Ola carol french ppt 2016

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Market Probe Ontario Public Opinion Poll on Public Libraries

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Ola carol french ppt 2016

  1. 1. Prepared for: Federation of Ontario Public Libraries Research Task Force Carol French, VP, MarketProbe Canada OLA Super Conference - Jan. 28, 2015 FEDERATION OF ONTARIO PUBLIC LIBRARIES RESEARCH
  2. 2. Market Probe 2 Context of FOPL Stats and Measurements • Statistics and Measurements Strategies – Participate in CLA task force on national statistics – Host 2 iSchool symposia on measurements for libraries – Lobby for open data for public libraries – Publish analysis of Ministry data collection for 2001-2013. – Publish Market Probe opinion polls for 2015 (building on 2001, 2006, 2010 polls) – Host and record these webinars – Coming Soon: FOPL Index of Community Engagement • Thank you to the Ministry of Tourism Culture and Sport for some support. 2
  3. 3. Market Probe 3 Topics Introduction Background Library Usage Accessing the Library Library Services Value of the Public Library Future Outlook Conclusions
  4. 4. Market Probe 4 2015 Survey: Connecting to the past with a view to the future… • Fourth wave of a study that has been conducted every five years since 2000 • Objectives: – Understand Ontario residents’ opinions about the use, role and impact of public libraries, and how those opinions have changed over time – Separate public opinion by level of usage of public libraries (including non-use) – Identify areas of strength and weakness for the public library • Results will be used to: – Monitor status of the library – Formulate strategy – Identify priorities – Provide input to a new marketing communication plan
  5. 5. Market Probe 5 …through the use of a dual telephone / online survey method • Significant differences exist between phone and web respondents • Also differences in the way people respond to questions based on methodology – Multiple response questions – Rating scale questions – Social desirability bias Both surveys made available in English and French Telephone Survey • 600 telephone interviews conducted from February 26th to March 16th, 2015 Online Survey • 1,102 online surveys conducted from March 5th to March 10th, 2015 using Delvinia’s AskingCanadians online panel Age and gender controlled by quotas Phone Web Households with children 40% 22% Graduated college/university 55% 70% Live in Metro TO / Urban GTA 39% 52% Born outside Canada 19% 24%
  6. 6. Market Probe 6 Most Ontarians read books, and still primarily in hard copy format 86% 27% 28% 31% 16+ books read 6 to 15 books read 1 to 5 books read Any Books Read in Past 12 Months 17% 66% 18% Most likely to have read no books: • High school or less education 26% • <$35K household income 23% • Singles 20% • Men 19% Mostly in electronic format Mostly in hard copy Both equally Books Read in the Past Year Format of Books Read in the Past Year Age 18-34: 18% Age 55+: 38%
  7. 7. Market Probe 7 Bookstore usage has remained steady, with a substantial portion of traffic swinging to online visits 12% 18% 51% 19% 14% 14% 41% 31% More than 10 times 6 to 10 times 1 to 5 times None In-Person Online 22% 47% 31% Online more About the same In-person more Past Year Bookstore Visit Frequency 26% 21% 37% 17% 25% 21% 38% 16% 27% 22% 34% 16% 34% 22% 31% 12% More than 10 times 6 to 10 times 1 to 5 times None 2015 2010 2005 2000 Past Year Bookstore Visit Frequency Relative Frequency of Visiting Bookstore Online and In-Person
  8. 8. Market Probe 8 87% 83% 44% 42% 41% 23% 17% 88% 83% 50% 23% 26% 21% 2015 2010 While Internet penetration has not changed in the last five years, the ways in which people access the Internet have shifted Higher among web panelists 99% 86% 84% 73% 56% 33% 24% 23% 6% Any Internet Access At home At work At other places in the community using a smartphone At other places in the community using wireless access At your public library At school Regular Use of Internet Search for specific information of interest Use e-mail, a chat room or IM Access the news Access social networking sites Stream movies, music or other types of entertainment Download movies, music or other types of entertainment Download books or magazines Create content Ways Internet Was Accessed in the Past Year Uses of Internet
