21st century skills_english_map

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21st century skills_english_map

  1. 1. The Partnership advocates for the integration of 21st Century Skills into K-12education so that students can advance their learning in core academic subjects.The Partnership has forged alliances with key national organizations that represent the core academic subjects, including SocialStudies, English, Math, Science and Geography.As a result of these collaborations, the Partnership has developed this map toillustrate the intersection between 21st Century Skills and English.The maps will enable educators, administrators and policymakersto gain concrete examples of how 21st Century Skills can be integrated into core subjects.This 21st Century Skills Mapis the result of hundreds ofhours of research, developmentand feedback from educatorsand business leaders acrossthe nation.The Partnershiphas issued this map forthe core subject of English.This tool is available atwww.21stcenturyskills.org.An example from the English 21st Century SkillsMap illustrates sample outcomes for teachingCritical Thinking and Problem Solving.C Interdisciplinary ThemeSample StudentOutcome/Examples21st Century Skills MapDesigned in cooperation with the National Council of Teachers of English177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 21st CenturySkillsSkill DefinitionABD
  2. 2. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 Creativity and InnovationLEARNING INNOVATION SKILLSoutcome: Demonstrate originality andinventiveness in work.EXAMPLE: After reading several tricksterfolktales, such as Coyote Stories or High Johntales, and viewing two or three cartoons,students write their own contemporary versionof a trickster story and present them as stop-motion or claymation films.EXAMPLE: Students collect a variety ofnewspaper and magazine articles on a socialor environmental issue. In small groups, theydecide on an issue and a theme and style for apoem.They use words and phrases cut from thearticles to create a “found poem” on their topic.outcome: Communicate new ideasto others.EXAMPLE: Students select several photographsor pictures found on the internet that representtheir individual personalities.They each write anautobiographical poem or series of poems and,using presentation software, make a slideshowof the pictures and poems that may includeappropriate background music.As a class,students discuss how the pictures and musicchange their understanding of the poem.outcome: Demonstrate originality andinventiveness in work.EXAMPLE: As the culmination of a unit offantasy or investigative journalism reading,students write fanfic (stories set in the worlds ofthe books they read). Each story will introduce acontemporary realistic concern or issue, such aswater shortage, vigilantism, or genetic engineering.Students may publish these works on the schoolwebsite or on fanfic sites approved by theteacher.EXAMPLE: Using the poem “Where I’m From”by George Ella Lyons and portions of thecontemporary song of that same title by DigablePlanets, students write poems based on theirown backgrounds. Students make web pages ofthe poem, hyperlinking key words in the poemto photographs, illustrations, explanations, orother texts that enhance or explain the meaning.Students select three of their classmates’websites to link to on their site. Each link has abrief review of the page explaining why it waslinked to.outcome: Be open and responsive to newand diverse perspectives.EXAMPLE: Working in groups, students selectconcepts such as prosperity, justice, integrity,peace, or security. Each student in the groupcontributes one image to an online slideshow,such as ed.voicethread.com, that illustrates theconcept or that show the absence of the quality.outcome: Develop and communicate newideas to others.EXAMPLE: After reading a dystopian novel suchas The Giver, The Lord of the Flies, The Handmaid’sTale, or Fahrenheit 451, students will create amovie trailer that highlights universal questionsraised by the novel. Students will view eachothers’ trailers, write up notes critiquing them,and present their feedback in a “Siskel and Ebert”remake.outcome: Demonstrate originality andinventiveness in work.EXAMPLE: Each student records a dramaticreading of a meaningful poem using appropriateinflection and expression.The meaning of thepoem is enhanced with selection of appropriatemusic and video or still images.The student alsorecords a commentary discussing the intentionsof the work and a rationale for the creativedecisions.outcome: Act on creative ideas to make atangible and useful contribution to the domain inwhich the innovation occurs.EXAMPLE: Working in teams, students researcha global social issue, develop a problem scenario,and create an online game to teach youngerstudents about this issue. For an example, seeHurricane Katrina:Tempest in Crescent Citywww.tempestincrescentcity.org.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade• Demonstrating originalityand inventiveness in work• Developing, implementingand communicating newideas to others• Being open andresponsive to new anddiverse perspectives• Acting on creative ideasto make a tangible anduseful contribution tothe domain in which theinnovation occurs
