Eco-Industrial Park Concept

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Presentation to the Port of San Francisco on a concept to develop the Pier 90-94 Backlands into an eco-industrial park. Highlights include relocating an asphalt plant from a mixed industrial/residential setting and linking it with a concrete crushing plant, using the output of the concrete plant as input for the asphalt plant. Also looks into the feasability us building a biodiesel plant on-site that would use the output of the currently existing rendering plant.

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  • The Pier 90-94 Backlands site (“Backlands”) -44 acre site located south and upland of Islais Creek, -Within the Port’s 278 acre Pier 80-96 Maritime complex. -Undeveloped former landfill Most of the Pier 90-94 Backlands is designated in the Port's Waterfront Land Use Plan -Surrounded by the Port’s remaining modern cargo terminals at Piers 80, 92, and 94-96 -Currently handle primarily bulk, break bulk and other non-container cargoes -Adjacent to the Port's freight rail facilities.
  • The potential development ideas for the 44-acre site, -750,000 square-feet of warehousing space, -however studies show this is not economically feasible given the underlying land is on non-engineered landfill -would require extensive piling. -engineering analysis indicated the site would not be cost-effective to erect foundation-supported structures -primarily due to fill characteristics of the site. -Eco-Industrial Park that could include -City-owned Bio-Diesel Manufacturing plant, -new Public Utilities Commission (PUC) Waste Water Treatment/Food Digestion to replace an existing plant -solar power production facilities -relocation of the Department of Public Works (DPW) Asphalt Batch Plant with a new facility, and -concrete and asphalt crushing and recycling. The Eco-Industrial Park development concepts are based on the principles of supportive and compatible uses with maritime businesses, economic development, environmentally sustainable development that provides benefits for the community.
  • Potential Eco-Industrial Site Plan
  • Built 1952 and expanded several times since then. Completed in 1982. Handles 80% of city’s wastewater (The other 20% is handled by the Oceanside treatment plant, on the west side of SF) Combined wastewater treatment facility: Stormwater runoff Domestic wastewater Industrial wastewater Wastewater treated in dry weather: 67 mgd Wet season capacity: 250 mgd
  • What are biosolids?: Ninth stage of wastewater treatment production at SE facility Solids are thickened and mixed with other parts of previous treatments: Sludge Scum Anaerobic bacteria eat solids in digesters to stabilize sludge Byproduct is methane gas Gas is used fuel boilers, which warm digesters Co-generation facility onsite provides 30% of facility’s power needs
  • What are biosolids?: Ninth stage of wastewater treatment production at SE facility Solids are thickened and mixed with other parts of previous treatments: Sludge Scum Anaerobic bacteria eat solids in digesters to stabilize sludge Byproduct is methane gas Gas is used fuel boilers, which warm digesters Co-generation facility onsite provides 30% of facility’s power needs
  • Dedicate 14 acres of Backlands for Biosolids Segment of Water Treatment Current facility to be reconstructed (build in the 1950s) Current facility in extremely close to residential neighborhood Backlands site is downwind of the community
  • Transport solids such as biosolids pellets by barge rather than truck for inland agricultural uses Water transportation much more energy efficient and produces much lower carbon emissions
  • Reduce odors and emissions (?) by moving to other side of residential development Creates jobs [get numbers]: 9910 program Apprenticeship program Construction jobs Excess methane could be stored rather than flared (?) Transport of biosolids pellets by barge rather than truck reduces traffic and particulate emissions (?) Visual mitigation potential (some treatment sites look nice!)
  • Reduce odors and emissions (?) by moving to other side of residential development Creates jobs [get numbers]: 9910 program Apprenticeship program Construction jobs Excess methane could be stored rather than flared (?) Transport of biosolids pellets by barge rather than truck reduces traffic and particulate emissions (?) Visual mitigation potential (some treatment sites look nice!)
  • The new facility could potentially add food waste digesters (which can use scraps from Norcal Waste located nearby, or [GET NAME] facility, located in the backlands property) Food waste can be turned into compost The digesting process produces methane, which can be captured, stored, and burned for energy with a cogeneration facility. (Potential to produce 100% of facility’s energy needs.)
  • Eco-Industrial Park Concept

