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Framing the Opportunities for
Powerful Metrics in Libraries
Rebecca Jones & Joe Matthews
rebecca@dysartjones.com & joe@j...
Churchill’s Frame
A pessimist sees the
difficulty in every
opportunity; an
optimist sees the
opportunity in
every difficul...
Keyne’s Frame
The difficulty lies
not so much in
developing new
ideas as in
escaping from
old ones.
Frame or anchor?
Are clear on:
 their purpose
 the culture in which they operate
 what’s important & of value to their
stakeholders
 no...
Three types of measures
Value
SatisfactionOperational
Understand
the Context
Align
Strategies &
Objectives
Identify
Services &
Programs
Define
Measures
Manage
Measurement
Data
...
INPUT OUTPUT OUTCOME IMPACT
It’s logical that:
resource
perspective
operational
perspective
user
perspective
stakeholder
p...
The Logic Model
Refocus from the activity & output
to the impact
Start with the end in mind
Some Interesting Studies
The Library Cube
University of Minnesota Library
Hope College Library
Resonate
University of Minnesota
Summer Reading
The real frame:
How have we
impacted someone’s
life – their studies, their
work, their ability to
read, their garden –
tod...
The real frame:
How have we
impacted someone’s
life – their studies, their
work, their ability to
read, their garden –
tod...
 What problems do people face?
What are their pains?
 What pain relievers can we best
provide?
 What are the desired ou...
Our frames for today
Metrics symposium framing the opportunities for powerful metrics in libraries with joe m
Metrics symposium framing the opportunities for powerful metrics in libraries with joe m
Metrics symposium framing the opportunities for powerful metrics in libraries with joe m
Metrics symposium framing the opportunities for powerful metrics in libraries with joe m
Metrics symposium framing the opportunities for powerful metrics in libraries with joe m
Metrics symposium framing the opportunities for powerful metrics in libraries with joe m
Metrics symposium framing the opportunities for powerful metrics in libraries with joe m
Metrics symposium framing the opportunities for powerful metrics in libraries with joe m
Metrics symposium framing the opportunities for powerful metrics in libraries with joe m
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Metrics symposium framing the opportunities for powerful metrics in libraries with joe m