  3. 3. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 Creativity and Innovation (continued)LEARNING INNOVATION SKILLSoutcome: Develop, implement andcommunicate new ideas to others.EXAMPLE: Using an open-ended inspiration forwriting such as Chris Van Allsburg’s Mysteries ofHarris Burdick, each student writes the beginningof a story and records it as a podcast. Studentsin other classes listen to the story, create theensuing episodes, and record them as podcasts,until a final group writes and records theconclusions.Group members and other classmates addaudio or written responses commenting on thesignificance of the image to the concept.outcome: Develop and communicate newideas to others.EXAMPLE: Students write an audio commercialfor a favorite short story using the conventionsof movie trailers.They also add appropriate soundeffects and background music. (Example movietrailers can be found at www.apple.com/trailers).EXAMPLE: Students read works of digitalfiction at http://wetellstories.co.uk. Students useone of the pieces as inspiration for a short workof their own.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  4. 4. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 Critical Thinking Problem SolvingLEARNING INNOVATION SKILLS• Exercising soundreasoning inunderstanding• Making complex choicesand decisions• Understanding theinterconnections amongsystems• Identifying and askingsignificant questions thatclarify various points ofview and lead to bettersolutions• Framing, analyzing andsynthesizing informationin order to solve problemsand answer questionsoutcome: Identify and ask significantquestions that clarify various points of view.EXAMPLE: Students participate in literaturecircle discussions of a short story they readand for which they prepared an open-endeddiscussion question.They use a voice recorderto record their discussion.They then listento the recording, evaluating the effectivenessof points raised in response to the questions,insights shared, and balance of participation.The recording may be published as a podcast.outcome: Frame, analyze and synthesizeinformation in order to solve problems andanswer questions.EXAMPLE: After reviewingprofiles at an entrepreneurialmicrofinancing site such aswww.kiva.org, students researchthe economic and social impactof several proposals. Each student selects oneproposal and writes an essay to persuadeclassmates to choose this proposal.The classcreates an appropriate activity to raise themoney to support the chosen proposal.EXAMPLE: Using picture books andshort nonfiction selected by the teacher,students will examine social injusticespresent in our society and multipleways in which individuals take socialaction.Throughout the unit, studentskeep a reflective journal of the injusticespeople faced and the actions that overcame oroutcome: Frame, analyze and synthesizeinformation in order to solve problems andanswer questions.EXAMPLE: After writing an informative orpersuasive piece, the student creates a “wordcloud” of the writing using a tool such aswordle.com which represents the frequency ofword use: the more frequent the word, the largerit is displayed. Students read their selection aloudwith the word cloud projected on a screen. Ingroups, students analyze the visual representationand evaluate the match between the prominentwords and the intention of the writer.outcome: Make complexchoices and decisions.EXAMPLE: Students conductresearch to answer the question: How muchschooling do you need to get the kind of job youwould like to have? After researching salaries,employment outlook, and education/trainingrequirements of a variety of possible careers,students create a chart comparing their top threeto five choices and write short personal essaysexplaining how these choices fit their goals.outcome: Frame, analyze and synthesizeinformation in order to solve problems andanswer questions.EXAMPLE: In small groups, students create aplan for involving students in making technologydecisions in the school.The process may includegathering student input from surveys, establishinga student advisory committee, using studentsto help provide tech support or other servicesto the school, evaluating cost/value ratios,and fundraising proposals to support theirrecommended strategies.These plans should beused in a presentation to the principal or theschool board.EXAMPLE: Students choose an article from thesatiric website www.theonion.com to analyze.In addition to identifying the elements of satire(exaggeration, incongruity, reversal, and parody)used in the article, students write a critiqueevaluating the effectiveness of the piece ascommentary on current events.outcome: Identify and ask significantquestions that clarify various points of view.EXAMPLE: Working in groups, students followthe Twitter logs of a variety of newspapers forseveral days. Students compare these logs forthe differences and similarities in the eventsposted and speculate on the significance, if any,of these comparisons.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  5. 5. