How To Run A Pitch
    Stephen Greensted
       4 June 2010


     http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
Before The Pitch Brief
• Research your potential new client and the
  market
• Select a team comprised of the best
  peopl...
The Pitch Briefing
• Be on time. Do not be late. Look clean and
  tidy. Do not chew gum. First impressions
  are very impo...
The Day After The Briefing

• Get the team together, and read through
  the brief together. Remember to turn over
  the pa...
More Information, Please
• There’s a good chance that Procurement
  is going to be very important. Go to see
  them and fi...
Is It On Brief?
• At the minimum, your pitch must be on
  brief. You can go beyond the brief if you’re
  feeling lucky, bu...
Client Relations

• Do not go silent between briefing and
  pitching. Stay in touch with the client
• Try out ideas. Tissu...
The Pitch
• Get to know who the people will be in the
  pitch, and get to know them well
• Is the idea on brief? If yes, p...
Your Team
• Only take to a pitch people who will work
  on the business
• Everyone on the team should have a
  speaking ro...
Your Fee Proposal
• No waffling. Procurement will not want to
  know that you interrogate social trends.
  Use plain Engli...
Summing Up
• This is sometimes called Hurry Up. Your
  pitch should never exceed 90 minutes
• Quickly remind the clients o...
If You Win

• Be generous in your praise of your team
• Everyone else will hate them, but it will
  make them more competi...
Horrors I Have Seen
• During the pitch for Ross Frozen
  Foods, our bearded creative director fell
  asleep. On awakening ...
Horrors As a Client
• During a pitch for Viners Cutlery, I
  watched from the client side a well-known
  PR agency from Co...
Client Bad Behaviour
• Clients can be pretty awful, too
• The Maxell tape pitch should have ended
  in court
• But just re...
My Thanks To

• Wendy Proctor, Head of Client Team, COI
• Rob Wilson, European Marketing
  Director, Seiko,
• Alan Bishop,...
http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
stephen@thegreenstedconsultancy.co.uk
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How To Run A Pitch

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Simple advice to avoid common pitch killers

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How To Run A Pitch

  1. 1. How To Run A Pitch Stephen Greensted 4 June 2010 http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  2. 2. Before The Pitch Brief • Research your potential new client and the market • Select a team comprised of the best people for the job rather than people doing their best • Make sure this team has the capacity to look after the new client if you win • Appoint a pitch leader http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  3. 3. The Pitch Briefing • Be on time. Do not be late. Look clean and tidy. Do not chew gum. First impressions are very important • It’s the start of a job interview, so do not waffle, argue amongst yourselves, or reminisce • Do not criticise the pitch process • Be enthusiastic and cheerful • Ask questions http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  4. 4. The Day After The Briefing • Get the team together, and read through the brief together. Remember to turn over the page (this is not a joke, I have seen this) • If you are pitching with other offices, send them the brief and go through it with them on a conference call • Start planning now http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  5. 5. More Information, Please • There’s a good chance that Procurement is going to be very important. Go to see them and find out what exactly they are expecting to get for their money • Take them seriously, and remember they do not see you as added value. You are a Cost • Ask the client if you can meet some sales people. They’ll be flattered and will help http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  6. 6. Is It On Brief? • At the minimum, your pitch must be on brief. You can go beyond the brief if you’re feeling lucky, but only if you’ve answered the brief first • Unless asked, only comment on the running of a potential client’s business if: – It’s requested in the brief – You’re qualified to comment – You make clear that it is just your opinion http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  7. 7. Client Relations • Do not go silent between briefing and pitching. Stay in touch with the client • Try out ideas. Tissue meetings are often helpful. Get the client to own some of your ideas • Make your potential client feel wanted. Be hungry, and let the client know http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  8. 8. The Pitch • Get to know who the people will be in the pitch, and get to know them well • Is the idea on brief? If yes, pitch. If not, hmm, how did you get this far? • Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse • Have a central idea which needs no explanation • Use only relevant case histories • Never argue amongst yourselves in a pitch, and do not chew gum http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  9. 9. Your Team • Only take to a pitch people who will work on the business • Everyone on the team should have a speaking role. Five is enough: – MD. Creative Director. Planning Director. Account Director. Either Account Handler or Project Manager • It is yours and the account director’s job to check that you have answered the brief http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  10. 10. Your Fee Proposal • No waffling. Procurement will not want to know that you interrogate social trends. Use plain English. They will • Be absolutely clear about how you arrived at your fee proposal. Procurement people can smell bullshit on the other side of the planet. Honesty tends to take them unawares, which they rather like http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  11. 11. Summing Up • This is sometimes called Hurry Up. Your pitch should never exceed 90 minutes • Quickly remind the clients of the brief, your brilliant idea, and the utter splendour of your team, invite questions, and then sit down and listen • You’ll know soon enough how the pitch went http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  12. 12. If You Win • Be generous in your praise of your team • Everyone else will hate them, but it will make them more competitive • Profusely thank the client, and get to work quickly. You are now a long way ahead of the game, so use this advantage ruthlessly to get things done http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  13. 13. Horrors I Have Seen • During the pitch for Ross Frozen Foods, our bearded creative director fell asleep. On awakening and in a moment of fuggy confusion, he fulsomely praised Findus, Ross’ arch enemy. Result: four week’s frantic work up in smoke • During a pitch for British Midland early one morning, our new business lady walked into the room in a silver lamé minidress, still stoned from the night before http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  14. 14. Horrors As a Client • During a pitch for Viners Cutlery, I watched from the client side a well-known PR agency from Covent Garden’s Longacre committing suicide. The pitch was delivered to five female clients and me. The account director wore fishnet tights, a miniskirt, a low cut top, and chewed gum. My female clients wouldn’t even discuss the pitch http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  15. 15. Client Bad Behaviour • Clients can be pretty awful, too • The Maxell tape pitch should have ended in court • But just remember this: Clients have the money, which is what you want. • So, just put up with it, and do your best as honestly and as cheerfully as you can – And without chewing gum http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  16. 16. My Thanks To • Wendy Proctor, Head of Client Team, COI • Rob Wilson, European Marketing Director, Seiko, • Alan Bishop, CEO, The Southbank Centre • Libby Child, CEO, Aprais • Michelle Zuther, Oneida UK http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com
  17. 17. http://stephengreensted.wordpress.com stephen@thegreenstedconsultancy.co.uk

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