MMU Presentation on the live energy challenge

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  • MMU Presentation on the live energy challenge

    1. 1. Persuade. Engage. Delight.Live energy data and behavioural change
    2. 2. A dismal display-Live energy displays are in their infancy.-Display screens are creatively rudimentary: graphs, charts, statistics and garish colours tend to dominate.-They are unlikely to appeal to its busy staff and student populations who will need to obtain information at-a-glance, in foyers whilst waiting for the lift.
    3. 3. Superfluous information Impenetrable chartClumsy call to action
    4. 4. Lucid Design Group-The best example we have found is Lucid’s Building Dashboard-Makes energy and water use visible in real time on the web.-It also encompasses social networks, weather forecasts, environmental tips and pledges.
    5. 5. Energy and water useIn real timeOn the web+Profile pagesReal-time competitions+Apps!Set up budgetsWeather forecastsand more Widgets+Connect to social networksBrowse calendars of eventsExplore photos of greenbuilding features+Animated data-enabledillustrations of renewableenergy and water systems+Green tips for resourceconservation.
    6. 6. Manchester DigitalDevelopment Agency-Live energy display experiment at Manchester Art Gallery.-Manchester Art Gallery currently gains 400,000 visitors each year and is owned and run by Manchester City Council.-Between 1998 and 2002, it underwent a £35million refurbishment, but under EU Energy Performance of Buildings Directive, the gallery is rated G.
    7. 7. Project-Small display screen by the lift call button.-The aim was to encourage staff to use the stairs rather than the lift.-The screen displayed the cost of energy used by lift trips the day before.-Not too aggressive, as some users may not physically be able to use the stairs.
    8. 8. Results-At first staff engaged and chose the stairs.-Screen did not change interface or information, barring the actual figure, staff soon became accustomed to its presence.-After two weeks it was essentially ignored.-Second pilot at the gallery used happy and sad face icons in kitchen to convey whether energy use had increased or decreased.-This was found to be more successful.
    9. 9. Learnings-No change in behaviour if not used alongside a wider information campaign.-Results on screen will be more affective with savings rather than costs.-Simple graphics are infinitely better than complicated graphs.-If comparing days, historic like for like comparisons average out any anomalies, i.e compare against the last 12 Tuesdays rather than just last Tuesday.
    10. 10. MMU Focus Group-Members of the MMU staff and student populations who had a level of interest.-Participants were asked whether Creative Concern could continue to consult with them on further, developed ideas, and they confirmed that they could.
    11. 11. Energy diaries-Kettle (all day) -Heating -Water cooling-Lift -Cooling -Dishwasher-Microwave -Lights -Fans-Radio -Toilets -Laminators-Photocopier, -PCs and servers -Simulation printer etc. equipment -Projectors-Washing up -Toaster -Kiln-Automatic doors -CCTV-Hand drier -Phone calls
    12. 12. Energy personalities
    13. 13. Fear of Look cool penalties Prizes! Latest gizmos Team spiritCompetitive Need support Reputation Pressure from users Time Funding pressures cuts
    14. 14. Ideas for energy displays-Groups were given a set of cue cards showcasing how the live energy displays might convey their messages.-Participants were asked about the methods that spoke most to them, and which they disliked most.
    15. 15. Character-based-One group disliked stats and felt characters were a great antidote.-Message should be simple – ‘today we are performing better than yesterday’.-Fun and would keep the attention of building users.-Imagined a polar bear dying as energy consumption increases! One group disliked this idea – we’re not children!
    16. 16. Graphs and charts-One group really liked graphs and numerical measurements.-Transparent and, providing it was simplified, accessible.-However, they should track more ‘fun’, accessible things, like ‘food miles travelled this week in the canteen’
    17. 17. Colour & audio-One group really liked the idea of a wall of colour, or lights that changed colour according to how well the building and its inhabitants were performing.-Another group really liked the idea of audio as it is difficult to ignore and more inclusive for partially sighted and blind building users.-Perhaps the audio could be triggered by sensors?
    18. 18. Other ideas...-Comparisons between buildings? Can be done using percentages and targets. Friendly competition!-Fun theory – we need to be getting people to change their behaviour without really thinking about it.-Why does it have to be a screen? Why not a physical thing? A cuckoo clock or barometer.
    19. 19. -Why not the energy Olympic games? Each month of 2012, building users compete against each other in a different ‘game’.-Or physical games, like the ones you’d get at the seaside where you’d roll the balls and your horse would move along.
    20. 20. What can we do different?Persuasive designCompetition worksEmotionally connectBig numbers-AND-The bigger picture
    21. 21. Three routes
    22. 22. @headstretcher

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