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Aristotle's poetics

Aristotle's Poetics (Greek: Περὶ ποιητικῆς, Latin: De Poetica;[1] c. 335 BCE[2]) is the earliest surviving work of dramatic theory and the first extant philosophical treatise to focus on literary theory.[3]

In it, Aristotle offers an account of what he calls "poetry" (a term which in Greek literally means "making" and in this context includes drama—comedy, tragedy, and the satyr play—as well as lyric poetry and epic poetry).

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Aristotle's poetics

  1. 1. POETICSPOETICS By : AristotleBy : Aristotle Prepared by : Littymol JosephPrepared by : Littymol Joseph
  2. 2. AristotleAristotle (c. 384-322 B.C.E. )(c. 384-322 B.C.E. ) • Ancient Greek PhilosopherAncient Greek Philosopher • Founder of literary criticismFounder of literary criticism • Disciple of Plato and teacher of Alexander the GreatDisciple of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great • Dante called him “the master of those who know”Dante called him “the master of those who know” • Plato referred to Aristotle ‘‘as the mind’’Plato referred to Aristotle ‘‘as the mind’’ • Main article:Main article: Corpus AristotelicumCorpus Aristotelicum
  3. 3. Reasons for PoetryReasons for Poetry • Poetics was the objections to dramatic poetryPoetics was the objections to dramatic poetry expressed by his teacher Plato in hisexpressed by his teacher Plato in his Republic.Republic. • It is a reply to his master Plato.It is a reply to his master Plato. • Plato considered imitation merely as mimicry or aPlato considered imitation merely as mimicry or a servile copy of nature.servile copy of nature. • Plato compared poetry to painting.Plato compared poetry to painting. • Poetry presents a copy of nature as it is. PoetryPoetry presents a copy of nature as it is. Poetry twice removed from reality and it’s a ‘shadow oftwice removed from reality and it’s a ‘shadow of shadows’.shadows’.
  4. 4. Poetics (c.335 B.C.)Poetics (c.335 B.C.) Short treatise of twenty-six chapters, forty-six pages, sixShort treatise of twenty-six chapters, forty-six pages, six parts.parts. • 1-5 :Introductory remarks on poetry and its1-5 :Introductory remarks on poetry and its classificationclassification • 6-19 :Tragedy6-19 :Tragedy • 20-22 :Poetic diction20-22 :Poetic diction • 23 :Narrative poetry and tragedy23 :Narrative poetry and tragedy • 24-26 :Epic is compared with tragedy24-26 :Epic is compared with tragedy • 25 :Objections are answered25 :Objections are answered
  5. 5. Theory of imitationTheory of imitation Three ways of imitationThree ways of imitation • Means or medium of imitation (serious action).Means or medium of imitation (serious action). sound, form, coloursound, form, colour • Objects of imitation (men in action).Objects of imitation (men in action). • Manner of imitation (verse in dialogue).Manner of imitation (verse in dialogue). ΔΔ narrativenarrative ΔΔ dramaticdramatic
  6. 6. TragedyTragedy Definition of TragedyDefinition of Tragedy ““Tragedy is the imitation of an action that is serious,Tragedy is the imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude, in a languagecomplete, and of a certain magnitude, in a language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, eachembellished with each kind of artistic ornament, each kind brought separately in separate parts of the work,kind brought separately in separate parts of the work, in the form of action and not in the narrative form,in the form of action and not in the narrative form, with incidents arousing fear and pity and wherewithwith incidents arousing fear and pity and wherewith to accomplish the catharsis of such emotions”.to accomplish the catharsis of such emotions”.
  7. 7. Formative parts of TragedyFormative parts of Tragedy Six formative parts of tragedy Plot Character Thought Song Spectacle Diction
  8. 8. PlotPlot Plot is the ordering of incidents.Plot is the ordering of incidents. • SimpleSimple Plot is simple when the change in the fortunes ofPlot is simple when the change in the fortunes of the hero takes place without peripety and discovery.the hero takes place without peripety and discovery. • ComplexComplex The plot is complex when it involves one or theThe plot is complex when it involves one or the other both. The peripety is the change in the fortunesother both. The peripety is the change in the fortunes of the hero and the discovery is a change fromof the hero and the discovery is a change from ignorance to knowledge.ignorance to knowledge.
  9. 9. Characteristics of PlotCharacteristics of Plot Plot should be whole It should have a magnitude Probability and Necessity Willing suspension of disbelief Organic unity
  10. 10. Formative elements of PlotFormative elements of Plot Peripetia- reversal of fortune Anagnorisis-recognition or discovery of truth Suffering-destructive or painful action
  11. 11. CharacterCharacter Characters are the agents for moving according to theCharacters are the agents for moving according to the plot.plot. Essential features of characterisationEssential features of characterisation • Characters should be good.Characters should be good. • Characters should be appropriate.Characters should be appropriate. • Characters should be true to life.Characters should be true to life. • Characters should be consistent.Characters should be consistent.
  12. 12. ThoughtThought Thought is the intellectual element in a tragedy. It is theThought is the intellectual element in a tragedy. It is the ability of the dramatist to say what is possible andability of the dramatist to say what is possible and appropriate.appropriate. Proof and reputation Production of emotional effect Introduction of the importance or significance of anything
