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Harnessing ICTs for greater access to education for girls and women

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Presented at GWI Conference, 24 August 2016
Steve Vosloo

Published in: Education
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Harnessing ICTs for greater access to education for girls and women

  1. 1. Harnessing ICTs for greater access to education for girls and women GWI Conference, 24 August 2016 Steve Vosloo 1Presentation Title Arial Bold 7 pt Image by Photographer’s Name (Credit in black type) or Image by Photographer’s Name (Credit in white type) Image placeholder Image by Photographer’s Name (Credit in black type) or Image by Photographer’s Name (Credit in white type)
  2. 2. Agenda 01 The ask and opportunity 02 Project Literacy: Read to Kids 03 Every Child Learning 04 Challenges and recommendations 2 Image by Sudipto DasImage by Sudipto Das
  3. 3. The ask
  4. 4. 757m people are illiterate, 520m women
  5. 5. The opportunity
  6. 6. Digital revolution has brought many private benefits SOURCE: WDR 2016 team; http://www.internetlivestats.com/one-second/ (As compiled on May 29, 2015) A typical day in the life of the internet
  7. 7. Number of small & medium enterprises on Taobao (Alibaba): 5 MILLION & COUNTING SOURCE: http://www.alizila.com/chinas-online-cowboy-rounds-buyers DIGITAL MARKETPLACE Digital technologies are transforming BUSINESS
  8. 8. DIGITAL PAYMENTS Number of mobile money accounts worldwide: 300 MILLION & COUNTING (end of 2014) SOURCE: John Owens, Alliance for Financial Inclusion, June 2013. Digital technologies are transforming PEOPLE’S LIVES Where mobile money accounts outnumber bank accounts
  9. 9. DIGITAL IDENTITY Indians with digital identity: 950 MILLION & COUNTING SOURCE: http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/chennai/Trafficking- Victims-see-New-life-in-Aadhaar/2015/03/30/article2737396.ece. GSMA, The Mobile Economy Africa 2016 Digital technologies are transforming GOVERNMENT IN AFRICA Operators are tackling this issue in Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda (400 million people unregistered)
  10. 10. The mobile revolution in Africa At the end of 2015 … 46% subscribed to mobile services, equivalent to more than half a billion people 300 million mobile internet subscribers The tech start-up ecosystem is growing: approximately 310 active tech hubs across the region, including 180 accelerators or incubators Image placeholder 10SOURCE: GSMA, The Mobile Economy Africa 2016
  11. 11. Literacy
  12. 12. Project Literacy Pearson has convened Project Literacy, a diverse, coalition-led campaign to close literacy gap Our goal is that by 2030, all people— regardless of their geography, language, race, class or gender—are able to fulfil their potential through the power of words Image placeholder
  13. 13. Partners 13
  14. 14. Key activities Raising awareness and mobilizing action > More than 1bn people reached Advancing best practice > Supporting programmes that are proven and conducting research Innovating for new solutions > Project Literacy Lab > Read to Kids Image placeholder
  15. 15. 15 SOURCE: Mark West/UNESCO, Reading in the Mobile Era, 2014
  16. 16. 16 SOURCE: Mark West/UNESCO, Reading in the Mobile Era, 2014
  17. 17. 17 SOURCE: Mark West/UNESCO, Reading in the Mobile Era, 2014
  18. 18. 18 SOURCE: Mark West/UNESCO, Reading in the Mobile Era, 2014
  19. 19. 19 SOURCE: Mark West/UNESCO, Reading in the Mobile Era, 2014
  20. 20. 20 SOURCE: Mark West/UNESCO, Reading in the Mobile Era, 2014
  21. 21. www.readtokids.com
  22. 22. Read to Kids overview Pilot project in Delhi to promote pre-literacy skills by encouraging parents and caregivers to read to and with their young children (age 0-6) via mobile Timeframe: May 2015 – May 2017 KPIs: 20 000 frequent users 200 000 unique users Goal: learn how to create behavior change >> learning pilot SOURCE: Annya Crane, Worldreader
  23. 23. Research questions Parental Behavior Change Research conducted Centre for Early Childhood Education and Development (CECED) in Delhi. How has R2K changed parents' attitudes about reading to young children? How has R2K changed parents' understanding of the value of reading to young children? How has R2K changed parents' behaviors related to reading to children (frequency, duration, and quality of interaction)? SOURCE: Annya Crane, Worldreader
  24. 24. Webapp – Hindi, Bilingual and English stories Messaging the benefit Best practice tips for parents Culturally relevant, appropriate content in Hindi and English SOURCE: Annya Crane, Worldreader
  25. 25. Lessons learnt so far • There’s no reading to children culture in India (both in our target audience and above) • Access to smartphones is high >> native android app in the future • Willingness to use the data plan for reading is an issue • Parents lack confidence to read • Parents might need more than books to get them to use their phone to read to children – (Audio, interactive app…) • A broad-based approach is needed: app, content, activation points (Reading Champions host reading corners in clinics), media campaign SOURCE: Annya Crane, Worldreader
  26. 26. 26Presentation Title Arial Bold 7 pt
  27. 27. Every Child Learning
  28. 28. Every Child Learning Three-year partnership with Save the Children, worth over £1.5 million Goal: increase educational opportunities for Syrian refugees and host communities in Jordan, and innovate new solutions to help improve the delivery of education in emergency and conflict-affected settings Image placeholder
  29. 29. Every Child Learning To research and develop new solutions we are: > Gaining a deep contextual understanding of the unique needs of Syrian refugee children > Combining ethnographers and local researchers with our curriculum experts, learning and UX designers Site visits, journey mapping of “Nour”, etc. Image placeholder
  30. 30. Challenges
  31. 31. SOURCE: WDR 2016 team based on Research ICT Africa and ITU data 1. A significant digital divide remains 6 BILLION without BROADBAND 4 BILLION without INTERNET 2 BILLION without MOBILE PHONES 0.4 BILLION without A DIGITAL SIGNAL Divides persist between and within countries—in access and capability
  32. 32. Digital technologies have spread rapidly SOURCE: World Bank. Data at http://bit.do/WDR2016-MapO_1. The world, based on internet population (2014)
  33. 33. “By 2020 60% of the [African] population will still be unconnected. Significant barriers to adoption remain, particularly for underserved groups such as women, rural communities and young people.” GSMA, The Mobile Economy Africa 2016 33Presentation Title Arial Bold 7 pt
  34. 34. SOURCE: WDR 2016 team, based on Research ICT Africa surveys (various years) for 10 African countries. … between and within countries—in access and capability
  35. 35. The largest barriers are not in technology. We need to address cultural, societal, religious, political, economical, attitudinal, and geographic or security constraints. 35
  36. 36. Recommendations Be gender sensitive, not only gender specific ICT is not a panacea – address the non-technology issues Community sensitization and mobilization as well as political support are key Making the technology more affordable and coverage wider Content must be relevant Embed ICT and literacy improvement within life skills development for empowerment and voice Use ICT appropriately, design with the user 36SOURCE: Mark West/UNESCO, Reading in the Mobile Era, 2014; Carolina Belalcazar/UNESCO, Mobile Phones & Literacy: Empowerment in Women’s Hands, 2015
  37. 37. Links stevevosloo.com Project Literacy / Project Literacy Lab / @rewritinglives Report: Reading in the Mobile Era, 2014 (UNESCO) Report: Mobile Phones & Literacy: Empowerment in Women’s Hands, 2015 (UNESCO) UNESCO Mobile Learning Week 2015: Leveraging Technology to Empower Women and Girls 37

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