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True Facts on Studying vs Cramming

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Is it better to study or is it better to cram? How fast am I forgetting things that I learn? Find out the answers to these questions and more with this infographic on studying and memory.

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True Facts on Studying vs Cramming

  1. 1. I want to remember more things! It is best to review the information within 24 hours of learning. Reviewing again the next day, and then a week later will help solidify the memory. The best time to finish cramming is 20 minutes or less before the test, so everything is still fresh. Reviewing earlier and more often will help you remember information much longer– up to several years! When is the best time to study? STUDYING VS CRAMMING vs How long does it take? The content from a one hour lecture Is it worth it to review? That’s up to you! Cramming looks like a pretty good idea right now, but does it save time? Total time required when... cramming reviewing Day 1 10 min Day 30 50 min Day 2 5 min Day 7 4 min Whether you’re keen to learn or just want to pass your classes, there are optimal times to study in order to meet your learning goals. Wait, so how fast am I forgetting stuff?! According to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve, if you don’t review the information again... After You recall 20 min 1 hour 9 hours 1 day 2 days 6 days 1 month 58% 44% 36% 34% 28% 25% 21% There are a few tricks you can use to improve memory retention. Sensory Memory Creating the memory... Strengthening the memory... Memories are connections between different cells in your brain. These neurons pass electrical signals to one another. The more you recall a memory, the stronger the connection becomes. Memories are never lost, but connections will degrade over time and become harder to recall. Retrieval Rehearsal Attention Working Memory Long-Term Memory Less than 1 second A few seconds to a minute Potentially unlimited How does memory work? Day 1: the lecture 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Day 30: the exam ?? ? If we follow the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve... For those of you who are not geniuses, Ebbinghaus developed the Forgetting Curve in 1885, demonstrating the rate at which our brain forgets new information. PROSCONS Overall less time spent studying Less stress before the test Retaining information long-term Need to be really organized Extra time required to review More time to do what you want instead of studying! No planning required! More stress when cramming No long-term retention The Keener The Slacker Sensory Input Mnemonics To put it simply, mnemonics are techniques to make new information more relatable. A common mnemonic device is using acronyms to memorize a list. The letters in the acronym prompts the memory, and connects the information. Active recall occurs when you engage your brain as you’re learning. Some active recall strategies include answering questions in your head as you’re learning, drawing out a diagram from memory, or explaining something you just read to someone else. Active recall If you can relate new information to things you already know, or things that are personally relevant to you, it will be easier to recall because you will be creating more connections to it in your brain. Relate the topic to yourself 50minutes 19minutes 31minutes saved when reviewing Howmuchyou’llprobablyremember Q. A. CREATED BY STINSON DESIGN WWW.STINSONDESIGN.COM www.brainconnection.brainhq.com/2013/03/12/how-we-remember-and-why-we-forget/ www.spring.org.uk/2012/10/how-memory-works-10-things-most-people-get-wrong.php www.csub.edu/~bruff/The%20Forgetting%20Curve.pdf www.elearningcouncil.com/learning-theory/overcoming-ebbinghaus-curve-how-soon-we-forget/ www.s-media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/originals/88/36/af/8836af5ed2b11fecde84c6945bc4358d.jpg www.coursehero.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/12.04-1.png www.elearninginfographics.com/wp-content/uploads/Memory-Retention-and-the-Forgetting-Curve-Infographic.png STUDYING CRAMMING TRUE FACTS ON ROYGBIV
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Is it better to study or is it better to cram? How fast am I forgetting things that I learn? Find out the answers to these questions and more with this infographic on studying and memory.

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