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1
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015
Quick outline of the workshop. Somewhere in there we’ll have a break!
The aim of this workshop is not getting everyone on ...
Let’s start with context.
There seems to be a new punch line in academia: Publish or Perish has become Be
Visible or Vanis...
Goodier and Czerniewicz adapted the functional building blocks of social media (‘Social
media? Get serious! Understanding ...
There are two broad categories of online content to consider when talking about your
online presence
- digital footprint i...
One – look at your current digital footprint. Yes people, this means googling yourself
once in a while.
It is also useful ...
If you already do regular searches for your own name, your results in Google will be
influenced by your previous searches ...
Two: decide on what you want.
As we’ve already learnt, there are many social networks around which cater to
researchers an...
Let these questions guide you along.
Big tip: make sure you use the platforms that your university has on offer. Number 1:...
3 is all about ‘Improving your outputs’ availability’
This is about making your scholarly outputs reach as many people as ...
Once you got the basics, it is time to start communicating and interacting. And I cannot
stress enough that both aspects a...
And that brings us to step 2: understand the principles of good communication – so you
can apply these to Twitter too.
Est...
How I see it, to take you to the next level you need to look for productive interactions.
Choose tools that fit your chara...
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 14
Before I turn to the wide array of tools at your disposal I would like to turn your
attention to a useful competence in yo...
TOOLS
And let’s stress again: RE-USE CONTENT BUT ADAPT TO AIM AND TARGET AUDIENCE
Many more but these are relevant to scie...
http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsereviewofbooks/category/disciplines/media-studies/
- Blog: separate, group, guest
- Explanimation...
Part of this workshop is also allowing full disclosure.
Is social media a waste of time?
Is it dangerous? Will it hurt you...
Timing and complementarity are everything in social media but what about the actual
impact – scientific and otherwise?
For...
ALTMETRICS > An umbrella term for spectrum of social media-based metrics:
- often proposed as alternative to citation-base...
Also, questions are raised about a certain bias. A bias in topics: do social media only pay
attention to the sex, drugs an...
Besides the obvious benefits:
- Connect with peers and building a scholarly network. Quote: “It’s allowed me to open
up ne...
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 22
There’re great benefits to integrating social media into your research – not just as a way
to communicate but also as a me...
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 24
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 25
Twitter can be a lot of fun and be an added value if you find the right use for you and
your aims
But those might not be t...
Building blocks of Twitter
27
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015
But first: what technology?
• Twitter clients: Twitter, Hootsuite, Tweetdeck, Tweetbot > app or web-based
• Schedulers: Ho...
Account:
- Accounts can be closed down due to inactivity. Inactivity is based on a combination of
tweeting, logging in, an...
Closed account: same thing (defeats the purpose of Twitter)
Advertise your account: e-mail signature, conference name tag,...
Twitter accounts for individual researchers
Let’s improve them together
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 J...
Twitter accounts for research groups
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 31
Settings
- Keeping it manageable and learning from activity
- Privacy
- Notifications (e-mail address)
- Twitter Archive
E...
Now it’s time for the real work:
- Building up your network by following and being followed
- Start tweeting
In both cases...
Importance of a good bio
Odd followers and bots: it happens
@tweetyourscience database
http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsoci...
of Tweets from only the users on that list.
Lists are used for reading Tweets only. You cannot send or direct a Tweet to
m...
Language of your tweets
Individual tweets are being displayed with larger font and a new font face, while your
thumbnail i...
Visual works!
By the way, a picture takes up valuable space in a timeline, esp. on a smartphone.
Some of @ResearchUGent’s ...
Disclaimer: often depends on twitter client
REPLY AND MENTION
- Visiting another user's profile page on Twitter will not d...
interesting before you start sending a barrage of Twitter replies. (of course, no DM
is possible to multiple contacts)
TWI...
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 38
Blue Line versus View Conversation
On Twitter web as well as its Android and iOS apps the tweets that form part of a
conve...
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 40
41
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015
Favourite
Correcting mistakes:
- Second tweet
- Never mind (life span)
- Replying: thin blue line and #correction
- Deleti...
Get to know the habits of your followers and influencers!
It might pay off to have a schedule and a list of possible tweet...
1. Your followers are reacting: you should be able to see a reaction ripple
through your feed.
2. Your number of followers...
Some examples analysed
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 45
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 46
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 47
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 48
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 49
Brings us back to the start
All about knowing yourself
Finding the right balance
So have fun but keep it real!
