Students’
views
of
learning
with

            technologies

  Dr
Kathryn
Moyle
                    Dr
Guus
Wijngaards

 As...
Purpose
of
session

  What
are
students’
views
about
learning
with

  technologies
and
how
can
we
use
these
to

  inform
p...
Web 2.0 Definition

Online application that uses the World Wide
Web (www) as a platform and allows for
participatory invol...
CONTEXT

Key Technology Trends

Time‐to‐AdopFon:
One
Year
or
Less


 Collabora=ve
Environments


 Online
Communica=on
Tools


   Ti...
Research

•  Australia
and
The

   Netherlands

   –  University
of
Canberra

   –  INHolland
University

•  USA

   –  Co...
Where
to
from
here?

Student
voices
–
Stage
1


•  Surveys
and
focus
groups


Student
voices
–
Stage
2


•  video
vigneVes...
Findings
from
research
in

Australia
and
The
Netherlands

Access and use of technologies

                          Primary

          Secondary
      VET
   Pre‐service

120




1...
Reasons for using the Internet
Australia
                         The
Netherlands


•    Searching
for
informaFon
     Sea...
Social networking

•  All
cohorts
indicated
interest
in
sites
such
as

   You
Tube
and
Flickr

•  A
majority
of
primary
an...
Social sites for school or not?

                      Australia
&
The
Netherlands

       Sites like YouTube and Flickr a...
USA: Students’ Lives
District administrators rate the effect of Web 2.0 applications on student’s life and
education.
Why be concerned?
Improving student learning through the use of
Web 2.0
•  Keeping students interested and engaged
•  Meet...
Learning styles and educational
     value of technologies
All
cohorts
in
both
countries
indicated


•  they
prefer
to
lea...
But
…
there
are
challenges

VariaFons
in
students’
experiences


•  Some
educators
across
all
sectors
with
good

   skills...
Experiences of different teaching & learning
                   styles
    %           Most of the time we    Work a lot w...
Support for learning with technologies


% responses     There are enough people to    My teacher/lecturer is able to
    ...
Support for learning with technologies

% responses     My teachers'/lecturers skills    My teachers' /lecturers’
        ...
Reality:
Not
experienced
users

Percentage
of
Superintendents
indica=ng
the
highest
level
of
use
he/she
makes
of

specific
...
Reality: Access


70% school districts ban social networking
72% school districts ban chat rooms
Most other Web 2.0 tools ...
Reports

Australian
report
available
from:

hlp://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/
  DigitalEducaFonRevoluFon/Resources/Pages/
...
Zing

Students’
 Views 
of 
Learning 
with
 Technologies
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Students’
 Views 
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Learning 
with
 Technologies

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During the Learning and Technology World Forum 2010 Kathryn Moyle and Guus Wijngaards organized an interactive presentation (using ZING) about 'What are 'students' voices' about learning with technologies and how can we use these to inform preparations for future learning?

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Students’
 Views 
of 
Learning 
with
 Technologies

  1. 1. Students’
views
of
learning
with
 technologies
 Dr
Kathryn
Moyle
 Dr
Guus
Wijngaards
 Associate
Professor
 Professor
 University
of
Canberra
 INHolland
University
 Australia
 The
Netherlands
 Support
from

 Mr
Keith
Krueger,
CEO,
Consor=um
for
School
Networking
(CoSN),
 USA
 Mr
Richard
Sparks,
Learning
Technologies
Manager,
Academies







 Enterprise
Trust,
UK


  2. 2. Purpose
of
session
 What
are
students’
views
about
learning
with
 technologies
and
how
can
we
use
these
to
 inform
preparaFons
for
students’
learning
in
 the
future?
 Using
Zing
to
support
discussion
about
 •  new
models
of
educa=onal
prac=ce;
 •  the
role
of
emerging
and
mobile
technologies
may
have
in
 future
learning
environments;
and
 •  how
data
collected
from
students
can
be
used
across
 na=onal
borders
to
gain
interna=onal
insights
into
the
 benefits
and
challenges
of
learning
with
technologies.



  3. 3. Web 2.0 Definition Online application that uses the World Wide Web (www) as a platform and allows for participatory involvement, collaboration, and interactions among users. Web 2.0 is also characterized by the creation and sharing of intellectual and social resources by end users.
  4. 4. CONTEXT

  5. 5. Key Technology Trends Time‐to‐AdopFon:
One
Year
or
Less
 
 Collabora=ve
Environments
 
 Online
Communica=on
Tools
 
 Time‐to‐AdopFon:
Two
to
Three
Years
 
 Mobiles
 
 Cloud
Compu=ng
 Time‐to‐AdopFon:
Four
to
Five
Years
 
 Smart
Objects
 
 The
Personal
Web

  6. 6. Research
 •  Australia
and
The
 Netherlands
 –  University
of
Canberra
 –  INHolland
University
 •  USA
 –  CoSN
 –  Project
Tomorrow
 •  UK
 –  BECTA
 –  Futurelab