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 Critical Thinking Problem Solving (continued)LEARNING INNOVATION SKILLSdiminished the injustice.As a class, studentsidentify injustices, big and small, in their ownworld and brainstorm ways a young personcould take action for change, even in a smallway. One resource for this is, How to Solve theSocial ProblemsYou Choose - And Turn CreativeThinking into Positive Action, by Barbara A. Lewis.outcome: Identify and ask significantquestions that clarify various points of view.EXAMPLE: At the end of a short story unit,students brainstorm elements of effective shortstories. Using a visual ranking tool (such as theIntel online visual ranking thinking tool), eachstudent considers the short stories read in theunit and ranks them, using the comment featureof the tool to add explanations.The comparisonfunction of the tool may be used to contrastratings between students. Students can thendiscuss the reasons for the differences in rankings.outcome: Exercise sound reasoning inunderstanding.EXAMPLE: Using an online visual search toolsuch as Many Eye’s Word Tree, or http://services.alphaworks.ibm.com/manyeyes/home, studentspaste in a piece of text such as a poem or speechthat contains rhetorical devices such as repetition.Select a word or phrase.All of the contexts forthe word or phrase will be displayed in a tree-likebranching. Use the visual as a basis for writing ananalysis of recurrent themes and variations in thepiece of text.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  6. 6. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 CommunicationLEARNING INNOVATION SKILLS• Articulating thoughtsand ideas clearly andeffectively throughspeaking and writingoutcome: Articulate thoughts clearly andeffectively through writing, speaking, and visuals.example: Each student chooses a classphotograph or creates a piece of artwork thatillustrates a favorite memory of the year.Thestudent writes a narrative of the memory.Theillustration and auditory recording of the essayare published on a secure educational site suchas ed.voicethread.com. Classmates can recordcomments responding to the essay or to theillustration.outcome: Articulate thoughts clearly andeffectively through writing and visuals.example: Using an online comic stripgenerator such as Pixton for School, studentscreate a graphic novel version of a short storyor novel.outcome: Articulate thoughts clearly andeffectively through writing and speaking.example: Students pose a question about alocal issue on a secure collaborative space suchas ed.voicethread.com orwritingmatters.org.Each student gives a short written or recordedresponse to the issue. Invite community leadersto add their responses.outcome: Articulate thoughts and ideasclearly and effectively.example: After viewing clips of CharlieChaplin movies, students discuss the conventionsof silent film such as brief captions andexaggerated facial expressions that communicatethe story.They then create a silent movieversion of a suspenseful short story such as anEdgar Allen Poe or Ray Bradbury story.example: Students brainstorm topics thatthey were worried about when they startedmiddle school/junior high school.They writea survival guide with tips on these topics.Thesurvival guide may be published as a booklet oras a series of podcasts or videos to be sharedwith incoming students. Students could celebratetheir collective accomplishments with a“publication party” to which parents and schoolleaders are invited.outcome: Articulate thoughts and ideasclearly and effectively through writing.example: Students post short writings aboutclass activities in a class journal or on a secureclass bulletin board or wiki. Classmates ask andanswer questions, clarify information, or shareinsights in their postings.outcome: Articulate thoughts clearlyand effectively through writing, speaking, andmultimedia.example: As a culminating event after apoetry unit, students sponsor a coffeehousenight or a poetry slam.Themes or elementsfrom each poem may be amplified withappropriate visuals or music.outcome: Articulate thoughts clearly andeffectively through writing.example: Students follow a variety of blogswritten on topics of personal interest, postingtheir own comments as appropriate.Afterfollowing these blogs for a period of time,students write a reflection on their onlineexperience, how they found the blogs theywere following, the differences in tone, content,and expertise between these blogs, the insightsgained from these blogs, and their own role inthe community.example: Students translate a piece of dialogfrom a Shakespearean play into a text messageexchange and analyze the effect of the writingmode on the tone or meaning of the dialogue.Students then discuss audience and purpose inrelation to communication media.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  7. 7. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 CollaborationLEARNING INNOVATION SKILLS• Demonstrating theability to work effectivelywith diverse teams• Exercising flexibility andwillingness to behelpful in makingnecessary compromisesto accomplish acommon goal• Assuming sharedresponsibility forcollaborative workoutcome: Demonstrate the ability to workeffectively with diverse teams.example: Through a reputable programsuch as epals, the class is connected to a classin another country.With teacher supervision,students exchange emails and digital photos ofa specific geographic or architectural treasurein or near their community. Students usethis information to create picture books forchildren in a classroom in a third communityunrelated to the first two classes.outcome: Assume shared responsibility forcollaborative work.example: Pairs of students write, revise, andpublish