50
Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015 51
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Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science
workshop - 1 July 2015
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Using Twitter to enhance your research impact

Presentation for workshop at #zegteens #letstalkscience (Science Communication Summer School 1-3 July 2015)

Using Twitter to enhance your research impact

  1. 1. 1 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  2. 2. Quick outline of the workshop. Somewhere in there we’ll have a break! The aim of this workshop is not getting everyone on Twitter. What I want to do is provide you with the necessary information on context and on using Twitter so you can decide whether to join the blue bird community. If you’re not convinced you will not be able to keep it up. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 2
  3. 3. Let’s start with context. There seems to be a new punch line in academia: Publish or Perish has become Be Visible or Vanish. From funding to citations to digital footprint and media exposure: research seems to be about getting noticed and making an impact. And this is more than having a high H- index – which is an indicator for scholarly impact based on publications and citations. But science is of course so much more than this. It pays to consider who are the real stakeholders of science and how this affects the way you work. Something we call ‘societal value creation of research’. So the question is: do you work with your door close or open? If you are serious about being a researcher in today’s context of science for society, online academic tools and high impact and visibility, it might be interesting to pay attention to this talk and get a few pointers on how to approach this in a strategic way. A good way to help you along in this environment of high visibility is investing in networking – offline and online. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 3
  4. 4. Goodier and Czerniewicz adapted the functional building blocks of social media (‘Social media? Get serious! Understanding the functional building blocks of social media’ by Jan H. Kietzmann, Kristopher Hermkens , Ian P. McCarthy , Bruno S. Silvestre in Business Horizons, Volume 54, Issue 3, May–June 2011, Pages 241–251) and applied them to what is called ‘the networked scholar’. Central to your attitude as a networked scholar is your identity, and in this case we focus on your online identity - defined as ‘the extent to which others can identify you online as a scholar’. This is why it is critical to become aware of your online presence and to shape and maintain this presence.” And this makes sense when you consider that 7 out of 10 people use online search tools when they look for information on other people. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 4
  5. 5. There are two broad categories of online content to consider when talking about your online presence - digital footprint is your active contribution to and interaction with the online world - digital shadow is content about you posted and uploaded by others, as well as automatically generated and collated content You should try and maximise the former and watch the latter, especially as it is difficult to control. The best way to drown out content about yourself that you may not like is to upload content of your choice. The authors discern 4 steps in this exercise of assessing and improving your online presence. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 5
  6. 6. One – look at your current digital footprint. Yes people, this means googling yourself once in a while. It is also useful to do specific Google searches. You could start with Google Images, Google Videos, Google Books and Google Discussions. You might even set up some Google Alerts. And don’t worry, you’re not the only one doing this. Let these questions help you along. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 6
  7. 7. If you already do regular searches for your own name, your results in Google will be influenced by your previous searches and those of other people, so also do searches for your name in search engines which don’t have this personalisation feature, such as Duckduckgo. Checking up on your scholarly online profile today is all about online tools with publication and citation databases such as Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar. Because of a recent surge in online tools we can now also track the broader impact of scholarly activities: Mendeley (bookmarks of your articles based on URL or DOI), Altmetric (media buzz around your research), Impactstory (linking outputs) and even socialmention. Another interesting thing is OrcID – which provides a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized. Ghent University will be implementing this later this year via Biblio. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 7
  8. 8. Two: decide on what you want. As we’ve already learnt, there are many social networks around which cater to researchers and are truly in use. See recent study by Nature. If there’s one clear rule, it’s that having an online presence is a time commitment. Think about how much time you can commit to keeping your profile(s) current and then decide if you should have just one profile with links from other services, or whether you should replicate your profile on a number of services. In any case, online profiles that are not maintained or updated do not create a good impression. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 8
  9. 9. Let these questions guide you along. Big tip: make sure you use the platforms that your university has on offer. Number 1: keep your academic repository up to date and use this as your starting point. But don’t forget that there’s a world outside academia: it might pay off to create a LinkedIn profile in which you link to your repository. And this is also where Twitter comes in because it balances between academic/professional and personal/outreach. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 9
