Chapter Five: “Cathy” Summary   In this chapter, Esperanza first meets another child resident of Mango Street, who she cal...
Chapter Five: “Cathy” Summary   From Cathy herself, the self-proclaimed great great grand cousin of the queen of France, t...
Chapter Five: “Cathy” Analysis This chapter is full of spare and vivid descriptions that allow the reader to see the world...
Chapter Five: “Cathy” Analysis Yet while Esperanza's excitement might be that of any normal adolescent, her keen perceptio...
Chapter Five: “Cathy” Analysis As in so many other chapters, again we see the theme of the shame of poverty. Esperanza is ...
Chapter Five: “Cathy” Analysis The root of Esperanza's humiliation and resentment of her situation is real, as Cathy's fam...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Chapter Five Analysis

1,982 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,982
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter Five Analysis

  1. 1. Chapter Five: “Cathy” Summary In this chapter, Esperanza first meets another child resident of Mango Street, who she calls Cathy Queen of Cats. Cathy's monologue is the first knowledge Esperanza has of her neighborhood, which is indeed composed of a colorful cast. This novel is as much about finding a place as it is about finding one’s self.
  2. 2. Chapter Five: “Cathy” Summary From Cathy herself, the self-proclaimed great great grand cousin of the queen of France, to Joe the Baby Grabber, Cathy's descriptions are full of promise that Esperanza will have much to observe and explore. The diction of Cathy's speech is that of teenage gossip and indeed reflects the favorite pastime of the occupants of Mango Street. This novel is as much about finding a place as it is about finding one’s self.
  3. 3. Chapter Five: “Cathy” Analysis This chapter is full of spare and vivid descriptions that allow the reader to see the world of Mango Street with Esperanza's eyes. The excitement the young girl experiences while relating the tale of the "queen of cats" is evident in the repetition “Cathy who is queen of cats has cats and cats and cats. Baby cats, big cats, skinny cats” (13). This novel is as much about finding a place as it is about finding one’s self.
  4. 4. Chapter Five: “Cathy” Analysis Yet while Esperanza's excitement might be that of any normal adolescent, her keen perception and poetic vision of the world is distinctly hers. This is not only evident by the many kinds of creatures she picks out from the pack, but from diction such as “Cats taking a walk on the dinner table” (13). Indeed, Esperanza notes the humor of her world. The simile, "cats asleep like little donuts” (13) emphasizes the joy Esperanza creates for herself by appreciating the little details of everyday life. This novel is as much about finding a place as it is about finding one’s self.
  5. 5. Chapter Five: “Cathy” Analysis As in so many other chapters, again we see the theme of the shame of poverty. Esperanza is acutely aware of being part of a racial and economic group that dooms a neighborhood to "getting bad." It is important to note Esperanza's acute awareness of Cathy's family "inherit(ing) the family house" in France. This novel is as much about finding a place as it is about finding one’s self.
  6. 6. Chapter Five: “Cathy” Analysis The root of Esperanza's humiliation and resentment of her situation is real, as Cathy's family will “move a little farther north from Mango Street, a little farther away every time people like us keep moving in” (13). In this, perhaps one of the most heart-wrenching declarations of the story, we see that Esperanza understands that she is an unwanted element in society. This novel is as much about finding a place as it is about finding one’s self.

×