a mystery short story using GoogleDocs or a class wiki. Each partner reviews thehistory and writes a short reflection on his orher role in completing the piece.example: Students collaborate on writingbook reviews in a class wiki or blog site such asblurb.com or www.writingmatters.org.At theend of the year, students use the reviews anddiscussions to select a Book of the Year.outcome: Assume shared responsibility forcollaborative work.example: Using a collaborative researchannotation tool such as Trailfire www.trailfire.com, Google Notebook or Diigo www.diigo.com, teams of students collect and comment onrelevant websites on a topic related to ahistorical fiction novel read by the group. Eachgroup collates the research findings in a groupwiki to make a nonfiction textbook that is acompanion to the novel.outcome: Exercise flexibility and willingnessto be helpful in making necessary compromises toaccomplish a common goal.example: As an interdisciplinary team project,students research a significant environmental issuesuch as water conservation, energy consumption,global warming, or deforestation.They then createa video that presents the information along withactions students can take regarding this problem.Students should select powerful visual imagesand an appropriate soundtrack to enhance theirmessage. In the video the team also reflects ontheir collaboration and compromises they made.outcome: Demonstrate ability to workeffectively with diverse teams.example: Students are paired in male-femalegroups to write a weekly summary of the classactivities to distribute to their parents.The writingis shared and delivered to both students’ parents.outcome: Exercise flexibility and willingnessto be helpful in making necessary compromises toaccomplish a common goal.example: In a virtual world such as TeenSecond Life, students working in teams designan amphitheater in which to conduct virtualworkshops on writing poetry and to host virtualpoetry readings.outcome: Assume shared responsibility forcollaborative work.example: As a team, students create a virtualfieldtrip for elementary students. In addition tocreating a video and narration detailing the site, theteam also includes background information fromresearch as well as interviews with appropriateexperts. Use a project management tool suchas www.teamness.com to organize the tasks,assignments, and deadlines.outcome: Demonstrate ability to workeffectively with diverse teams.example: Students collaborate with seniorcitizens in a digital storytelling workshop.Theteams bring to life a story from a senior’s historyas they collaborate on writing and creating thevideo, including recording the narration andselecting images and music.The finished videosare presented in a community film festival. Eachteam designs criteria for evaluating their video inadvance, and grades their work accordingly.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  8. 8. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 Information LiteracyINFORMATION, MEDIA TECHNOLOGY SKILLS• Accessing informationefficiently and effectively,evaluating informationcritically and competentlyand using informationaccurately and creativelyfor the issue or problemat hand• Possessing a fundamentalunderstanding of theethical/legal issuessurrounding the accessand use of informationoutcome: Access and criticallyevaluate information and useinformation accurately to solveproblems.example: Students research thecarbon footprint impact of “food miles” –– thedistance food travels between where it isproduced and where it is consumed. Using thisinformation, they calculate the food miles of atypical dinner for their families. Create a classgraph of the results. Investigate what locally-grown changes could be made to the menu.Write a letter to the editor sharing suggestionsfor reducing the number of “food miles” in thelocal community.outcome: Access and criticallyevaluate information and useinformation creatively.example: After researching atopic such as global warming, studentspresent information on their findings andrecommendations as spoken-word style poems.They present their poems to younger students,and/or create a multimedia project, which isposted in a blog in order to receive commentsfor feedback.outcome: Use informationaccurately and creatively for theissue or problem at hand.example: After completinga literature circle unit of teenproblem novels, students brainstorm a list ofsignificant social, emotional, or health issuesteens face today.Working in groups, studentsresearch one issue and create a public serviceannouncement on a closed Youtube channel(viewable only by students in the class) topersuade their peers about one action theyshould take regarding this issue.outcome: Use information accurately andcreatively to generate new knowledge.example: After gathering biographicalinformation from print and online sources as wellas autobiographical information from an author-sponsored website, students create a chartmatching biographical information with topics,settings, plots, characters, or other characteristicsof the author’s works that may have beeninfluenced by the author’s own life.outcome: Possess and share a fundamentalunderstanding of the ethical/legal issuessurrounding the access and use of information.example: Working in groups, using websitessuch as the International Ecotourism