  9. 9. Market Probe 9 Respondent Only 27% With Others in Household 42% Other Household Member(s) Only 7% No One 24% Respondent Only 28% With Others in Household 41% Other Household Member(s) Only 10% No One 21% 73% 68% 65% 65% Yes 2015 2010 2005 2000 Household use of the public library may be slipping slightly, despite a reported increase in library card ownership Total Household Usage of the Public Library 2015 2010 49% 26% 22% 8% 50% 31% 23% 8% 47% 27% 19% 7% 51% 24% 17% 9% Children Spouse/partner Others 2015 2010 2005 2000 In Household Used by Others (net) 19% among web panelists 27% among web panelistsTotal Users 70% Total Users 69% Past Year Use of Public Library by Other Household Members 68% among web panelists 3% among web panelists Have a Library Card
  10. 10. Market Probe 10 For most Ontarians, the public library is located close to home and tends to be an inviting place Distance from Home to Closest Library 70% 20% 5% 1% 4% 5 kilometres or less 6 to 10 kilometres 11 to 20 kilometres More than 20 kilometres Don’t know Condition of Library Closest to Home 56% 28% 2% 13% Inviting space Okay, but could use some improvement Not pleasant Never been inside library Ranges from 64% in Northern Ontario to 80% in Metro Toronto 5 kilometres or less 6 to 10 kilometres 11 to 20 kilometres More than 20 kilometres Don’t know Inviting space Okay, but could use some improvement Not pleasant Never been inside library Age 18-34: 47% Age 55+: 62%
  11. 11. Market Probe 11 Nearly one-third of those surveyed have not used the public library in the past year (although most have used it sometime in the past) Don’t Use the Public Library 31% 31% 30% 31% 2015 2010 2005 2000 91%9% Yes (%) No (%) Ever used the Public Library Had a Negative Experience (All users, current and past) 5%95% Yes (%) No (%) 10% among web panelists
  12. 12. Market Probe 12 50% 30% 21% 8% 7% 6% 40% 34% 27% 9% 10% 6% 21% 25% 26% 7% 3% 6% 22% 30% 21% 12% 8% 6% Get information from other sources Not interested Too busy Don't read Library isn't accessible Use library at school or work Availability of information from other sources and lack of interest are the two main reasons for not using the public library Reasons for Not Using the Public Library 6% 5% 3% 3% 4% 4% 1% 11% 4% 1% 5% 7% 4% 2% 2% 6% 7% 2% Due to illness / injury / too old No reason / don't know Prefer to buy / share books Library hours not convenient Have own library / books Get information from other sources Not interested Too busy Don't read Library isn't accessible Use library at school or work Due to illness / injury / too old No reason / don't know Prefer to buy / share books Library hours not convenient Have own library / books Reasons reversed among web panelists 68% 32% 65% 35% 65% 35% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Yes No 2015 2010 2005 2000 • Higher income earners are more likely to get information from other sources • Those with lower income are more likely to not be interested
  13. 13. Market Probe 13 Frequency of visiting the library in person has remained constant, while online access has increased over the last five years In-Person Library Visit Frequency in Past Year Accessed Library by… Telephone 22% Text 2% Social Media 7% 17% 10% 12% 27% 34% 18% 11% 12% 25% 34% 18% 12% 10% 25% 34% 19% 11% 12% 25% 32% 21+ times 11 to 20 times 6 to 10 times 1 to 5 times Not at all 2015 2010 2005 2000 Times Accessed Library’s Website in Past Year 17% 25% 58% 12% 22% 66% 9% 28% 63% 11 or more times 1 to 10 times Not at all 2015 2010 2005 37% among web panelists 37% among web panelists 43% among web panelists 11% among web panelists
  14. 14. Market Probe 14 Use of the Internet to access the public library is complementing, not replacing, in-person visits 2010 37% 1% 1% 13% 12% In-Person Internet Phone 33% 2% 2015 27% 1% 1% 20% 11% In-Person Internet Phone 36% 3% Ways Users Access the Public Library Significant differences among web panelists (2015): In-person only 19% In-person / Internet 49% In-person / phone 3%
