Project Proposal

1,085 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, News & Politics
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,085
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Project Proposal

  1. 1. Social security  (new content starts at 29)  Alex Lambert 
  2. 2. #1: “Thank the Spammers”  William James is an anD‐spam acDvist. In 2003, he wrote an  essay, “Thank the Spammers”, about abuse of Internet  resources:  “Then came the spammers. Because they abused the relays,  like they abuse everything else, the relays had to be turned  off. They found that they could abuse the relays and cost  others hundreds or even thousands of dollars, but it  prevented them from losing the $10 dialup account or free  NetZero account…Old soVware which ran perfectly well had  to be replaced just to close the hole…Yeah, thank the  spammers for that.”  He submiZed to the FTC’s Spam Forum a  list of 29 opportuniDes he feels “the spammers have  ruined” 
  3. 3. So what?  “Thank the spammers” is a cop‐out.  This mess is really our  (engineers’) fault.  We created an e‐mail system that  provided incredible incenDves for  abuse. We completely failed to  consider the economic issue of  how (ab)users would respond to  these incenDves.  I’m not saying the spammers are  without fault; that’s absurd. I’m  saying the system provided  aZracDve opportuniDes, and we  shouldn’t be surprised that  spammers took advantage of  those opportuniDes. 
  4. 4. #2: From my inbox  From: Bruce Pacheco <represent@cliffvalleyschool.org>  Date: Wed, Jun 27, 2007 at 8:56 AM  Subject: Nie mehr zu frueh kommen?  Nimm die Pille, sei kein Dummer, sonst schaffst du nie 'ne gute Nummer!  Meinung von unserem Kunden:  Viagra wirkt Wunder! Sie ahnen nicht, wie glücklich ich bin. Viagra hat  mein Leben verändert. Endlich keine Angst mehr wegen der ErrekDon.  Und auch das Problem mit dem vorzeiDgen Samenerguss ist weg.  Lust über zwei Stunden nicht zu kommen?  I don’t speak German, and I don’t need Viagra. I regularly get spam  wriZen in Chinese and Russian. 
  5. 5. So what?  This message was part of a completely  untargeted blast.  Spamming is becoming more expensive (or, at  least, we’re trying to make it more expensive.)  As this happens, you can expect to see beZer  targeDng and messaging. (I’ve seen  adverDsements for lists of doctors’ addresses.)  So we’re just seeing the infancy of spam right  now. This is scary. 
  6. 6. #3: From Facebook  From: Facebook <wallmaster@facebookmail.com>  Date: Thu, Aug 7, 2008 at 4:02 PM  Subject: Laurie Caires wrote on your Wall…  Laurie wrote on your Wall:  quot;HEY I JUST GOT MYSELF A FREE PS‐3    THE STEPS ARE EASY THIS IS SO COOL!    ALL YOU GUYS  HAVE TO DO IS SIGN UP BELOW    hZp://img515.imageshack.us/img515/7760/gouar8.swf     GET ONE BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE!quot;  To see your Wall or to write on Laurie's Wall, follow the link below:  hZp://www.facebook.com/n/?profile.php&id=1932892#wall  Thanks,  The Facebook Team  In August, Laurie’s Facebook account was commandeered by a spammer, who used it  to write on her friends’ walls. 
  7. 7. So what?  Spam is maturing.  The spammers know that I’m (very) likely to read  messages from my friends… 
  8. 8. #4: Facebook applicaDon issues  There are serious privacy issues with third‐party Facebook  applicaDons. (Hey, that’s my thesis!) From my IRB form:  “In January 2008, Facebook had 68 million registered users and was  the fiVh most‐visited website in the world. Facebook allows its  users to create online quot;profilesquot; with informaDon like their favorite  books, their work history, their relaDonship status, and  photographs…  …third‐party developers can access an unprecedented amount of  sensiDve social data about their customers. Furthermore,  applicaDons can oVen access data about users' friends and peers –  even if those targets have not explicitly acknowledged or  authorized this transfer. While Facebook does have policies  governing applicaDon developers' use and storage of the data, their  policies do not provide comprehensive protecDon for this sensiDve  informaDon.” 
  9. 9. So what?  Now it’s becoming even easier for third parDes  to collect social data about me (including my  interests, a list of my friends)… 
  10. 10. #5: chi.mp  Someone on IRC sent me this link last week: chi.mp. It’s  some sort of idenDty management service. On its front  page, it rails against “walled garden” social networking  sites. They explain:  “…Instead of creaDng a locked off network inside one  parDcular site, chi.mp creates an open and  interoperable network between sites. We use open  standards and protocols such as OpenID, Oauth,  AZribute Exchange and Atom so that anyone from any  service that embraces the same standards of freedom  and openness can connect with you.” 