Society,students create a brochure or website topromote sustainable travel in their community.outcome: Use information accurately andcreatively for the issue or problem at hand.example: After researching classic children’sauthors, students write biographies as illustratedchildren’s books that include an appropriatebibliography of sources.The books can bepublished online at a website such as lulu.comor writingmatters.org and shared with localelementary students.example: Students create documentaries oflocal veterans. Students use print and internetresources to access background information toprepare for the interviews and to gather imagesto use in the video.As students review footageof the interviews, they select a quote thatclarifies the theme of the documentary. Studentsfollow all copyright, Fair Use, and CreativeCommons guidelines for images and music usedin the documentary.The documentaries could beaired on a local cable access channel.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  9. 9. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 Information Literacy (continued)INFORMATION, MEDIA TECHNOLOGY SKILLSoutcome: Evaluate information criticallyand competently.example: Students are given a teacher-generated list of websites that are a mixtureof legitimate and hoax sites. Students applya website evaluation framework such asRADCAB (www.radcab.com) to write anexplanation for deciding whether each site iscredible or not.outcome: Evaluate information criticallyand competently and use informationaccurately and creatively for the problem athand.example: Students identify historicinformation from story elements in books,such as The Time Warp Trio.outcome: Access information efficientlyand effectively, evaluate information criticallyand competently and use informationaccurately and creatively.example: Students research a notablehistoric figure to create a multi-genreresearch project that includes a mockinterview, a timeline, a piece of creativewriting, and a digital product.outcome: Evaluate information criticallyand competently.example: After reading a historical fictionnovel, students work in groups to locate andevaluate websites that give relevant historicalbackground information.The group will usesocial bookmarking tools such as del.icio.us,2Collab, or Sitemark to compile likely websitesand to share notes about the usefulness andcredibility of information found at that site.Atthe end of their research, the group will share alist of the most relevant and credible sites withthe class.The presentation might be recorded asscreenshots of homepages and audio narrativein presentation software, or shared at a websitesuch as www.flowgram.com.outcome: Possess a fundamentalunderstanding of the ethical/legal issuessurrounding the access and use of information.example: Students create a online handbookin a wiki space explaining the copyright, FairUse, and Creative Commons guidelines theymust follow to include music, images, video, orexcerpt from a published text in a multimediaCD version of the school yearbook.The wikiwill include an FAQ section, online resources,specific examples, guidelines, etc. that can beeasily modified.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  10. 10. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 10Media LiteracyINFORMATION, MEDIA TECHNOLOGY SKILLS• Understanding howmedia messages areconstructed, for whatpurposes and using whichtools, characteristics andconventions• Examining how individualsinterpret messagesdifferently, how valuesand points of view areincluded or excluded andhow media can influencebeliefs and behaviors• Possessing a fundamentalunderstanding of theethical/legal issuessurrounding the accessand use of informationoutcome: Understand how mediamessages are constructed, for whatpurposes and using which characteristics andconventions.example: Cut the titles off a variety ofmagazines. Students analyze the images andwords to guess the magazine’s intendedaudience.They then guess what magazine it isand give their reasoning. Students could alsoidentify their own demographic and design anoriginal magazine that would attract them.outcome: Examine how values and pointsof view are included or excluded and howmedia can influence beliefs and behaviors.example: From a collection of a variety ofcomic books, students will work with a partnerto chart number of characters, the number ofmale vs. female characters, and the activity ofthe different characters. Students will discussthe various roles assigned to the characters,looking for patterns, surprises, and curiosities.outcome: Examine howvalues and points of view areincluded or excluded and howmedia can influence beliefs andbehaviors.example: Body image issues ofadolescent girls receive much attention, butadolescent boys also have their concerns.Students research issues of body image of eachgender and how the media influence perceptionsof body image. Using information from theresearch, groups of students create an originalvideo for an audience of 6th or 7th graders thatpromotes healthy attitudes toward body image.outcome: Examine how individuals interpretmessages differently, how values and points ofview are included or excluded and how mediacan influence beliefs and behaviors.example: After a teacher-led discussion oftarget markets and consumerism, students collectexamples of