  15. 15. Market Probe 15 88% 35% 22% 11% 4% A desktop or laptop computer A tablet A smartphone An e-reader An iPod or MP3 player E-readers are less popular than other devices for accessing library materials 33%67% Yes (%) No (%) Devices Used to Access Resources from the Library E-reader ownership (among those who have not used an e-reader to access library resources) 30% 70% Yes (%) No (%) Ever tried to download public library e-books using an e-reader A desktop or laptop computer A tablet A smartphone An e-reader An iPod or MP3 player
  16. 16. Market Probe 16 Bookstores continue to receive more visits than libraries, especially online Bookstore vs. Library Visit Frequency 42% 26% 29% 3% 43% 28% 28% 1% Bookstores more About the same Libraries more Don't know 2015 2010 9% 21% 26% 12% 21% 10% 13% 15% 19% 10% 25% 18% Library only Library more Both equally Bookstore more Bookstore only Neither In-Person Usage Online Usage Relative Frequency of Using Libraries and Bookstores
  17. 17. Market Probe 17 In-person library visitors are engaging in fewer activities, with use of the library’s wireless network being the only one to register increased usage Reasons for Personally Using the Public Library 84% 56% 34% 28% 26% 25% 23% 23% 16% 14% 10% 90% 70% 41% 33% 26% 17% 33% 23% 13% 21% 16% 88% 73% 38% 31% 32% 18% 9% 21% 16% 88% 77% 47% 19% 32% 17% 9% 24% 18% Borrow books, CDs, DVDs or other materials Get information on a topic of personal interest Read or study Access the Internet using library computers Relax or socialize Use the library's wireless network Access databases / other electronically stored info* Take a child to a program or activity Attend a lecture, program, meeting or training session Work assignment or keep up-to-date at work School or class assignment 86% 59% 44% 35% 31% 31% 27% 25% 18% 21% 27% Total Household Usage (2015) 68% 32% 65% 35% 65% 35% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Yes No 2015 2010 2005 2000 Web panelists indicated fewer reasons in total and, in particular, were much less likely to mention borrowing materials and getting information on a topic of interest * Wording changed in 2015.
  18. 18. Market Probe 18 64% 45% 36% 26% 26% 25% 19% 13% 12% 9% 7% 6% 4% 72% 55% 49% 25% 35% 28% 15% 13% 14% 12% 10% 8% 2015 2010 Similarly, at the total respondent level, household usage of nearly all library services has declined since 2010 Lender of materials Assistance in finding information Reference centre Focal point or meeting place Place to study Help with school projects or homework Local history collections Training in how to access information online* Early literacy programs Government services through library-based kiosks Information for the unemployed Resources for small business and entrepreneurs Services to new Canadians Web panelists reported lower household usage of almost all services shown, especially obtaining assistance in finding information Past Year Usage of Library Services by Someone in Household * Wording changed in 2015.
  19. 19. Market Probe 19 42% 30% 24% 26% 14% 14% 10% 5% 34% 25% 21% 23% 12% 5% 4% 33% 14% 14% 13% 7% 2% 8% 5% 2% Check catalogue Renew an item Reserve an item Access other materials via library's website Download an item Manage / make changes to library account Consult a librarian by e-mail, chat or IM Unlike in-person activities, use of the library by telephone / text and Internet has increased over the past five years 23% 16% 14% 12% 4% 19% 13% 13% 10% 12% 7% 10% 7% 18% 11% Consult a librarian Renew an item Reserve an item Enquire / request changes to account 68% 32% 65% 35% 65% 35% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Yes No 2015 2010 2005 2000 Telephone / Text* Consult a librarian Renew an item Reserve an item Enquire / request changes to account Internet Check catalogue Renew an item Reserve an item Access other materials via library's website Download an item Manage / make changes to library account Consult a librarian by e-mail, chat or IM Past Year Use of Public Library by Telephone / Text Past Year Use of Public Library by Internet 57% among web panelists * Wording changed in 2015.