  11. 11. So what?  The new push for social services is openness:  revolDng against the “walled garden” of  services like Facebook and making data  available via open standards  Belief: le|ng “a thousand flowers bloom” will  lead to amazing new social social soVware 
  12. 12. #6: Acxiom  A few years ago, PBS’s “Frontline” aired “The Persuaders”, a fascinaDng  documentary about adverDsing. One segment focuses on the  Acxiom CorporaDon’s data‐gathering efforts.  “If you're a company, a bank, a retailer, what you would do is say you  want leV‐handed people of a certain ethnic group, and they're  going to be able to do a list for you. You can get markeDng lists of  Hispanics who make between $20,000 and $40,000 who are U.S.  ciDzens. You can get markeDng lists of people who suffer from  inconDnence and have bought those kinds of products in the  pharmacy. You can get all sorts of things that can be very narrow.”  The reporter, media expert Douglas Rushkoff, confesses: “what Acxiom  is promising is nothing less than the soluDon to cluZer: Send us ads  only for products we really want, and anDcipate just when we will  want them.” 
  13. 13. So what?  Consumer data is incredibly valuable…and  marketers love it 
  14. 14. #7: The “Greek life” e‐mail hoax  Date: 08/29/08 21:10  To: All Faculty & All Academic Professionals & All Civil Service Staff & All  Undergrad Students & All Grad Students <everybody@uiuc.edu>  From: Chancellor Richard Herman <chancellor@illinois.edu>  Subject: Regarding Greek life on campus   Dear Students,  ...It has been my concern over the years, that the Greek culture  of alcoholism and lack of respect for the community degrades campus life...  I hope that you will consider wisely.  GDI Chancellor Richard Herman 
  15. 15. #7: The “Greek life” e‐mail hoax  Prompted a statement from Public Affairs:  From: Robin Kaler <publicaffairs@illinois.edu>  Date: Mon, Sep 1, 2008 at 10:00 PM  Subject: MASSMAIL ‐ email hoax  To: All Faculty & All Academic Professionals & All Civil Service Staff & All Undergrad Students & All  Grad Students <everybody@uiuc.edu>  Dear members of the campus community:  You may have received an email Dtled:  Regarding Greek life on campus.  This message was a hoax and was NOT sent by Chancellor Richard Herman and  was NOT authorized by the campus administraDon.  Robin Kaler  Associate Chancellor for Public Affairs 
  16. 16. #7: The “Greek life” e‐mail hoax  The forgery was convincing: even tech‐savvy  people believed the hoax – and doubted the  official response 
  17. 17. #7: The “Greek life” e‐mail hoax  And it wasn’t hard to do, either:  DI: “Mass e‐mail confirmed as hoax” (Sep 2)  “It's very easy for someone to send an e‐mail  and make it look like it came from someone  else,” Corn [the director of security and  privacy for CITES] said. 
  18. 18. So what?  E‐mail spoofing is easy – and incredibly effecDve 
  19. 19. #8: Friend of a Friend  “What is FOAF?  The basic idea behind FOAF is simple: the Web is all about  making connecDons between things. FOAF provides some  basic machinery to help us tell the Web about the  connecDons between the things that maZer to us.  Thousands of people already do this on the Web by describing  themselves and their lives on their home page. Using FOAF,  you can help machines understand your home page, and  through doing so, learn about the relaDonships that  connect people, places and things described on the Web.  FOAF…integrates informaDon from your home page with  that of your friends, and the friends of your friends, and  their friends…” 
  20. 20. #8: Friend of a Friend  LiveJournal now publishes FOAF for all of its  16 million users.  Let’s look at Brad Fitzpatrick’s FOAF data:   hZp://brad.livejournal.com/data/foaf 
  21. 21. #8: Friend of a Friend  <foaf:Person>   <foaf:nick>brad</foaf:nick>   <foaf:name>Brad Fitzpatrick</foaf:name>   <ya:country dc:Dtle=quot;US” … />   <ya:city dc:Dtle=quot;San+Franciscoquot; … />   <foaf:dateOfBirth>1980‐02‐05</foaf:dateOfBirth>   <ya:school ya:dateStart=quot;1994” ya:dateFinish=quot;1998” dc:Dtle=quot;Aloha High Schoolquot;/>   <foaf:interest dc:Dtle=quot;campingquot; … />   <foaf:interest dc:Dtle=”cannon beachquot; … />   <foaf:interest dc:Dtle=”coffeequot; … />   <foaf:interest dc:Dtle=”computer sciencequot; … />   <foaf:knows>     <foaf:Person>       <foaf:nick>holyloki</foaf:nick>       <foaf:member_name>Ryan Dunn</foaf:member_name>       <rdfs:seeAlso rdf:resource=quot;hZp://holyloki.livejournal.com/data/foafquot; />       <foaf:weblog rdf:resource=quot;hZp://holyloki.livejournal.com/quot;/>     </foaf:Person>   </foaf:knows> … 
  22. 22. So what?  We now have a machine‐readable format for  expressing data like our name, interests,  locaDon, age, school history…  …and links to our friends…  (It was possible to scrape LiveJournal and other  sites before, but building the parser was a bit  more expensive. Remember, if we make  something cheaper…) 
  23. 23. #9: Public‐key infrastructure  If we had a reliable public‐key infrastructure, we  could do strong authenDcaDon, secure e‐mail…  Why don’t we have a PKI? Peter Gutmann calls out  some “grand challenges” The first one? Key  lookup  If you want to talk securely to someone, you need  their public key. Diffie and Hellman propose  pu|ng it in the phone book. Ronald Rivest et al  admit this has problems and is unlikely to  happen. 