  10. 10. 3 is all about ‘Improving your outputs’ availability’ This is about making your scholarly outputs reach as many people as possible and making it easily accessible and findable. “While you may publish prolifically, if people can’t discover your content online, they are much less likely to read it.” This step involves assessing what publications and other outputs of yours are already online and then sharing everything else you are able to, including teaching resources and ‘popular or informal’ resources in a variety of formats. This is where the notion of Open Access and Open Science comes in. Science Europe identified three essential aspects of Open science: its relation to digital technology, the idea that ir explores changing research practices and their impact on the research system as a whole, and the fundamental importance of “a certain vision of science as a community of practice”. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 10
  11. 11. Once you got the basics, it is time to start communicating and interacting. And I cannot stress enough that both aspects are equally important. Just broadcasting is not enough (adopt the same attitude as in research: more than publications, also projects and collaborations). Or as Goodier and Czerniewicz say: “While having an online profile on a platform is a first step, in order to fully interact with others online, you need to engage with them.“ Communication and interaction is also key to creating an impact. There are many types of societal value creation of research – a whole smorgasbord to unleash your creativity, fit for your kind of research - but that’s another workshop. In this session we must focus on social media and esp. Twitter. With social media you are in effect using media that thrive on interaction. If you just broadcast what a great researcher you are you will not be able to reap the full benefits of what these media have to offer. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 11
  12. 12. And that brings us to step 2: understand the principles of good communication – so you can apply these to Twitter too. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 12
  13. 13. How I see it, to take you to the next level you need to look for productive interactions. Choose tools that fit your character, your talents and your research. Re-use all this scientific and non-scientific knowledge that you’re amassing but be sure to adapt it to fit your specific aim and tailor it to your audience. PRODUCTIVE INTERACTIONS means looking for partners within your university. - Communication Office - Unit for Science Communication - Research Communication (incl. scholarly communication) - Faculty Communication - Dedicated person with research group It also means identifying external stakeholders: - Of your research: general public and specific target groups - Of your communication: media When it comes to social media: FIND YOUR INFLUENCERS (people that can act as your megaphone) Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 13
  14. 14. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 14
  15. 15. Before I turn to the wide array of tools at your disposal I would like to turn your attention to a useful competence in your bag of communication tricks. STORY-BOARDING – why not try story-boarding your research project? • It helps envision, or picture in miniature, and long in advance, a finished product. • Storyboarding is a kind of low-cost prototyping, a way of making more concrete what will happen. • Because concepts are fleshed out and made concrete in an accessible way, a storyboard can help generate resources and commitment from external source. • The storyboard (and later the screenplay) generate a detailed, common vision that can be shared early on by many different actors in complex production teams. Link: https://medium.com/advice-and-help-in-authoring-a-phd-or-non-fiction/story- boarding-research-b430cebd5ccd STORY-TELLING – that in turn will help when you try your hand at story-telling. The risks that come with communicating your research to wide audiences are great. Rigorous researching and attention-grabbing storytelling are very different trades. However, by finding that point of connection in your research and by maintaining control of your media relationships, you will be better placed at mitigating those risks. Link: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2014/08/27/academic-storytelling- risk-reduction/ Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 15
  16. 16. TOOLS And let’s stress again: RE-USE CONTENT BUT ADAPT TO AIM AND TARGET AUDIENCE Many more but these are relevant to science - Website: profile page but more importantly, news items - LinkedIn: profile outside academia - Visual platforms: Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest - In between visual and blog: Tumblr (E.g. Congrats – you’ve got an all male panel! And Academic Bird Watching http://errantscience.tumblr.com/post/116460277480/birds- of-academia-an-often-hard-to-spot-selection) - Commenting - Reddit Science - Ik heb een vraag - Opinion pieces for all kinds of media - Wikipedia as a means to open up science: https://blog.wikimedia.org.uk/2014/10/using-wikipedia-to-open-up-science/ - Data visualisation - Infographics: http://blogs.biomedcentral.com/bmcblog/2014/08/11/the-power-of- pictures-how-we-can-use-images-to-promote-and-communicate-science/ > the importance of visuals (academic poster becomes infographic) - Twitter - Online book reviews including popular books based on science: 16 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  17. 17. http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsereviewofbooks/category/disciplines/media-studies/ - Blog: separate, group, guest - Explanimation: e.g. Crash Course Biology https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3EED4C1D684D3ADF > Choose your audience / Deliver in style / Stay focused / Get to the point / Be part of the community / Give the audience an anchor / Be a person not a company - Ted talk (start locally with TedX) – Scientists Popularizing Science: characteristics and impact of TED Talk Presenters (PLOSONE April 2013): “Presenters are predominantly male and non-academics. Although TED popularizes research it may not promote the work of scientists within the academic community.” - Podcast Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 16