  20. 20. Market Probe 20 E-books, fiction and non-fiction, are clearly the most widely used electronic resources obtained from the library 41%59% Yes (%) No (%) 39% 28% 15% 14% 14% 9% 8% 6% E-books fiction E-books non-fiction Digital movies E-newspapers or journal articles E-magazines E-audiobooks Digital music E-local history or genealogy information Checked the Library’s Online Catalogue, Downloaded an Item, or Accessed Other Materials via the Library’s Website Telephone respondents indicated a significant increase in their use of fiction e-books over the past five years, and a directional increase in non-fiction as well E-books fiction E-books non-fiction Digital movies E-newspapers or journal articles E-magazines E-audiobooks Digital music E-local history or genealogy information Specific Types of Electronic Resources Used on Library’s Website
  21. 21. Market Probe 21 Relatively few of those who access the library’s electronic materials were familiar with the new electronic channels or services some libraries offer 27% 22% 15% 13% 13% Zinio Hoopla AskON Indieflix Freegal Familiar with Channel Accessed via Library Account Accessed Elsewhere Familiarity and Use of New Electronic Channels 7% 9% 9% 2% 3% 3% 1% 2% 4% 2%
  22. 22. Market Probe 22 47 39 42 36 25 24 28 33 The public library is the only affordable place where the average Ontarian can go for information The public library is the best place for people of all ages to go to pursue lifelong learning Bottom 6 Ratings (1-6 on a 10-pt. scale) Top 2 Ratings (9-10 on a 10-pt. scale) 36% 50% 11% 3% 37% 49% 11% 3% 25% 56% 16% 4% 22% 55% 20% 3% Top of list Middle of list Bottom of list Don't know 2015 2010 2005 2000 Ontarians’ overall opinions about the public library have held steady, and perhaps even improved slightly, since 2010 68% 32% 65% 35% 65% 35% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Yes No 2015 2010 2005 2000 Benefit of Public Libraries Relative to Other Municipal Tax-Supported Services Believability of Positioning Statements Bottom 6 Ratings (1-6 on a 10-pt. scale) Top 2 Ratings (9-10 on a 10-pt. scale) Age 18-34: 29% Age 55+: 40%
  23. 23. Market Probe 23 56% 54% 50% 46% 34% 32% 31% 30% 29% 28% 26% 26% 25% 19% Most Ontarians acknowledge the public library’s role in advancing literacy, equal opportunity, and quality of life in their communities Public libraries are important because they promote literacy and a love of reading By providing free access to materials and resources, the public library plays an important role in giving everyone a chance to succeed Having a public library improves the quality of life in a community Public libraries are welcoming, friendly places The public library is the only affordable place where the average Ontarian can go for information Public libraries provide many services people would have a hard time finding elsewhere The public library provides valuable resources to increase health literacy within the communities it serves The public library is the best place for people of all ages to go to pursue lifelong learning Public libraries have done a good job of keeping up with new technologies The public library serves as an important meeting place and focal point within the community The public library is continually expanding the services it offers It is very easy to find whatever you are looking for at the public library Now that information is available from so many different sources, people need public libraries more than ever By providing access to information from a wide variety of sources, public libraries promote an understanding of political issues % Strongly Agree Believability of Positioning Statements 42% 65% 47% 59% 39% 60% 35% 52% 25% 35% 24% 37% 24% 31% 25% 30% 22% 36% 22% 28% 23% 28% 18% 30% 20% 25% 17% 17% By Age 18-34 55+
  24. 24. Market Probe 24 The perceived value of several library services has increased over the past five years 68% 32% 65% 35% 65% 35% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Yes No 2015 2010 2005 2000 Perceived Value of Library Services * Wording changed in 2015. 68 60 56 54 50 45 45 40 37 31 31 28 21 69 46 55 45 42 47 27 30 24 22 25 18 9 13 15 14 17 20 18 26 31 33 35 39 45 9 22 13 21 22 16 35 33 39 44 39 46 Lender of materials Early literacy programs Reference centre Provider of support for school projects or homework Place to study Local history collections Assistance in finding information Services to new Canadians Information for the unemployed Trainer in how to access info online* Focal point or meeting place Government services through library- based kiosks Resources for small business and entrepreneurs Bottom 6 Ratings (1-6 on a 10-pt. scale) Top 2 Ratings (9-10 on a 10-pt. scale) n/an/a Web panelists’ ratings were lower for almost all services, likely due to methodology Bottom 6 Ratings (1-6 on a 10-pt. scale) Top 2 Ratings (9-10 on a 10-pt. scale)