  24. 24. So what?  Secure e‐mail (etc.) hampered by lack of a good  key distribuDon system… 
  25. 25. A predicDon  Steve’s a good friend. I trust his opinions. We’re friends on a social‐ networking site, and it’s not hard to find our e‐mails, interests, and  physical addresses.  I expect to see e‐mail like this in the next few years:  From: Steve Bezek <sbezek2@uiuc.edu>  To: Alex Lambert  Subject: food  Hey, I saw your status earlier, and it said you were hungry. Grizzlebee’s is just a  few blocks from your apartment, and their quesadillas are awesome. You  should go there tonight.  ‐‐ Steve  Except Steve never sent this e‐mail. Spammers will harvest my social  networking data for targeDng. They’ll send it from Steve’s address,  because they know I’m friends with him and will trust him. This is scary. 
  26. 26. A predicDon  Remember: “We created an e‐mail system that  provided incredible incenDves for abuse…the  system provided aZracDve opportuniDes, and  we shouldn’t be surprised that spammers took  advantage of those opportuniDes.”  We have an opportunity to solve this problem  NOW – and we have to do it now, before the  social spam floodgates open. 
  27. 27. A proposal  If Steve had digitally signed his messages with his  public key, I’d know this message was bogus.  (In a few years: “If I’m ge|ng a message from a  friend, and it’s signed with their public key, don’t  mark it as spam. Otherwise, assume it’s spam.”)  So how can I get Steve’s public key?  Answer: Through Facebook. Use social networking  websites to bootstrap a public‐key infrastructure.  (And make signing messages so easy that your  mom could do it…crypto has huge usability  problems right now.) 
  28. 28. Summary  •  Public keys are published to social networking  sites  •  Outgoing messages are (easily) signed  •  Incoming messages are (easily) verified  •  Finally, we get secure e‐mail (and this paves  the way for other secure services) 
  29. 29. Toward a user interface  •  Users have figured out how to use their e‐mail client  •  Goal is not to revoluDonize the e‐mail UI: instead, add  usable security too it  •  ParDcularly challenging: preserve exisDng workflows  but add security in a way that “makes sense”  •  …and makes security aZracDve  –  Need to dangle a carrot to convince users who don’t  directly care about security…  –  …because their (understandable and reasonable!) a|tude  endangers others’ security 
  30. 30. The carrot: a richer address book  •  Facebook friends/etc are automaDcally added to address book  –  …and so are their public keys (but the user doesn’t care)  –  This is cool! Look at all the Facebook groups/events for “hey, I lost my  phone”  •  Address book details are enhanced by social networking data  –  Picture of the user  –  IM/phone  •  Technically, all of this is orthogonal to the PKI side  –  A more holisDc, user‐centered design perspecDve cauDons: if it’s not  adopted, it might as well not exist  –  Needs to provide immediate, tangible, compelling benefit, or users  won’t bother 
  31. 31. Simple changes  •  Add assurance mechanisms to exisDng client  –  Don’t disturb the underlying metaphor  –  In fact, use exisDng (mis)concepDon that e‐mail is  secure for our benefit  •  Simple, understandable:  –  Avoid technical terms like “signed”, “encrypted”  –  Avoid silly opDons like encrypDon without  authenDcaDon 

×