Facing the future:
Round-up and overview

Stephen Town
Director of Information
University of York
Round-up
•
•
•
•

Strategic challenges and tactical responses
The value proposition
Working together
Bargaining
Speakers’ points: a selection 1
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Gary:
David:
David:
Martin:
Martin:
Martin:
Martin:

“vendor management”
“v...
Speakers’ points: a selection 2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Martin:
Martin:
Tony:
Tony:
Tony:
Sally:
Sally:

“brand driven use”
“open a...
Speakers’ points: a selection 3
• Sally:
•
•
•
•
•
•

Sally:
Sally:
Sally:
Sally:
Sally:
Sally:

“sustainable
expenditure”...
Lessons from the past?
• Avoid “lose-lose” situations
• Don’t get caught in the middle: “blameblame”
• Neither “fight” nor...
Cost and Value

“focusing on cost without being able to
demonstrate [service] value and quality …
leaves the initiative to...
Strategy or tactics: the context
•
•
•
•
•

Resource inflation greater than growth
Service development demands
Quality and...
Conclusions 1
• Costs must be controlled
– Individually
– Institutionally
– Collectively

• Purchase choice must shift to ...
Conclusions 2
• Maximising return
– Better awareness
– Active exploitation
– Intermediate guidance

• Minimising overheads...
Questions?
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Facing the future: round-up and overview

  1. 1. Facing the future: Round-up and overview Stephen Town Director of Information University of York
  2. 2. Round-up • • • • Strategic challenges and tactical responses The value proposition Working together Bargaining
  3. 3. Speakers’ points: a selection 1 • • • • • • • Gary: David: David: Martin: Martin: Martin: Martin: “vendor management” “value proposition” “fair pricing” “access benefits” “complex reality” “use price” “value for money”
  4. 4. Speakers’ points: a selection 2 • • • • • • • Martin: Martin: Tony: Tony: Tony: Sally: Sally: “brand driven use” “open access” 11:38 “competitive concerns” “collaborative working” “reduced overheads” “no certainty” “content imbalance”
  5. 5. Speakers’ points: a selection 3 • Sally: • • • • • • Sally: Sally: Sally: Sally: Sally: Sally: “sustainable expenditure” “finding failures” “new activities” “library rethink” “special differentiation” “value presentation” “relevant indicators”
  6. 6. Lessons from the past? • Avoid “lose-lose” situations • Don’t get caught in the middle: “blameblame” • Neither “fight” nor “flight” reaction • Don’t reward negative behaviours • Failure to influence scholarly communication at any point? Giving it all away? • Collecting counter-productive evidence?
  7. 7. Cost and Value “focusing on cost without being able to demonstrate [service] value and quality … leaves the initiative to people whose chief concern is cost-control or profit: the funders and the vendors” Whitehall, T (1995)
  8. 8. Strategy or tactics: the context • • • • • Resource inflation greater than growth Service development demands Quality and expectation demands Competitive differentiation? Low staff inflation
  9. 9. Conclusions 1 • Costs must be controlled – Individually – Institutionally – Collectively • Purchase choice must shift to value – Quantitative measures insufficient – Qualitative evaluation critical to debate – Understanding of new user behaviours
  10. 10. Conclusions 2 • Maximising return – Better awareness – Active exploitation – Intermediate guidance • Minimising overheads – – – – Licensing, compliance and bureaucracy Active engagement with publishers at all levels Charging back for University contributions Managing expectations
  11. 11. Questions?

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