  25. 25. Market Probe 25 0 40 80 Assistance in Finding Information Early Literacy Progams Focal Point or Meeting Place Government Services Kiosks Information for the Unemployed Lender of Materials Local History CollectionsPlace to Study Reference Centre Resources for Small Business Services to New Canadians Support for School Projects or Homework Training in How to Access Info Online There is a bigger gap between web panelists’ perceived value and usage of assistance with finding information versus phone respondents 0 40 80 Assistance in finding information Early literacy programs Focal point or meeting place Government services through library-based kiosks Information for the unemployed Lender of materials Local history collectionsPlace to study Provider of support for school projects or homework Reference centre Resources for small business and entrepreneurs Services to new Canadians Training in how to access info online Percent Valuing the Service Percent Using the Service Telephone Survey Online Survey Value & Usage Combined 0 40 80 Assistance in Finding Information Early Literacy Programs Focal Point or Meeting Place Government Services Kiosks Information for the Unemployed Lender of Materials Local History CollectionsPlace to Study Reference Centre Resources for Small Business Services to New Canadians Support for School Projects or Homework Training in How to Access Info Online
  26. 26. Market Probe 26 Services to new Canadians and support for school projects / homework are of higher relative value to non-users than users Relative Value of Services to Users and Non-Users Lender of Materials Reference Centre Government Services Kiosks Meeting Place Early Literacy Programs Place to Study Local History Collections Training in How to Access Info Information for Unemployed Resources for Small Business Assistance in Finding Info Services to New Canadians Support of School Projects/Homework 6.2 6.4 6.6 6.8 7.0 7.2 7.4 7.3 7.5 7.7 7.9 8.1 8.3 8.5 8.7 8.9 ValuetoNon-UsersofEachService Value to Users of Each Service
  27. 27. Market Probe 27 Most Ontarians feel that, hypothetically, a local library closing would have more impact on the community than on themselves and their families 64% 29% 7% 32% 45% 23% Major Impact Minor Impact No Impact at all Community Family Telephone survey respondents were more likely than web panelists to think there would be major impacts Major Minor None Major 29% 30% 6% Minor 3% 15% 11% None 0% 0% 6% Family Impact CommunityImpact Impact of Public Library Closing on… Age 18-34: 57% Age 55+: 72% Age 18-34: 24% Age 55+: 36%
  28. 28. Market Probe 28 Views remain mixed as to whether libraries will become more or less important in the future 26% 43% 27% 5% 23% 44% 29% 4% 27% 45% 23% 6% 27% 41% 25% 7% More important No change Less important Don't know 2015 2010 2005 2000 Opinion of Future Importance of Public Libraries
  29. 29. Market Probe 29 19% 15% 15% 16% 10% 12% 12% 9% 9% 7% 36% 35% 35% 29% 33% 27% 26% 26% 24% 24% 55% 50% 49% 44% 44% 39% 38% 35% 33% 31% Very Likely Somewhat Likely Total Interest in new library service concepts varies, in many cases based on age A program that allows people to try out the newest tech devices or applications, such as 3D printers or laser cutters Library kiosks located throughout the community where people can check out books, movies or music without having to go to the library itself A personalized online account that gives you recommendations based on your past library activity A cell phone app that allows you to access library services from your mobile phone An online research service where you could pose questions and get responses from librarians A cell phone app that helps you locate material easily in the library using GPS E-book readers already loaded with the book you want to read Instruction on how to use handheld reading devices and tablets Classes on how to download library e-books to handheld devices A digital media lab where you could create and upload new digital content like your own movies or e-books Likelihood of Using Different Library Services 64% 46% 57% 39% 61% 39% 62% 24% 43% 37% 54% 19% 45% 34% 31% 40% 30% 38% 42% 21% By Age 18-34 55+
