Social change marketing in the age of direct benefit marketing – where to from here?

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Social change marketing in the age of direct benefit marketing – where to from here?

A paper exploring the impact of the changes to the social marketing discipline as a result of the AMA (2004) marketing definition shifting significantly away from the previous frameworks established by the AMA (1985) definition.
Reference: Dann, S (2005) "Social change marketing in the age of direct benefit marketing – where to from here?" Social Change in the 21st Century, QUT Carseldine 28 October 2005.

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  • thanq its really nice and useful to me in thinking about invention comes along with think of that.... really nice function.... tanq for this.....
    Sharika
    http://winkhealth.com http://financewink.com
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Social change marketing in the age of direct benefit marketing – where to from here?

  1. 2. Social change marketing in the age of direct benefit marketing – where to from here? Dr Stephen Dann AMPR, QUT
  2. 3. Social Change Marketing Setting the table: Defining the parameters of Social Marketing
  3. 4. Social Marketing Defined <ul><li>Social marketing is the design, implementation, and control of programs calculated to influence the acceptability of product planning, pricing, communication, distribution and marketing research. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(Kotler and Zaltman, 1971) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>&quot;the application of commercial marketing technologies to the analysis, planning, execution, and evaluation of programs designed to influence the voluntary behaviour of target audiences in order to improve their personal welfare and that of their society.“ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(Andreasen, 1995) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ the use of marketing principles and techniques to influence a target audience to voluntarily accept, reject, modify, or abandon a behaviour for the benefit of individuals, groups or society as a whole.” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kotler, Roberto and Lee (2002) </li></ul></ul>
  4. 5. Social versus Commercial Smaller Acceptable marketshares (eg 35%) Unrealistic marketshare expectations Clearly definable benefits from products Uncertain benefits from products Decisions made on ROI or profit imperative Decisions influenced by political imperatives Relationships based on competition Relationships based on trust Hierarchical decision making Participative decision marketing Risk-accepting management Risk-averse management Choose most accessible low risk target Often choose high-risk, hard to reach targets Targets non-controversial behaviours, Often targets controversial behaviours Short term behavioural goal Long term behavioural goal easily measured hard to measure due to uncertain outcomes Privately accountable to shareholders Publicly accountable Funded by investments Funded by taxes and donations Want to make money Want to do good Commercial Marketers Social Marketers
  5. 6. Commercial Marketing Redefined <ul><li>[Marketing is] an organizational function and a set of processes for creating, communicating and delivering value to customers and for managing customer relationships in ways that benefit the organization and its stakeholders. (AMA 2004). </li></ul>
  6. 7. The Change <ul><li>Summary of the Changes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Function and Process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create, Communicate and Deliver Value </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Managing the relationship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Direct Benefits to Organisation & Stakeholder </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The End of Exchange </li></ul></ul>
  7. 8. The Impact benefit the organisation and its stakeholders to improve [target audiences’ member's] personal welfare and that of their society for the benefit of individuals, groups or society as a whole Outcome delivering value to customers, managing customer relationships influence voluntary behaviour of target audiences to influence a target audience to voluntarily accept, reject, modify, or abandon a behaviour Payload creating, communicating and delivering value analysis, planning execution and evaluation of programs n/a Process organisational function and a set of processes application of commercial marketing techniques the use of marketing principles and techniques Method Marketing2004 Social Marketing 1995 Social Marketing 2002
  8. 9. Outcome: Personal / Societal Welfare versus Organisational /Stakeholder Benefit <ul><li>… .influence the voluntary behaviour of target audiences in order to improve their personal welfare and that of their society.&quot; (Andreasen, 1995) </li></ul><ul><li>“… for the benefit of individuals, groups or society as a whole.” (Kotler 2002). </li></ul><ul><li>… for managing customer relationships in ways that benefit the organization and its stakeholders. (AMA 2004). </li></ul>
  9. 10. Outcome Conflict <ul><li>primary aim of social marketing is individual and societal gain. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Andreasen (1995) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kotler, Roberto and Lee (2002) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Direct benefit to an organisation undertaking a social change activity has historically been recognised as societal marketing </li></ul>
  10. 11. Fundamental Mismatch <ul><li>Under the 1985 definition of commercial marketing, “return” is the &quot;exchanges that satisfy individual and organisational objectives, allowing social marketing to deliver improved welfare (individual objective) through behavioural change (organisational objective)”. </li></ul><ul><li>Individual and societal improvements are not direct benefits to the organisation, even where the social changes meet the organisational goals </li></ul><ul><li>social marketing does not currently purport to accept direct benefit to the social change campaigner as a measure of social marketing </li></ul>
  11. 12. Where to from here? <ul><li>Overthrow the new definition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alliance of Kotler, Andreasen and Macromarketing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Adapt to direct benefit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Absorb societal marketing into the ranks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allow for-profit incursions into social change </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Renegade Marketing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Set a new definition of social marketing that does not draw on the AMA’s commercial marketing definition </li></ul></ul>

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