 –  Na=onal
Union
of
Students
 •  2010
and
beyond
 hVp://studentsvoices.org/

  7. 7. Where
to
from
here?
 Student
voices
–
Stage
1

 •  Surveys
and
focus
groups
 Student
voices
–
Stage
2

 •  video
vigneVes

 •  hVp://studentsvoices.org/
 Case
studies
 •  Edited
book

  8. 8. Findings
from
research
in
 Australia
and
The
Netherlands

  9. 9. Access and use of technologies
 Primary

 Secondary
 VET
 Pre‐service
 120
 100
 80
 60
 40
 20
 0
 
AUS
 
AUS
 AUS
 NL
 
AUS
 NL
 
AUS
 NL
 
NL
 
NL
 Everyday
 1‐2
=mes
a
week
 1‐2
month

 Not
o_en
 Never
 Majority
of
students
access
and
use
of
the
Internet
from
 home
at
least
1‐2
weekly
–
older
students,
everyday



  10. 10. Reasons for using the Internet Australia
 The
Netherlands
 •  Searching
for
informaFon
 Searching
for
informaFon
 (range
91%‐100%)
 (range
82%
‐
100%)
 •  Finding
locaFons

 Finding
locaFons
 
 (range
59%‐94%)
 (range
45%
‐
76%)
 •  Talking
with
friends
using
 Talking
with
friends
using
IM
 Instant
Messaging
(IM)
 
 (range
73%
‐
89%)
 (range
64%‐94%)
 Downloading
music
 •  Downloading
music

 
 (range
48%
‐
81%)
 
 (range
42%‐86%)
 ContribuFng
to
social
 •  ContribuFng
to
social
 networking
sites
 networking
sites

 
 (range
42%
‐
84%)
 
 (range
40%‐69%)

  11. 11. Social networking
 •  All
cohorts
indicated
interest
in
sites
such
as
 You
Tube
and
Flickr
 •  A
majority
of
primary
and
secondary
students
 responded
they
use
MSN
for
learning
purposes
 •  Pre‐service
and
early
career
teachers
indicated
 they
had
used
Facebook
to
support
their
 learning
 •  There
were
differing
views
expressed
by
the
 respecFve
parFcipant
cohorts
about
the
value
 of
social
networking
and
online
media
sites
for
 students’
learning


  12. 12. Social sites for school or not?
 Australia
&
The
Netherlands
 Sites like YouTube and Flickr are for fun- not for learning 120
 100
 80
 60
 Disagree
 Agree
 40
 20
 0
 AU
 NL
 AU
 NL
 AU
 NL
 AU
 NL
 AU
 NL
 Primary
 Secondary
 VET
 Trainee
teachers
 Early
Career


  13. 13. USA: Students’ Lives District administrators rate the effect of Web 2.0 applications on student’s life and education.
  14. 14. Why be concerned? Improving student learning through the use of Web 2.0 •  Keeping students interested and engaged •  Meeting the needs of different kinds of learners •  Developing critical thinking skills
  15. 15. Learning styles and educational value of technologies All
cohorts
in
both
countries
indicated

 •  they
prefer
to
learn
using
a
variety
of
styles
 that
are
appropriate
for
the
outcomes
 required
 •  they
like
learning
that
includes
technologies
 •  ‘learning
with
technologies’
is
one
form
of
 ‘hands‐on‐learning’
 •  their
learning
experiences
include
working
in
 groups,
solving
problems
and
using
 technologies


  16. 16. But
…
there
are
challenges
 VariaFons
in
students’
experiences
 •  Some
educators
across
all
sectors
with
good
 skills
in
teaching
and
learning
with
 technologies
 •  Quality
and
speed
of
access
to
technologies

  17. 17. Experiences of different teaching & learning styles % Most of the time we Work a lot with Work in small groups Strongly have lessons where the computers
 agree/agree teachers give information & students sit & listen AU
 NL
 AU
 NL
 AU
 NL
 Primary 59 69 59 49 52 59 Secondary 63 61 48 40 52 60 VET 45 62 82 48 69 69 Trainee 82 63 47 31 72 63 teachers
  18. 18. Support for learning with technologies
 % responses There are enough people to My teacher/lecturer is able to assist me with technical support my learning with Agree most or issues at school/training/ computers and the Internet all of time university AU
 NL
 AU
 NL
 Primary 63 50 57 46 Secondary 73 59 51 37 VET 59 61 64 39 Trainee 58 93 28 68 teachers Early career 57 77 36 56
  19. 19. Support for learning with technologies
 % responses My teachers'/lecturers skills My teachers' /lecturers’ with technologies are good technical skills could be Agree most or improved all of time AU
 NL
 AU
 NL
 Primary 54 55 28 17 Secondary 54 40 44 30 VET 63 40 22 41 Trainee 33 69 50 83 teachers Early career 30 59 45 86
  20. 20. Reality:
Not
experienced
users
 Percentage
of
Superintendents
indica=ng
the
highest
level
of
use
he/she
makes
of
 specific

Web
2.0
applica=ons

 n=777
Superintendents

  21. 21. Reality: Access 70% school districts ban social networking 72% school districts ban chat rooms Most other Web 2.0 tools are allowed (e.g., blogging, wikis, sound files, visual media, posting messages, virtual worlds, interactive games, polls/surveys, etc.)
  22. 22. Reports
 Australian
report
available
from:
 hlp://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/ DigitalEducaFonRevoluFon/Resources/Pages/ Resources.aspx
 The
Netherlands
report
available
from:
 hlp://www.inholland.nl/elearning
 CoSN
report
available
from
 hlp://www.cosn.org/Default.aspx?id=132&tabid=4189

  23. 23. Zing


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