  18. 18. Part of this workshop is also allowing full disclosure. Is social media a waste of time? Is it dangerous? Will it hurt your career? And I’ll be honest: social media are not the easy way out. Box 1 Box 2 Box 3 Certainly a matter of ‘look before you leap’. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 17
  19. 19. Timing and complementarity are everything in social media but what about the actual impact – scientific and otherwise? For those looking at hard evidence let’s look at the science about science. 1. April 2012: article by Melissa Terras showing increase in downloads after tweets 2. Reminiscent of article by Eysenbach 2011 3. What about blogs? 4. Which led to age-old discussion ‘association is not correlation, which in turn is not causation’ Tweets tend to associate with citations but not correlate > but the more people start tweeting their research the bigger the correlation will get? In any event, interest was sparked and more people were talking about ‘altmetrics’ as the new saviour of science. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 18
  20. 20. ALTMETRICS > An umbrella term for spectrum of social media-based metrics: - often proposed as alternative to citation-based indicators - And as a tool to measure the impact of science outside academia But… “most studies show that, although citations and the new metrics are to some extent positively correlated, these correlations are very weak.” Quote from a recent and very interesting article by scientometricians concluding that at the most, social media metrics may function as complements to other types of indicators and metrics. Some more findings from this same article: (see looking glass and circle) Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 19
  21. 21. Also, questions are raised about a certain bias. A bias in topics: do social media only pay attention to the sex, drugs and rock and roll of science? A bias in broadcasters: social sciences and humanities are the most often found on social media platforms. Or is a matter of shouting the loudest? “Just like a taller, more powerful radio tower will boost a signal so it can be heard at a greater distance; it makes sense that more people will read a paper if the writer is active on social media. Of course, because we wrote it, we think it’s great that our paper has proved so popular, but we have to ask: in the future, will the highest quality papers be read most? Or will it be only those papers backed up by the loudest voices?” - Academic blogging is part of a complex online academic attention economy, leading to unprecedented readership, I. Mewburn and P. Thomson for LSE Impact blog (Dec 2013) Let’s wrap this discussion up with the four words scientists love to hear: more research is needed! In the meantime things are evolving… (see tweet) So let us ask that question again: why should we be interested in social media as a tool for research? Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 20
  22. 22. Besides the obvious benefits: - Connect with peers and building a scholarly network. Quote: “It’s allowed me to open up new communities for discussions and increase the interdisciplinarity of my research.” (A network boost by M. Baker. Nature, 12 Feb 2015) - Reputation management - Dissemination Conferences: - Back-channel: (capture content & provide feedback) share questions and resources - Connecting and networking - Virtual participation - Reading tip: http://www.theguardian.com/higher-education- network/blog/2012/oct/03/ethics-live-tweeting-academic-conferences Jobs & prof. development: - “Following institutions, companies and individuals on Twitter can offer clues about workplace culture and ongoing projects in a way that static website do not.” - “Junior researchers are creating identities that don’t have to be routed through the principal investigator.” (A network boost by M. Baker. Nature, 12 Feb 2015) Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 21
  23. 23. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 22
  24. 24. There’re great benefits to integrating social media into your research – not just as a way to communicate but also as a means to become a better scholar. Although it can be great fun and many of the social media look flighty (eg. half-life of a tweet is 18 minutes) it should not be taken lightly but approached in a strategic and professional manner. It’s all about finding the right balance: - Not overthinking it but using it to your advantage - Getting into the spirit of sharing while keeping focus in your own research and not losing yourself in procrastination - Giving it a natural place in your time management and approaching it so you feel comfortable with it It might even offer you some release to the incessant publication and promotion pressure (although the current academic system is not yet in tune with outreach and online activities) 23 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  25. 25. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 24
  26. 26. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 25
  27. 27. Twitter can be a lot of fun and be an added value if you find the right use for you and your aims But those might not be the aims of your target audience It also adds to information ‘overload’ It does need to be approached with a healthy wariness and self-control “It’s many different things to many different people.” 26 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  28. 28. Building blocks of Twitter 27 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  29. 29. But first: what technology? • Twitter clients: Twitter, Hootsuite, Tweetdeck, Tweetbot > app or web-based • Schedulers: Hootsuite, Buffer • Feed updates • Link shorteners and trackers: Bitly, Owly • Analytics: Twitter Analytics, Twitalyzer, SumAll, twtrland > some examples later on • Filters • Archive: twDocs lets you save Twitter tweets, favorites, mentions, direct messages and search results as PDF, DOC, XML, CSV, TXT, XLS or HTML files. • History: Topsy (get old tweets) • Storify • BlueNod • TwInbox: integrated into MS Outlook 28