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  • Setting the tone for the symposium and using examples, Rebecca introduces the opportunities in new metrics for all types of libraries.  She draws on some of the early successes and experiments with new measurements tie it to its academic, library and program underpinningsJoe & I are to set the tone; the tone for a day, in which obviously so many have incredible interest – a tone for a day of looking at metrics. Hm…that tone could be “For whom the bell tolls” (humour, Joe – I’m going for humour). You can, of course, choose your frame – ultimately we each do. And in 30 odd years of working in the information-intensive sector, from libraries to HR to IT to education and back again, I’ve learned that we choose our frame and it, in turn, determines how we see things – and particularly how we see measures. I know that Jane & Stephen have designed today to informative, stimulating and, knowing them – provocative. It’s often the provoking that stimulates our thinking.
  • First off, let me say that I’m honoured to have the chance to be on the same ticket as Joe Matthews in any discussion of measures. Long before I met Joe I was reading his books and articles on the problems of library measurements. He’s looked at measurement from both sides now - From up and down, and still somehow - It's those darn illusions Joe, recall? - & measures are that hard at all
  • John Maynard Keynes – certainly one of the most influential economist of the 20th century – fundamentallychanges how governments looked at their economies
  • Learned about “measures” in the corporate environment, and then, within that, in the IT environment,And, after that I worked with a colleague who was then in a large pharmaceutical, to look at & learn from other sectorsNo one magic measureSuccessful organizations:clarity of purposeunderstand their cultureperformance measurement system that fits that culture“Value” is dynamic, economic , psychological & relative to alternatives
  • Be clear on which metrics you need when:You need to know how well your operations are performing – but you sure don’t need to convey this to decision-makersYou want to know if clients are satisfiedAnd you want to know if what you are doing is of value……blah blah
  • There are 2 performance measurement systems that I know of that fit this framework, the Balanced Scorecard and the Logic Model.
  • Talk about university of guelph’s work with this – and there are others
  • Helps avoid this scenario and gives you a tool for telling your performance story. The logic model is a roadmap for showing value. Forces proactive planning Guides decision making with a process for assessing potential value focuses on results – shows the difference between what we do and what impact we have makes it easier to stay on track builds common priorities clarifies purpose – easier to stay on track … an approach for clarifying the problems, objectives, activities and benefits of a project before decisions are made
  • The Library Data Impact Project in the UKHuddersfield University LibraryTop – book borrowingBottom – eResourcesNote: Almost half of all students – over a 4 year period – did not borrow anything from the library – anythingAbout 4 in 10 students did NOT download an electronic journal article over the 4 year periodYet there was a strong correlation been student attainment (grades) and borrowing of materials and downloading eResources And no correlation with entrance to the library building – to study, get a coffee, meet friends, and so forth
  • The Library Cube. The University of Wollongong Library in AustraliaUsing correlation analysis, the library is able to demonstrate that use of library resources translates into improved student retentionLibrary Cube includes library transaction data, student demographic data, and student achievement data (grades, retention)
  • The University of Minnesota Data and Student Success ProjectTracked student ID for every library transaction over the course of a yearLooked at first year students1521 or 28% of student who used the library did so ONCE1181 or 22% used the library TWICE91% of the students used the library 5 times or lessPeak use (7 interactions with the library) led to the highest improvement in the GPAAfter that – declining return on investment
  • Libvalue.cci.utk.eduCarol Tenopir
  • Library ROI studies do not always resonate among the library’s stakeholdersCheck out the preferences of your stakeholders before proceeding with an ROI analysis$4 to $6 of benefits for every $1 of the library’s budget
  • Wonderful articles - Gym Bags and Mortarboards – reports of a study that indirectly led to the university deciding to invest $59 million in a Recreation Center expansion. The analysis revealed that usage of the campus recreational facilities one standard deviation more than the average (about 25 times in the semester), increased a student’s probability of first-year retention by 1 percent and the probability of 5-year graduation rate by 2 percent
  • Mid-Continent Public Library MissouriSummer Learning Loss is often defined as the loss of reading comprehension skills over the course of a summer break. Previous studies have shown that students who do not read over the summer can be affected by this summer loss, and can actually score lower on their fall reading tests than those taken in the spring.
  • Anythink Libraries in Colorado – circulation doubled by replacing Dewey and embracing merchandising the colleciton
  • Tulsa Public Library -
  • C3 – Customer Centered Classification
  • Task Force – outcomes for library programs
  • climb, be curious, question our frames – our anchors
  • Metrics symposium framing the opportunities for powerful metrics in libraries with joe m

    1. 1. { Framing the Opportunities for Powerful Metrics in Libraries Rebecca Jones & Joe Matthews rebecca@dysartjones.com & joe@joematthews.org
    2. 2. Churchill’s Frame A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
    3. 3. Keyne’s Frame The difficulty lies not so much in developing new ideas as in escaping from old ones.
    4. 4. Frame or anchor?
    5. 5. Are clear on:  their purpose  the culture in which they operate  what’s important & of value to their stakeholders  not what the people in their communities or campuses or companies need, but rather what they need to do  how library services expedite or enhance people’s ability to do what they want to or need to do Successful measurers
    6. 6. Three types of measures Value SatisfactionOperational
    7. 7. Understand the Context Align Strategies & Objectives Identify Services & Programs Define Measures Manage Measurement Data Translate Data into Outcomes & Impacts Communicate Results Measurement Framework
    8. 8. INPUT OUTPUT OUTCOME IMPACT It’s logical that: resource perspective operational perspective user perspective stakeholder perspective
    9. 9. The Logic Model
    10. 10. Refocus from the activity & output to the impact Start with the end in mind
    11. 11. Some Interesting Studies
    12. 12. The Library Cube
    13. 13. University of Minnesota Library
    14. 14. Hope College Library
    15. 15. Resonate
    16. 16. University of Minnesota
    17. 17. Summer Reading
    18. 18. The real frame: How have we impacted someone’s life – their studies, their work, their ability to read, their garden – today?
    19. 19. The real frame: How have we impacted someone’s life – their studies, their work, their ability to read, their garden – today?
    20. 20.  What problems do people face? What are their pains?  What pain relievers can we best provide?  What are the desired outcomes & impacts?  How well are we allocating our resources to achieve those? The real questions
    21. 21. Our frames for today

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