Diagram
    25. 25. Literacy Strategies to Promote Students EngagementQuick WritePurposes: (1) introduce a concept and connect this concept with priorknowledge or experiences and (2) allow students to discuss and learnfrom each otherProcedure:1. Introduce a single word or phrase to the class.2. Students copy the concept on index cards.3. Students are given two minutes to write whatever comes to theirminds relative to the concept. They may write freely using single words,phrases, sentences, etc.4. After time is called, students may volunteer to share their thoughtson the subject.
    26. 26. Exit SlipsPurpose: (1) reflect on content of lessonThe exit-slip strategy requires students to write responses to questionsyou pose at the end of class. Exit slips help students reflect on whatthey have learned and express what or how they are thinking about thenew information. Exit slips easily incorporate writing into your contentarea classroom and require students to think critically.(Fisher & Frey,2004)Literacy Strategies to Promote Students Engagement
    27. 27. Say SomethingPurposes: (1) make connections with texts during reading and (2)enhance comprehension of written material through short readingsand oral discussionsProcedure:1. Choose a text for the students to read and have them work inpairs.2. Designate a stopping point for reading.3. Have students read to the stopping point and then “say something”about the text to their partners.4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until they finish reading the text.Literacy Strategies to Promote Students Engagement
    28. 28. Purposes: (1) activate prior knowledge about a major topic and (2) allowstudents to build background knowledge about a topic through discussionwith other studentsProcedure:1. Present the topic of the brainstorm to the students.2. Students list all the letters of the alphabet down a sheet of paper,leaving room beside each letter to write out the rest of a word or phrase.3. Students work individually thinking of as many words as they can thatare associated with the topic and write the words beside the appropriateletters.4. After a few minutes, let the students pair up or work in small groups to fillin blank letters they have not yet completed.5. Allow students to share with the entire class possible terms for thedifferent letters of the alphabet.Literacy Strategies to Promote Students EngagementABC Brainstorm
    29. 29. Literacy Strategies to Promote Students EngagementCarousel BrainstormPurposes: This strategy can fit almost any purpose developedProcedure:1. Teacher determines what topics will be placed on chart paper.2. Chart paper is placed on walls around the room.3. Teacher places students into groups of four.4. Students begin at a designated chart.5. They read the prompt, discuss with group, and respond directly onthe chart.6. After an allotted amount of time, students rotate to next chart.7. Students read next prompt and previous recordings, and thenrecord any new discoveries or discussion points.8. Continue until each group has responded to each prompt.9. Teacher shares information from charts and conversations heardwhile responding.
    30. 30. Literacy Strategies to Promote Students EngagementAnticipation GuidePurposes: (1) set purposes for reading texts, (2) activate priorknowledge, and (3) help make connections with the textProcedure:1. Analyze material to be read. Select major ideas with whichstudents will interact.2. Write the ideas in short, clear declarative statements with some ofthe statements being true and some of the statements being false.3. Put statements in a format that will elicit anticipation andprediction.4. Discuss students’ anticipations and predictions before they readthe text.5. Students read the text to confirm or disconfirm their originalresponses. After reading, students revisit their predictions andmodify, if necessary
    31. 31. Literacy Strategies to Promote Students EngagementFive Word PredictionPurposes: (1) encourage students to make predictions about text, (2)activate prior knowledge, (3) set purposes for reading, and (4) introducenew vocabularyProcedure:1. Select five key vocabulary words from the text that students are about toread.2. List the words in order on the chalkboard.3. Clarify the meaning of any unfamiliar words.4. Ask students to write a paragraph predicting the theme of the lesson usingall of the words in the paragraph.5. Allow volunteers to share their predictions.6. After completing the lesson, ask the students to use the same words towrite a summary paragraph.

    ×