print,TV, or internet advertisingtargeting teens that promote excessive andirresponsible consumption. Students discuss thehidden messages of these advertisements andvote on the one with the most negative message.Students then write letters or emails to thecompany explaining the students’ findings andasking for change in future advertisements.outcome: Understand how mediamessages are constructed, for what purposesand using which tools, characteristics andconventions.example: Social networking sites and user-created content have given advertisers newvenues and new tools to target their potentialmarket with more precision. Students keepa one-week log of encounters with brands,product placements, branded websites, viraladvertising, banner advertisements, as wellas traditional print, radio, and TV advertisingthat are directed toward the teen market,noting the brands and the type of advertisingencountered. Students pool the data as aclass. Using the compiled data, students writeanalytical essays drawing conclusions about theintention, ethics, effectiveness, or other topicinferred from the data.example: In addition to reviewing theAcademy Award for best foreign film, studentsresearch other international film awards. Insmall groups, they research, select, and previewan award-winning international film.The groupsconnect via email, a blog, social network, orvideoconferencing with students from the film’shome country to discuss reactions to the film.The students write a critique of the film thatincludes a recommendation whether or not toview the film as a whole class.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  11. 11. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 11ICT LiteracyINFORMATION, MEDIA TECHNOLOGY SKILLS• Using digital technology,communication tools and/or networks appropriatelyto access, manage,integrate, evaluate, andcreate information inorder to function in aknowledge economy• Using technology asa tool to research,organize, evaluate andcommunicate information,and the possessionof a fundamentalunderstanding of theethical/legal issuessurrounding the accessand use of informationoutcome: Use technologyas a tool to research, organize,evaluate and communicateinformation.example: Students collaboratewith a classroom in a different geographicregion to research and share the impact of anational current event on local communities.They post findings and comments to ablog or wiki. Students may connect viavideoconferencing or internet communicationsoftware such as skype to share discoveries onsimilarities and differences between the twocommunities.outcome: Use digital technology andcommunication tools appropriately to access,evaluate, and create information.example: Students brainstorm informationthey would need to know to decide ifstudents in their school are as tech savvyas peers in other schools. Students examinearchives of the NetDay surveys of studenttechnology use (www.tomorrow.org) andselect several questions relevant to localtechnology concerns. Using a survey tool suchas surveymonkey.com, students collect localdata on the selected questions and comparethe results to the national averages. Studentsuse the comparisons to suggest to the principalchanges in classroom technology use or access.outcome: Use technology as a tool toresearch, organize, evaluate and communicateinformation, and possess a fundamentalunderstanding of the ethical/legal issuessurrounding the access and use of information.example: Using tools in Google Earth studentscreate a digital map of local authors that createsa mash-up integrating information such asauthor’s location, biographical information, literaryinformation, authoritative reviews of works,relevant images, and personal opinion. Studentswill follow all guidelines for Fair Use, CreativeCommons, and crediting sources for information,sound, and images.outcome: Use digital technology andcommunication tools appropriately to access,evaluate, and create information.example: Using a collaborative online toolsuch as Shelfari, and following guidelines of safeand responsible online behavior, students postreviews of books they’ve read, and they read,rate, and comment on reviews written by otherstudent readers.outcome: Demonstrate an understanding oflegal, ethical, and safe online behavior.example: Students conduct research, includingconducting surveys, about the prevalence, effects,and examples of cyberbullying. Students design aschool-wide campaign to raise awareness as wellas offering constructive suggestions for handlingthis problem.outcome: Use technology as a tool toresearch, organize, evaluate and communicateinformation, and possess a fundamentalunderstanding of the ethical/legal issuessurrounding the access and use of information.example: Students create a workshop forteens on safe participation in social networkingsites.The workshop should include interactiveactivities, skits, videos, or simulations on issuesof privacy, appropriateness, and reporting.outcome: Use technology as a tool tocommunicate information.example: Students write personal essaysmodeled on “This I Believe” essays broadcaston National Public Radio. Students record theiressays as podcasts. (Curriculum support materialis available at www.thisibelieve.org).outcome: Use digital technology,communication tools and/or networksappropriately to integrate, evaluate, and createinformation.example: Students participate invideoconferencing about books and reading withstudents from other schools as a Read Acrossthe Planet activity on Read Across AmericaDay. (Information can be found at www.twice.cc/read).4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  12. 12. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 12Flexibility AdaptabilityLIFE CAREER SKILLS• Adapting to varied rolesand responsibilities• Working effectively in aclimate of ambiguity andchanging prioritiesoutcome: Adapt to varied roles andresponsibilities.example: Students partner with a classmateto write a poem in two voices to depict twosides of an issue (i.e., a historic event, a currentevent, a science or social issue debate, or theprotagonist and antagonist from a class novel).outcome: Adapt to varied roles andresponsibilities.example: Students interact in an age-appropriate online environment that combineseducational activities with social networking. Ina site such as Whyville.net, students collaborateto solve learning games, and participate incommunity life by starting a business, writingfor the newspaper, or participating in thegovernment.They also build social relationshipswith participants from around the globe throughsupervised chat.outcome: Work effectively in a climate ofambiguity and changing priorities.example: In emulation of “movie in a day”competitions that are held across the country,students will work in teams to create acompleted video in a 24 hour period. Studentswill be given a genre for the script and severalrandom components that must be workedinto the script, the audio, or the visuals.Thesecomponents might be an object, a phrase, aname, a product, a sound effect, etc.The writing,filming, and editing are to be completed within a24 hour period.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  13. 13. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 13Initiative Self-DirectionLIFE CAREER SKILLS• Monitoring one’s ownunderstanding andlearning needs• Going beyond basicmastery of skills and/orcurriculum to exploreand expand one’s ownlearning and opportunitiesto gain expertise• Demonstrating initiativeto advance skill levelstowards a professionallevel• Defining, prioritizing andcompleting tasks withoutdirect oversight• Utilizing time efficientlyand managing workload• Demonstratingcommitment to learningas a lifelong processoutcome: Define, prioritize and completetasks without direct oversight.example: Students post regularly intheir own secure, school-approved blogs inresponse to teacher-initiated writing promptsor on self-selected topics.They commenton classmates blogs and, in turn, respond tofeedback provided through comments.outcome: Monitor one’s ownunderstanding and learning needs.example: Following each group project,students complete a self-evaluation.Theyreview these self-evaluations to monitor skillsover time.outcome: Utilize time efficiently and manageworkload.example: Each student creates a project ofpersonal interest that requires significant work incollecting and organizing information, in workingresponsibly in online environments, and increating a digital product to share with a specificaudience.The student will break the projectdown into smaller parts and create a schedule ofdeadlines. (Curriculum support material can befound at www.genyes.org).outcome: Monitor one’s own understandingand learning needs.example: As a class students create a rubricfor an individual multimedia writing project.Students use the rubric to self-assess their work,including comments reflecting on the quality oftheir work and their process.outcome: Go beyond basic mastery ofskills and/or curriculum to explore and expandone’s own learning and opportunities to gainexpertise.example: Each student will complete asenior capstone project that includes a paper,a product, a portfolio, and a presentation on aself-selected topic.outcome: Demonstrate commitment tolearning as a lifelong process.example: Using an online document sharingtool, the student creates an electronic portolioto showcase personal goals, projects, writing,multi-media productions, experiences, andreflections on progress and achievements.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  14. 14. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 14Social Cross-Cultural SkillsLIFE CAREER SKILLS• Working appropriatelyand productively withothers• Leveraging the collectiveintelligence of groupswhen appropriate• Bridging culturaldifferences and usingdiffering perspectives toincrease innovation andthe quality of workoutcome: Bridge culturaldifferences and use differingperspectives to increase innovationand the quality of work.example: Students communicate with peersaround the globe, or in communities they arenot familiar with where students representsignificantly different backgrounds from them,in a project such as “Rock Our World”, byinvestigating climatic, geographic, and culturalsimilarities and differences. Students alsocollaborate on movies, songs, stories, and invideoconferencing.outcome: Leverage the collectiveintelligence of groups whenappropriate.example: Students communicate viateacher-supervised email, videoconferencingor through secure collaborative websites (suchas think.org) with peers in other countriesor in communities they are not familiar withwhere students represent significantly