  30. 30. Market Probe 30 66% 51% 45% 35% 34% 30% 26% 19% 8% Communication preferences also differ by age, but email does rank highest among all groups Email Articles in the local paper Information on the library's website Social media Notices at the library Notices in community centres or other public places Inserts with your tax bill or other local government mailings Notices in schools Talks / presentations to community groups Best Way to Inform about What’s Going On at the Library 59% 73% 40% 63% 36% 48% 46% 22% 31% 34% 28% 32% 20% 32% 21% 12% 6% 12% By Age 18-34 55+
  31. 31. Market Probe 31 Connecting to the past: the public library continues to deliver value as patrons’ usage patterns evolve • Overall opinions and value perceptions of the library remain very strong. – Its position in people’s minds relative to other tax-supported services is consistent with previous studies, and reactions to earlier positioning statements have improved slightly. – The public acknowledges the library’s role in advancing literacy, equal opportunity, and quality of life in Ontario communities. – The value of certain services (e.g., for young children, new Canadians, and the unemployed) has increased over the past five years. – A majority of residents feel if their local library were to close, it would have a major impact on the community (but not necessarily on them personally). • Numbers of library users have remained consistent, but usage patterns have changed. – The number of library non-users has been extremely steady over the last 15 years. – Library card ownership has increased; still, household usage levels may be softening slightly. – Reported in-person library visit frequency has remained the same over the years, but in 2015, the number of people using the library both online and in-person has surpassed the number of in-person-only visitors. – Usage of many services is lower than reported previously, indicating that library users may be becoming more selective in choosing which services to use.
  32. 32. Market Probe 32 View to the future: the library needs to determine which investments to make (and which to skip) in the face of technological and social change • Regular review of strategies and tactics becomes even more important as technology, channel, and media preferences change. – Electronic access is complementing, not replacing, in-person usage; therefore, duplication of hard copy and electronic materials, plus increased channel costs, will be the norm for the foreseeable future. – Ensuring compatibility with an ever expanding array of electronic devices will continue to pose challenges. • Communicating about new service offerings will be as important as providing them. – Traditional library services are not increasing in usage or perceived value. – Interest in new services is fragmented, meaning trade-offs will need to made. – Communications about new services will have to be geared to the proper segments to create sufficient awareness, interest, and take-up. – People’s preference for email suggests that creation of contact lists, user groups and advisory panels may be required in order to maintain a dialogue with library users. • How the library can best serve a future generation of users remains uncertain. – Older people’s respect for the heritage and social contribution of the public library system will not necessarily be passed down to a younger generation. – Not every library can afford to be all things to all people; there may be an increasing need to develop centrally and deliver locally.
  33. 33. Market Probe 33 The biggest challenge of all… All future strategies and plans should be designed with the objective of convincing more people that the public library can be of as much value to them personally as they think it is to others.
  34. 34. Questions? www.fopl.ca Stephen Abram, Executive Director 416-395-0746 sabram@fopl.ca
  35. 35. Thank You www.fopl.ca Stephen Abram, Executive Director 416-395-0746 sabram@fopl.ca
  36. 36. Market Probe The Federation would like to thank the Ontario Ministry of Tourism and Culture for the historical data Market Probe

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