  30. 30. Account: - Accounts can be closed down due to inactivity. Inactivity is based on a combination of tweeting, logging in, and the date an account was created. In order to keep an account active, a user needs to log in at least once every six months, or risk permanently losing an account. - An account might appear dead, but someone might be an active reader of other’s tweets. - What’s the underlying e-mail address? (think notifications) User name (handle): User name is not the same as your name: Your username appears in your profile URL and is unique to you. Your name is a personal identifier (sometimes a business name or real name) displayed in your profile page. Use a short Twitter username. Limit to 15 characters cannot contain "admin" or "Twitter“ avoid numbers or underline You want others to be able to remember it and type it easily. You can be anonymous if you wish, but as a researcher it is not recommended: you are more likely to have interesting interactions with others if they know who you are. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 29
  31. 31. Closed account: same thing (defeats the purpose of Twitter) Advertise your account: e-mail signature, conference name tag, other communication media (e.g. twitter wall on website or conference) Changing your username will not affect your existing followers, direct messages, or @replies. Your followers will simply see a new username next to your profile photo when you update. Alert your followers before you change your username so they can direct @replies or direct messages to your new username. Pin a tweet? Decision: sharing the effort through a group account or getting for feet wet with guest tweeting (cf. Realscientists, WetheHums) Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 29
  32. 32. Twitter accounts for individual researchers Let’s improve them together Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 30
  33. 33. Twitter accounts for research groups Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 31
  34. 34. Settings - Keeping it manageable and learning from activity - Privacy - Notifications (e-mail address) - Twitter Archive Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 32
  35. 35. Now it’s time for the real work: - Building up your network by following and being followed - Start tweeting In both cases: focus on quality rather than quantity (flowchart can help but don’t approach this outlet like all other things in academia and turn it into a reputation economy) And yes, you’ll make mistakes but there are always ways to deal with these! It is important to keep learning and not become complacent. 33 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  36. 36. Importance of a good bio Odd followers and bots: it happens @tweetyourscience database http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2011/09/02/academic-tweeters- your-suggestions-in-full/ With time, you'll become adept at discerning who is worth following and who is not. There's no set strategy for this — it's completely up to you and your own personal tastes. It might also depend on your strategy. Twitter etiquette does not require that you follow someone just because they follow you, but following someone is a way of indicating your presence to them. You could also use mentions in the same way. LISTS A list is a curated group of Twitter users. You can create your own lists or subscribe to lists created by others. Viewing a list timeline will show you a stream 34 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  37. 37. of Tweets from only the users on that list. Lists are used for reading Tweets only. You cannot send or direct a Tweet to members of a list, for only those list members to see. You can follow Twitter profiles using lists without actually following their accounts, which means these users aren’t notified that you’re following them. Idea: If you’re going to an event or attended one in the past — add the people associated with the event to a Twitter List. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 34
  38. 38. Language of your tweets Individual tweets are being displayed with larger font and a new font face, while your thumbnail image, name and Twitter handle are actually smaller, bringing the focus on the content of the tweet. And your tweets that are getting particularly high engagement (more favorites, retweets, etc.) will actually be displayed with even larger font to bring further attention to them. Thin and thick tweets (David Silver): one layer of information > more layers 35 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  39. 39. Visual works! By the way, a picture takes up valuable space in a timeline, esp. on a smartphone. Some of @ResearchUGent’s most succesful tweets had visuals. Knowing how many times to tweet per day is a process of trial and error, but that doesn’t mean it’s a matter of blind luck to find that magical number. It’s an ongoing process of refinement. Important: management of expectations More on timing later on. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 36