  13. 13. Diction and StyleDiction and Style Diction is the choice and arrangement of words andDiction is the choice and arrangement of words and images in a literary composition.images in a literary composition. Six types of wordsSix types of words • Current or ordinary wordsCurrent or ordinary words • Foreign terms borrowed or dialectsForeign terms borrowed or dialects • MetaphorsMetaphors • Ornamental periphrasisOrnamental periphrasis • Invented wordsInvented words • Not invented, but made new lengtheningNot invented, but made new lengthening or shorteningor shortening
  14. 14. Songs or MelodySongs or Melody Prologue Episode Choric Song Exode Songs is the pleasurable addition to a play. In a tragedy, song is provided by the chorus.
  15. 15. Spectacle or Stage effectSpectacle or Stage effect Spectacle is the mode of imitation by which the story isSpectacle is the mode of imitation by which the story is presented on a stage before an audience. It is the sightpresented on a stage before an audience. It is the sight of disaster and Aristotle calls this can raise fear andof disaster and Aristotle calls this can raise fear and pity in the spectator.pity in the spectator. Types of spectaclesTypes of spectacles • PlotPlot • CharacterCharacter • AnagnorisisAnagnorisis • HamartiaHamartia
  16. 16. Epic and TragedyEpic and Tragedy Poetry is divided into epic or narrative poetry andPoetry is divided into epic or narrative poetry and dramatic poetry on the basis of the manner ofdramatic poetry on the basis of the manner of imitation. Epic is the narration of an action in verseimitation. Epic is the narration of an action in verse and tragedy is the dramatic representation of anand tragedy is the dramatic representation of an action.action.
  17. 17. Similarities between Epic andSimilarities between Epic and TragedyTragedy • Use of refined dictionUse of refined diction • Both in tragedy and epic the poet should know the artBoth in tragedy and epic the poet should know the art of telling lies the right way.of telling lies the right way. • Both should have the ability of artistic imitationBoth should have the ability of artistic imitation (mimesis).(mimesis).
  18. 18. Difference between Epic andDifference between Epic and TragedyTragedy EpicEpic • NarrativeNarrative • LongLong • Unity of actionUnity of action • Use of one metreUse of one metre Heroic coupletHeroic couplet • All elements of tragedyAll elements of tragedy not song and spectaclenot song and spectacle TragedyTragedy • DramaticDramatic • Must be confined to aMust be confined to a single revolution of thesingle revolution of the sunsun • Three unitiesThree unities • Use various metresUse various metres • Six elements of tragedySix elements of tragedy
  19. 19. Rules of TragedyRules of Tragedy • It is an imitation of an action.It is an imitation of an action. • He should imaginatively visualize the action.He should imaginatively visualize the action. • He should workout the emotions with the veryHe should workout the emotions with the very gestures of his dramatic personages.gestures of his dramatic personages. • He should begin with the universal form of the plot,He should begin with the universal form of the plot, adding the names and episodes later.adding the names and episodes later.
  20. 20. Types of TragedyTypes of Tragedy • Complex tragedyComplex tragedy It consists of reversal and recognition of truth.It consists of reversal and recognition of truth. • Tragedy of sufferingTragedy of suffering Tragedy depicts suffering.Tragedy depicts suffering. • Tragedy of characterTragedy of character Character more involved than plot.Character more involved than plot. • Tragedy of spectacleTragedy of spectacle It depends upon the sensational effectsIt depends upon the sensational effects produced by the actors, the costume designers andproduced by the actors, the costume designers and other mechanical and artificial devices.other mechanical and artificial devices.
  21. 21. Types of RecognitionTypes of Recognition Anagnorisis (discovery or recognition of truth)Anagnorisis (discovery or recognition of truth) • Signs or objects, symbolsSigns or objects, symbols • Author tells himselfAuthor tells himself • Discovery from memoryDiscovery from memory • Process of reasoningProcess of reasoning • Discovery arising from the false reasoningDiscovery arising from the false reasoning
  22. 22. Superiority of Tragedy over EpicSuperiority of Tragedy over Epic • It has all the elements of an epic and has alsoIt has all the elements of an epic and has also spectacle and song which the epic lacks.spectacle and song which the epic lacks. • Unity of action only in a tragedy not in an epic.Unity of action only in a tragedy not in an epic. • Simply reading the play without performing it isSimply reading the play without performing it is already very potent.already very potent. • Tragedy is shorter that is more compact concentratedTragedy is shorter that is more compact concentrated effect.effect.
  23. 23. Ideal Tragic HeroIdeal Tragic Hero • He should not be an utter villain.He should not be an utter villain. • He should neither the perfectly good not utterly bad.He should neither the perfectly good not utterly bad. • He must be intermediary sort of person.He must be intermediary sort of person. • He must posses both qualities and weakness.He must posses both qualities and weakness. • He must be a human being.He must be a human being. • Hamartia (tragic flow).Hamartia (tragic flow).
  24. 24. Thank YouThank You

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