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Cultural Quiz - Across Borders

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Cultural Quiz - Across Borders

  1. 1. Start Quiz
  2. 2. Country: CHINA 1. You've just realized your Chinese counterpart at your new joint venture with a Shanghai company doesn't have your level of experience, or qualifications to do what's required of him. Do you: A Humbly pretend this is not the case B Ask for him to be replaced C Take command and make all decisions in your joint area of activity D Avoid having him perform any critical tasks
  3. 3. Incorrect. This approach has the risk of causing your counterpart to lose face amongst peers and become non-responsive. It can also cause many other problems. Perhaps more importantly, this could signal to the Chinese company that you do not understand their culture; In China, competence alone does not determine who gets which position. Next Question
  4. 4. Correct. A Humbly pretend this is not the case Most Chinese people admire humility, and will seek your advice in any case. Next Question
  5. 5. Choose the correct answer 2. The ___________ will use intuition and feelings to help them with final decisions, and emotional appeals rather than facts to persuade you. A Israelis B Germans C Japanese D Koreans
  6. 6. Incorrect. Although Israelis express strong feelings when they communicate, and compared to Americans are more likely to "argue", decisions are made more on facts than gut. The Japanese can be sticklers for details and accuracy of data, and will make many generalized decisions about you and your company based on the data provided. Germans require a great amount of details and fact to make decisions. Although their communications style may seem abrupt and demanding, they attempt to persuade by putting things in "black and white" terms. Next Question
  7. 7. Correct. Although their feelings and emotions might not always be apparent, many Koreans use these to influence and persuade you. D Koreans Next Question
  8. 8. Country: India 3. While delegating tasks to an Indian colleague of equal level in the organization, your questions are all responded to with a 'yes', or 'sure'. This usually means that he/she: 1 Is being respectful to you 2 Will do exactly as you ask 3 Understands your request 4 Is likely to change his mind later
  9. 9. Incorrect. A 'yes' answer means many different things in many different cultures. While a "yes" answer may in itself be respectfully said, that is not the primary motivation. Many times this will be said to simply acknowledge that your request is understood. While Indians are comfortable with "repackaging" their replies at a later time, replying with a 'yes' does not necessarily mean that a commitment has been made. But nor does it mean you have been intentionally mislead, as between Indians vague and ambiguous answers are part of life. Next Question
  10. 10. Correct. Answering "yes" provides flexibility; it acknowledges the request, but doesn’t necessarily imply a commitment one way or the other. However, it is not intended to intentionally mislead you. How can that be? Let us explain to you and your team. 3 Understands your request Next Question
  11. 11. Country: Brazil 4. Which of these is probably the most important factor to bear in mind when doing business in Brazil? A Brazilians are very wary of foreigners B Brazilians take a very relaxed approach to business C Business is only really done with people they like and trust D Brazilians have very little tolerance for over committing
  12. 12. Incorrect. Brazilians are not particularly wary of foreigners, but that said, business is only really done with people they like and trust. Strong personal relationships can make or break a deal, and influence almost all business situations. Brazilians are apt to over commit, or make a promise which they can not live up to if it helps to get everyone to agree. Next Question
  13. 13. Correct. Strong personal relationships can make or break a deal, and influence almost all business situations. C Business is only really done with people they like and trust Next Question
  14. 14. Country: Japan 5. A key reason for the Japanese to agree to a meeting with foreign business people in their office is to: 1 Seek further information 2 Negotiate with management, and come to a decision 3 Exchange ideas, and brainstorm on long standing obstacles 4 Build the relationship, and share sensitive information
  15. 15. Incorrect. We know too many managers who make the trip to Japan to "discuss" or resolve issues in real-time, only to be disappointed. There are many reasons as to why this is not typical of Japanese teams, and anyone dealing with Japan had best be aware, or wind up being amongst the disappointed. While some relationship building occurs during office meetings, much more takes place outside the office over meals, drinks, entertainment, or golf. And it's during these occasions that the Japanese will confide in you things that they would never mention in an office setting. Many Americans might not realize that they are being "evaluated" during such times, so be aware. Next Question
  16. 16. Correct. 1 Seek further information The Japanese want to know as much as they possibly can. But to Americans, sometimes it can seem they do it to a fault. Fortunately there are ways to lessen the frustration, and move their process along. Do your employees know how? Next Question
  17. 17. Country: China 6. You've finally closed that deal, after exhausting both your patience and your company's travel budget. Now, two weeks later, the Chinese are asking for special considerations that change the terms of the agreement. How do they justify doing this? And most importantly, what can you do? Chinese have a tendency to not be truthful about their real intentions, and will try to A manipulate your discussions to their advantage. It is best not to trust what they say. The contract, for most Americans, represents the end of the negotiation. For the Chinese, however, it's just the beginning. So it's always advisable to leave yourself some room for B giving further concessions. The Chinese believe it is not appropriate to make final decisions in your presence and their coming back to you simply signifies that that after further internal discussions they C changed their minds. But they can be coerced into doing so, so therefore it is best to give them an ultimatum before the meeting ends. D All of the above.
  18. 18. Incorrect. Americans often mistake the Chinese propensity for seeking special favors or conditions later for not being trustworthy. If you learn how to prepare for their continuing negotiations, you will build stronger relationships, and at better terms. Furthermore, attempts to coercing them with ultimatums can damage their trust in you as a business partner. Next Question
  19. 19. Correct. Once a deal is made, the Chinese view their counterparts as trustworthy partners who can be relied upon for special favors, i.e. new terms in the contract. The contract, for most Americans, represents the end of the negotiation. For the Chinese, however, it's just the beginning. So it's always advisable to leave yourself some room for B giving further concessions. Next Question
  20. 20. Country: South Korea 7. When working with Koreans, this group characteristic is the most important to establish from the beginning: 1 Achievement 2 Consensus 3 Loyalty 4 Harmony
  21. 21. Incorrect. While achievement, consensus, and harmony are all of interest to Koreans, loyalty is typically a more profound characteristic. In fact, loyalty is so strong in South Korea that many would consider it more important than "honesty", as Americans would define it. This can cause mistrust and conflicts between Koreans and others. Next Question
  22. 22. Correct. In fact, loyalty is so strong in South Korea that many would consider it more important than "honesty", as Americans would define it. This can cause mistrust and conflicts between Koreans and others. 3 Loyalty Next Question
  23. 23. Country: Finland 8. Which best describes typical traits of Finnish decision making: 1 Consultative, consensus driven, requires several meetings, and decisions are normally binding. Democratic but decisive, with fact-based best/worst case scenarios 2 discussions. Decisions are binding, so be careful what you commit. 3 Autocratic, top down approach after many long winded discussions, with sometimes dubious and ambiguous finality. Decisions are made based on hierarchy, in an unhurried fashion. 4 While binding, it is permissible to renegotiate as deemed appropriate by both parties, in a non-confrontational manner.
  24. 24. Incorrect. These characteristics are much more typical of another European country. If you’re not sure where to elevate an issue, or what motivates people to make a decision, then how can you truly be effective? Not knowing who decides collectively or individually, or whose organization is hierarchical or flat, may cause you to alienate the people in either country. Learn more about the culture you’re working with and you’ll get better results. Next Question
  25. 25. Correct. Finns are democratic but decisive, with fact-based best/worst case scenarios discussions, and binding decisions. But be aware that other Scandinavian countries have very different behaviors! Democratic but decisive, with fact-based best/worst case scenarios 2 discussions. Decisions are binding, so be careful what you commit. Next Question
  26. 26. Total Questions Score per Question Correct Answers Wrong Answers Total Score Restart

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