Discover and act on insights about people

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Some of the most effective ways of understanding what customers want or need – going out and talking to them – are surprisingly indirect. Insights produced by these methods impact two facets of innovation: first as information that informs the development of new products and services, and second as catalysts for internal change. Steve discusses methods for exploring both solutions and needs and explores how an understanding of culture (yours and your customers) can drive design and innovation.

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Discover and act on insights about people

  1. Discover and Act on1 Insights About People
  2. In this session…Click to edit Master title styleSome of the most effective ways of understanding whatcustomers want or need – going out and talking to them –are surprisingly indirect.Insights produced by these methods impact two facets of innovation: first as information that informs the development of new products and services, and second as catalysts for internal change.UXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  3. Madness in Master titleClick to edit methods styleEthnographyEthnographic interviewsVideo ethnographyDepth-interviewsContextual researchHome visitsSite visitsExperience modelingDesign researchUser-centered designOne-on-onesCamera studiesUser safarisUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  4. Madness in Master titleClick to edit methods styleEthnographyEthnographic interviewsVideo ethnographyWhat-ever!Depth-interviewsContextual researchHome visitsSite visitsExperience modelingDesign researchUser-centered designOne-on-onesCamera studiesUser safarisUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  5. Whatever you want to call it…Click to edit Master title styleExamine people, ideally in their own context Gather their stories What are they doing? What does it mean?Synthesize the stories Find the patterns and connectionsApply to business and design problems Create new stories that reframe how the organization talks and thinks Use products, services, packaging, design to manifest that new story in the marketplaceUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  6. “Examine” using a title style Click to edit Masterrange of methodsInterview “Tell us about how you’re using this product…”Tasks “Can you draw me a map of your computer network?”Participation “Can you show me how I should make a Whopper?”Demonstration “Show us how you update your playlists.” “I’ll be the customer and you be the receptionist, and youRole-playing show me how they should respond.” UXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  7. “Examine” using a title style Click to edit Masterrange of methods Participant takes regular digital photos or fills out a bookletLogging documenting their activities Participant saves up all their junk mail for two weeks toHomework prompt our discussionStimuli Review wireframes, prototypes, simulations, storyboards What’s in your wallet? What’s in your fridge?Exercises Sketch your idealized solution UXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  8. Ask how they would solve aClick to edit Master title styleproblemParticipatory design Engage people in the non- Doesn’t mean we implement the literal through games and requested solution literally role-playing “I wish it had a handle” Uncover underlying principles Many ways to solve the underlying and explore areas of need (“I need to move it around”) opportunity that don’t yet exist Designers work with this data to generate alternativesUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  9. Show people a solutionClick to edit Master title styleThere’s a difference between testingand exploring Avoid “Do you like this?” Don’t show your best guess at a solution; instead identify provocative examples to surface hidden desires and expectations Image from Roberto and Worth1000.comMake sure you are asking the rightquestions What does this solution enable? What problems does it solve? For new products especially, you need this info before implementation specificsUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  10. Observing pain pointsClick to edit Master title styleWhile we always uncover so-called pain points, biggeropportunities may come from understanding why – how didwe get here?UXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  11. It may not really be title painfulClick to edit Master that styleSatisficing (coined by Herbert Simon in 1956) refers to ouracceptance of good-enough solutionsThese can drive engineers and designers crazy…but thereal problem isn’t always what it appears to beUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  12. Click to edit Master title styleUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  13. Choosing what types of peopleClick to edit Master title style to studyTypically, start with the people youwant to design forAlso consider people who canarticulate a point of view Early adopters, lead users, analogous or adjacent usersTriangulate through multipleperspectives People who haven’t done “it” yet People who stopped doing “it”By creating contrast you reveal key influencing factors thatyou wouldn’t otherwise seeUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  14. The to edit Master teachableClicktechniques are title styleThe UX community offers upa bountiful supply ofwebinars, books, workshops,and conferences to helpdevelop mastery of the tools What tools is your team adept at? What skills do you need to build?UXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  15. But for edit Master title styleClick tomany organizations, this is a cultural shiftA shift in what we think the customer’s problem is Are we open to uncovering other problems?A shift in what we think the solution is Are we open to considering other solutions? Is your organization committed to creating the kinds of experiences people are seeking?We must be comfortable with ambiguity How tolerant are you with not knowing the answer at different points in the process? How tolerant are you for qualitative data and its rich stories and insights?UXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  16. Stories edit Master title styleClick to make culture change happenTo start a culture change we need to do two simple things:1. Do dramatic story-worthy things that represent theculture we want to create. Then let other people tell storiesabout it.2. Find other people who do story-worthy things thatrepresent the culture we want to create. Then tell storiesabout them.We can change our stories and be changed by them. From A Good Way to Change a Corporate Culture, Peter Bregman, HBR blogUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  17. Make the case (for title styleClick to edit Master outcomes, not process)Don’t lead with “We have to talkto customers!”First investigate to understand What information does the team need to do their work? Do they have that information? What has been tried? What worked? What didn’t work? Why?Your recommended approachmust be rooted in that context.Your emphasis is on solving thebusiness problem.UXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  18. Prochaska Master title styleClick to edit& Diclemente’s Stages of ChangeImage: @symplicit and @jodiemouleUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  19. Diagnose, then target responseClick to edit Master title styleTactics: http://www.cellinteractive.com/ucla/physcian_ed/stages_change.htmlImage: @symplicit and @jodiemouleUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  20. “Research” Master title styleClick to edit playing nicely with “design” Understand CreateUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  21. “Research” Master title styleClick to edit playing nicely with “design” Create Understand Create Create CreateUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  22. “Research” Master title styleClick to edit playing nicely with “design” Understand Create Understand Create Understand Create Understand CreateUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  23. Make ideation part title styleClick to edit Masterof researchUXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  24. Consider resources Click to edit Master title style 2-3 weeks 2-3 weeks 2-3 weeks Who do you What do you Do want to talk want to do Fieldwork something to? with them? with the data! Screening Methodology, Interviews, self- Analysis,criteria, recruiting field guide, reporting, synthesis, design stimuli debriefs Educate others what it takes to accomplish this. Resistance may be based on naïve assumptions (e.g., seeing “every” customer). UXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  25. When time Master title styleClick to editis a constraint 1 day?! 1 day?! 2 days?!!Who do you What do you Dowant to talk want to do Fieldwork something to? with them? with the data! Who can you Wide-eyed Small sample, Debriefget? Co-workers, observation, massivelyintercepts on the winging it parallel data street or in the gathering mall, etc. Make your stakeholders aware of tradeoffs. Develop expertise in project planning and propose the right-size approach.UXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  26. Cultural insights drive culture Click to edit Master title style change & innovationEven in re-creating anordinary task, a concernabout being “rude”Latent behavior thatparticipant was barelyaware ofRevealed crucialframework that drovebiggest opportunities forour client – even if theywere unwilling toacknowledge them at first UXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  27. Coming up!Click to edit Master title style A book by Steve Portigal The Art and Craft of User Research Interviewing http://rosenfeldmedia.com/books/user-interviews/ Share your fieldwork War Stories http://www.portigal.com/series/WarStories/UXLX @steveportigal Portigal
  28. Click to edit Master title styleThank you!Portigal Consulting @steveportigalwww.portigal.com steve@portigal.com UXLX @steveportigal +1-415-894-2001 Portigal

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