  40. 40. Disclaimer: often depends on twitter client REPLY AND MENTION - Visiting another user's profile page on Twitter will not display Tweets that mention them. However, you can search for all Tweets mentioning their username in the search box. Search for "@username" to view results. - People will only see others' @replies in their home timeline if they are following both the sender and recipient of the @reply. - People will see any mentions posted by someone they follow (all mentions are treated like regular Tweets). - People with protected Tweets can only send @replies to their approved followers. If someone sends you an @reply and you are not following the user, the reply will not appear on your Tweets timeline. Instead, the reply will appear in your Mentions tab. You can click People you follow at the top of the Mentions timeline to only display mentions from users you are following. It's a good idea to be judicious in your use of the Twitter @ reply button. If you're trying to have a direct conversation with someone, be sure your tweets are 37 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  41. 41. interesting before you start sending a barrage of Twitter replies. (of course, no DM is possible to multiple contacts) TWITTER CANOE If you’ve been @-mentioned in a conversation on Twitter that mentions a lot of other users and that doesn't stop until the people involved run out of things to say, congratulations! You’ve been roped into a Twitter canoe. A canoe is a conversation on Twitter that keeps rolling and adding new people until people get annoyed or bored and stop talking to each other. Adding yourself to a Twitter canoe is a bit of a bold move—etiquette calls for someone to add you first. SUBTWEETING and TWEETSTORMS > CODE of CONDUCT DIRECT MESSAGE Direct Messages are private messages sent from one Twitter user to other Twitter users. You can use Direct Messages to communicate privately with a single person or with a group of people. • You can start a conversation with anyone who follows you. • Some accounts, including businesses, have enabled a setting to receive Direct Messages from anyone. You can send a Direct Message to these users even if they don’t follow you. • There is an account limit of 1,000 Direct Messages sent per day. Blue Line versus View Conversation On Twitter web as well as its Android and iOS apps the tweets that form part of a conversation are displayed connected by a blue line. This makes conversations much easier to follow right from the timeline itself without having to go to a tweet's permanent URL. This means that if you have something to say that cannot be contained within the confines of a single tweet, split them up into logical sentences, post the first sentence(s) and then reply to that tweet using the reply button, remove the @mention and then put in the second sentence(s), follow the same procedure for subsequent tweets. Also, if a conversation started an hour ago, but the latest tweet was sent 38 seconds ago, the whole conversation is going to appear at the top of your timeline. Blue line: if you follow people involved in conversation View conversation: if retweeted (so people you don’t follow) Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 37
  42. 42. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 38
  43. 43. Blue Line versus View Conversation On Twitter web as well as its Android and iOS apps the tweets that form part of a conversation are displayed connected by a blue line. This makes conversations much easier to follow right from the timeline itself without having to go to a tweet's permanent URL. This means that if you have something to say that cannot be contained within the confines of a single tweet, split them up into logical sentences, post the first sentence(s) and then reply to that tweet using the reply button, remove the @mention and then put in the second sentence(s), follow the same procedure for subsequent tweets. Also, if a conversation started an hour ago, but the latest tweet was sent 38 seconds ago, the whole conversation is going to appear at the top of your timeline. Blue line: if you follow people involved in conversation View conversation: if retweeted (so people you don’t follow) 39
  44. 44. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 40
  45. 45. 41 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  46. 46. Favourite Correcting mistakes: - Second tweet - Never mind (life span) - Replying: thin blue line and #correction - Deleting a tweet: Please note that you can only delete Tweets that you have made, you cannot delete other users' Tweets from your timeline. Deleted Tweets sometimes hang out in Twitter search, they will clear with time. Timing is everything (reason why I rarely use scheduled tweets) And some people just cannot be helped… Don’t mix up accounts (easily done in Hootsuite) and don’t use shortcuts (eg ‘d’ for direct message) Try to come up with a witty approach to making mistakes but don’t make it worse! Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 42
  47. 47. Get to know the habits of your followers and influencers! It might pay off to have a schedule and a list of possible tweets. HALF LIFE: http://www.socialmediacontractors.com/half-life-tweet/ 43 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  48. 48. 1. Your followers are reacting: you should be able to see a reaction ripple through your feed. 2. Your number of followers is steadily and naturally growing. If your follower numbers are falling, tweet less; if they’re static, tweet more. 3. The right people are seeing and responding to your tweets. Connect with the influencers. 4. You treat Twitter interactions differently than promotions. If you are using your Twitter account strictly as a promotional channel, people will treat it as such. 5. Your posts yield real results. 44 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015
  49. 49. Some examples analysed Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 45
  50. 50. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 46
  51. 51. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 47
  52. 52. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 48
  53. 53. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 49
  54. 54. Brings us back to the start All about knowing yourself Finding the right balance So have fun but keep it real! 50
  55. 55. Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015 51
  56. 56. 52 Esther De Smet - Let's Talk Science workshop - 1 July 2015

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