Auditory Sense (Hearing) pg 6
Structure of the EarOuter Ear
Structure of the EarOuter Ear• Auricle (pinna): fleshy, visible part of the  ear. Made of elastic cartilage. Helps  collec...
Structure of the EarOuter Ear• Auricle (pinna): fleshy, visible part of the  ear. Made of elastic cartilage. Helps  collec...
Middle Ear
Middle Ear• Tympanic membrane (eardrum):  Separates outer ear from middle ear.  Sound waves cause it to vibrate
Middle Ear• Tympanic membrane (eardrum):  Separates outer ear from middle ear.  Sound waves cause it to vibrate• Auditory ...
Middle Ear• Tympanic membrane• Auditory ossicles• Eustachian tube: Connects the middle  ear with the upper part of the thr...
Inner Ear
Inner Ear• Vestibule and Semicircular canals:  function in the sense of equilibrium
Inner Ear• Vestibule and Semicircular canals:  function in the sense of equilibrium• Cochlea: functions in hearing. Resemb...
Physiology of Hearing
Physiology of Hearing1. Sound waves cause the tympanic membrane   to vibrate
Physiology of Hearing1. Sound waves cause the tympanic membrane   to vibrate2. Malleus, incus, and stapes transfer vibrati...
Physiology of Hearing1. Sound waves cause the tympanic membrane   to vibrate2. Malleus, incus, and stapes transfer vibrati...
Physiology of Hearing1. Sound waves cause the tympanic membrane   to vibrate2. Malleus, incus, and stapes transfer vibrati...
Physiology of Hearing1. Sound waves cause the tympanic membrane   to vibrate2. Malleus, incus, and stapes transfer vibrati...
Pitch and Loudness• Pitch: Each region of the basilar  membrane is “tuned” to a particular  pitch. High pitched sounds cau...
Pitch and Loudness• Pitch: Each region of the basilar  membrane is “tuned” to a particular  pitch. High pitched sounds cau...
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Auditory sense

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Auditory sense

  1. 1. Auditory Sense (Hearing) pg 6
  2. 2. Structure of the EarOuter Ear
  3. 3. Structure of the EarOuter Ear• Auricle (pinna): fleshy, visible part of the ear. Made of elastic cartilage. Helps collect sound waves
  4. 4. Structure of the EarOuter Ear• Auricle (pinna): fleshy, visible part of the ear. Made of elastic cartilage. Helps collect sound waves• External auditory canal (meatus): Tube about 2.5 cm long. Contains hairs and glands that produce cerumen
  5. 5. Middle Ear
  6. 6. Middle Ear• Tympanic membrane (eardrum): Separates outer ear from middle ear. Sound waves cause it to vibrate
  7. 7. Middle Ear• Tympanic membrane (eardrum): Separates outer ear from middle ear. Sound waves cause it to vibrate• Auditory ossicles: 3 tiny bones– malleus (hammer), incus (anvil), and stapes (stirrup). Transmit vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear. Malleus is attached to the eardrum. Stapes is attached to the oval window
  8. 8. Middle Ear• Tympanic membrane• Auditory ossicles• Eustachian tube: Connects the middle ear with the upper part of the throat. Allows air pressure to equalize on both sides of the eardrum
  9. 9. Inner Ear
  10. 10. Inner Ear• Vestibule and Semicircular canals: function in the sense of equilibrium
  11. 11. Inner Ear• Vestibule and Semicircular canals: function in the sense of equilibrium• Cochlea: functions in hearing. Resembles a snail’s shell. Contains the organ of Corti, which sits on the basilar membrane and contains numerous hair cells that are linked to neurons
  12. 12. Physiology of Hearing
  13. 13. Physiology of Hearing1. Sound waves cause the tympanic membrane to vibrate
  14. 14. Physiology of Hearing1. Sound waves cause the tympanic membrane to vibrate2. Malleus, incus, and stapes transfer vibrations to the oval window
  15. 15. Physiology of Hearing1. Sound waves cause the tympanic membrane to vibrate2. Malleus, incus, and stapes transfer vibrations to the oval window3. Movement of the oval window causes waves to form in the fluid within the cochlea
  16. 16. Physiology of Hearing1. Sound waves cause the tympanic membrane to vibrate2. Malleus, incus, and stapes transfer vibrations to the oval window3. Movement of the oval window causes waves to form in the fluid within the cochlea4. The waves cause the basilar membrane to vibrate, which bends the hair cells on the organ of Corti
  17. 17. Physiology of Hearing1. Sound waves cause the tympanic membrane to vibrate2. Malleus, incus, and stapes transfer vibrations to the oval window3. Movement of the oval window causes waves to form in the fluid within the cochlea4. The waves cause the basilar membrane to vibrate, which bends the hair cells on the organ of Corti5. Bending stimulates nerve impulses, which are transmitted to the brain
  18. 18. Pitch and Loudness• Pitch: Each region of the basilar membrane is “tuned” to a particular pitch. High pitched sounds cause vibrations at the base of the membrane while low pitched sounds cause vibrations at the apex
  19. 19. Pitch and Loudness• Pitch: Each region of the basilar membrane is “tuned” to a particular pitch. High pitched sounds cause vibrations at the base of the membrane while low pitched sounds cause vibrations at the apex• Loudness: Loud sounds cause larger vibrations in the basilar membrane, which leads to more nerve impulses reaching the brain

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