    1. 1. Eco-Industrial Parks <ul><li>Presidio School of Management </li></ul><ul><li>Business, Government & Civil Society Students: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Jane Bliss, Brett Bollinger, Olga Bolotina, Adam Cornelius, Eugenio de Hostos, Steve Puma, Anthony Radspieler </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Port of San Francisco </li></ul><ul><ul><li>David Beaupre, Brad Benson, James Hurley </li></ul></ul>December 16, 2007
    2. 2. Port of San Francisco
    3. 3. Eco-Industrial Park <ul><li>Schematic Design </li></ul>NORTH
    4. 4. <ul><li>Biodiesel: a fuel for tomorrow, in the Backlands, now </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>Proven </li></ul><ul><li>Efficient </li></ul><ul><li>Versatile </li></ul><ul><li>Renewable </li></ul>Biodiesel
    6. 6. Local Demand Increasing <ul><li>SF Climate Action Plan </li></ul><ul><li>High petroleum cost </li></ul><ul><li>Educated Public </li></ul><ul><li>Global Warming </li></ul>
    7. 7. Biodiesel in the Backlands <ul><li>Ideal “anchor tenant” for eco-industrial park </li></ul><ul><li>Local demand for biodiesel </li></ul><ul><ul><li>City of SF fleet, Norcal fleet, maritime fleet, </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Potential access to feedstock from adjacent rendering plant and, eventually, water treatment plant </li></ul><ul><li>Multimodal access to additional feedstocks and petroleum diesel for blending </li></ul>
    8. 8. BIODIESEL PLANT SAN FRANCISCO BAY OAKLAND RAILHEAD RENDERING PLANT CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO FLEET NORCAL RECYCLING TRUCKS BIODIESEL FUEL FEEDSTOCKS RICHMOND REFINERY PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO FLEET BIOGAS & ALGAE OIL Market Flows
    9. 9. Biodiesel Business Summary <ul><li>Projected Employment: 30-35 jobs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Local Hiring Enterprise Zone Incentives </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Rent to Port: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Long Term Ground Lease </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Biodiesel Supply </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Implementation Schedule: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Requests for Qualifications/Proposals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Port needs to act soon to compete effectively with other Biodiesel manufacturers </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Biosolids
    11. 11. Waste treatment process overview Source: http://sfwater.org/detail.cfm/MC_ID/14/MSC_ID/117/C_ID/3101
    12. 12. Waste treatment process overview <ul><li>Built 1952 </li></ul><ul><li>Combined wastewater treatment facility: </li></ul><ul><li>Domestic & Industrial wastewater </li></ul><ul><li>Stormwater runoff </li></ul><ul><li>Handles 80% of city’s wastewater </li></ul>Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant: Source: http://sfwater.org/detail.cfm/MC_ID/14/MSC_ID/117/MTO_ID/218/C_ID/2151/ListID/1
    13. 13. Biosolids Treatment Gas Digesters CPAS Blend Tank Gravity Filtration Belt Polymer Co-generator Boiler Flare
    14. 14. Biosolids Treatment Gas Digesters CPAS Blend Tank Gravity Filtration Belt Polymer Co-generator Boiler Flare
    15. 15. Move Biosolids to the Backlands Source: http://www.sfgov.org/site/port_page.asp?id=62772
    16. 16. Transport <ul><li>Pelletized Biosolids Output </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be used for agriculture + shipped inland </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Uses Barges rather than Trucks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduces Emissions </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Benefits to the Community Job Creation Reduced Traffic Noise and Pollution
    18. 18. Benefits to the Community Reduced odors Visual mitigation potential
    19. 19. Add Food Waste Digesters Food Waste Digester Compost Digested Residual Methane
    20. 20. VIDEO

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