differentbackgrounds from them, to compare thesignificance of a specific environmental issue ineach country or community. Students createand share documentary videos synthesizingwhat they have learned.outcome: Bridge cultural differences anduse differing perspectives to increase innovationand the quality of work.example: Students conductresearch about three or fourimmigrant communities living inor near their city or town since1965.The students then publishfindings on the Internet and comparetheir findings with students in other countriesthrough projects such as the InternationalCyberFair.example: Using a shared wiki, blog, orlearning management system, studentscommunicate with classes in other regionsor countries significantly different from theirclassroom to share their daily school life, todiscuss books they are reading, and to publishtheir creative writing.outcome: Bridge culturaldifferences and use differingperspectives to increase innovationand the quality of work.example: After reading severalissues of an international literary magazinethat publishes art, poetry, and prose, studentsproduce and evaluate their own submissions.One example of an international literarymagazine is,A Vision (www.iearn.org/avision).outcome: Leverage thecollective intelligence of groupswhen appropriate.example: Students conduct interviewswith leaders and members of several differentreligious communities in their city or town.Without making comparisons, students createshort videos explaining their personal identity,the process of locating and talking to peopleof diverse faiths, and what they learned intheir interviews.example: In partnership with internationalpeers or students from US communitiesthey are not familiar with who representsignificantly different backgrounds fromthem, students identify and research globaltrends in communication and the impact ofthese trends on them locally and personally.Students use online communication tools suchas Voice-Over-IP, or webcasting tools such aspodcasts, videos, and wikis, as they gather theirinformation, collaborate on the products, andreflect on the project.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  15. 15. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 15Productivity AccountabilityLIFE CAREER SKILLS• Setting and meeting highstandards and goals fordelivering quality workon time• Demonstrating diligenceand a positive work ethic(e.g., being punctual andreliable)outcome: Demonstrate diligence and apositive work ethic (e.g., being punctual andreliable).example: Students complete a WebQuest toresearch three explorers of the New Worldwith the purpose of deciding which one theywould choose to sail with into unchartedwaters. Each task provides the scaffolding towrite a final essay. Upon completing a task,students return to home port, a checkpointto help them keep on track.outcome: Set and meet high standards andgoals for delivering quality work on time.example: After working with the teacherto understand the relevant state language artsstandards, students work together to rewritesome of these standards into language that isunderstandable by other adolescents.With thesetranslated standards in mind, students workthroughout the academic year on a set scheduleto create electronic portfolios of self-selectedwork across the curriculum.Artifacts may includeaudio clips, video clips, digital photographs,samples of writing in a variety of genres, postsfrom appropriate social networking tools, andother work such as artifacts from multi-uservirtual environments. In a culminating piece, thestudents reflect on progress through the year aswell as evaluating their achievement in relation tothe translated standards.outcome: Demonstrate diligence and apositive work ethic (e.g., being punctual andreliable).example: After reading a book by a localauthor, the student generates substantiveinterview questions and schedules a telephoneor videoconference interview with the authorwith the goal of gathering autobiographicalinformation, insights into their work as anauthor, and quotes to use in a literary analysisof the work.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade
  16. 16. 177 N Church Avenue, Suite 305 Tucson,AZ 85701 520-623-2466 21stcenturyskills.org Publication date: 11/08 16Leadership ResponsibilityLIFE CAREER SKILLS• Using interpersonal andproblem-solving skills toinfluence and guide otherstoward a goal• Leveraging strengths ofothers to accomplish acommon goal• Demonstrating integrityand ethical behavior• Acting responsibly withthe interests of the largercommunity in mindoutcome: Leverage strengths of others toaccomplish a common goal.example: Students work in teams tocomplete the task of researching andassembling survival kits for regional severeweather conditions. Students will develop amultimedia advertising campaign for marketingthe kits.outcome: Demonstrate integrity and ethicalbehavior.example: Students create a performance,picture book, public service video, or podcast toshare with an audience of younger students toillustrate best practices for online safety.outcome: Act responsibly with the interestsof the larger community in mind.example: Students volunteer to lead anafter-school book club, creative writing club, ortechnology club for younger students.4th Grade 8th Grade 12th Grade

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