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 EBOOKS SYMPOSIUM!
THE CURRENT STATE OF THE ​
ART IN LIBRARIES
Stephen Abram, MLS , FOPL Executive Director
March 17, 2016
FOPL Mission
 Collaborative body offering one loud voice for 
all Ontario Public Libraries based on agreed 
cooperative s...
Introductory Goals
 Share new data on eBooks in Ontario alone
 Share common language on eBook sales 
and licensing
 Sha...
FOPL’s Market Probe Canada
Public Opinion Poll
 Statistically valid data on Ontario residents’ 
use and perceptions of pu...
Format of Books Read in the Past Year
Q.13g
Base:  Read any books in the past year (2015 - 507). New question in 2015.
• H...
Specific Types of Electronic Resources
Used on Library’s Website
Q.8a/b
Base:  All respondents (1102); those who checked t...
• As might be expected, web panel members are more likely than phone respondents to have Internet access at home or 
at wo...
Use of Internet
Q.10/11
Base:  All respondents (1102).
Regular Use of
Internet
Age
18-24 70%
25-34 69%
35-54 58%
55+ 43%
A...
Books Read in the Past Year
Q.13f
Base: All respondents (1102).
• Web panelists tended to read fewer books in the past yea...
Format of Books Read in the Past Year
Q.13g
Base: Read any books in the past year (946).
• Those who completed the online ...
Format of Books Read in the Past Year
Q.13g
Base: Read any books in the past year (946).
• Those who completed the online ...
• In the web survey, in-person bookstore use was a separate question from online use of book vendors, making
comparisons t...
A program that allows people to try out the newest tech devices or
applications, such as 3D printers or laser cutters
Libr...
Frequency of Visiting Online Book Vendor vs. Bookstore
Q.14c/d
Base: All respondents (1102).
• Comparing individuals’ answ...
Library vs. Bookstore Usage, In-Person and Online
• Comparisons of individuals’ reported frequency of using the library an...
Accessing Library Resources Electronically
Q.8c/d/e
Base: Those who checked the library’s online catalogue, downloaded an ...
Familiarity and Use of New Electronic Channels
Q.8f
Base: Those who checked the library’s online catalogue, downloaded an ...
Breaking News
 FCM: Canadian Municipal Governments Support Efforts to Bring Down
eBook Prices for Public Libraries
https:...
On the Vendor Front
 ProQuest Launches Ebook Central: Pioneering resource
simplifies workflows for librarians and users, ...
Free Guide to Ebook Licensing for
Public Libraries and Publishers
 The Guide describes in detail eight types of licenses
...
22
http://www.dosdoce.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Guide-to-Ebook-Licensing-P
Guide to features of eBooks in the
University Library collection.
 http://www.library.illinois.edu/rex/guides/ebooks/
 A...
eBook Universe
 Canadian vs. International and Big 5
 MARC records issue
24
http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Big-Five-Ebook-Terms-011816.pdf
Big Five Publishers and Li...
The Aggregators and Partners
 Overdrive, Bibliotheca Cloud Library, B&T
Axis 360, MyiLibrary/ProQuest, EBSCO,
Permabound,...
Academic and Traditional eBooks
 Cengage Gale
 McGraw Hill About 95% of marketplace
 Pearson
 OER, OA, etc.
 Gale, EB...
New(er) Tools for Digital Times
 RDA
 APIs
 Bibframe
 Linked Data
 Tags versus Fields
 Crowdsourcing
 Federated sea...
Join the
Movementhttp://www.fairpricingforlibraries.org/
29
Enjoy the rest of the symposium
 Stephen Abram
 executive director
 Federation of Ontario Public Libraries
 Stephen.ab...
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E books symposium intro

  1. 1.  EBOOKS SYMPOSIUM! THE CURRENT STATE OF THE ​ ART IN LIBRARIES Stephen Abram, MLS , FOPL Executive Director March 17, 2016
  2. 2. FOPL Mission  Collaborative body offering one loud voice for  all Ontario Public Libraries based on agreed  cooperative strategies, and priorities and  research. 2
  3. 3. Introductory Goals  Share new data on eBooks in Ontario alone  Share common language on eBook sales  and licensing  Share recent developments  Start our Symposium off well 3
  4. 4. FOPL’s Market Probe Canada Public Opinion Poll  Statistically valid data on Ontario residents’  use and perceptions of public libraries 2015  CATI and Online Polls (some differences)  I pulled out the relevant e-Book data to share  today  We have a lot of data and trends from 2000,  2006, 2010, and 2015 4
  5. 5. Format of Books Read in the Past Year Q.13g Base:  Read any books in the past year (2015 - 507). New question in 2015. • Hard copy books remain the most popular format. • Those who prefer E-books are more likely to be bookstore users and to have not visited the public library in person in  the past year. In-Person Library Use None 20% Any   8% Library vs Bookstore Usage More   8% Same   8% Less 16% Bookstore Use None   5% Any 12% Age 18-24 10% 25-34   6% 35-54 11% 55+ 13% Education  High school   9% Univ/college 10% Grad school 21% Region  North 13% East 11% Southwest   7% Metro T.O. 12% GTA Urban 16% GTA Ex-urban   5%
  6. 6. Specific Types of Electronic Resources Used on Library’s Website Q.8a/b Base:  All respondents (1102); those who checked the library’s online catalogue, downloaded an item,  or accessed other electronic materials on the library’s web page (449).   Checked the Library’s Online Catalogue, Downloaded an Item, or Accessed Other Materials via the Library’s Website • More web survey respondents than phone respondents said that they had checked the library’s online catalogue,  downloaded an item or accessed other materials via the library’s website. • When this larger base size is taken into account, the proportion of the total population accessing  the different  electronic media is almost identical for the two populations that were surveyed.
  7. 7. • As might be expected, web panel members are more likely than phone respondents to have Internet access at home or  at work. • They are no more likely, however, to access the Internet at other places around the community, including the library. • As was the case with the phone survey, those under the age of 25 form one of the library’s biggest Internet user  groups. Ways Internet Was Accessed in the Past Year Q.10 Base:  All respondents (1102). Any access Cardholder Yes 32% No   6% In-Person Library Use None  2% 1-10 times 28% 11+ times 48% Books Read in Past Year None  6% 1-5 25% 6-15 27% 16+ 29% Access Library by Phone / Text Yes 43% No 20% Access Library by Internet Yes 36% No   8% Social Media Interaction with Library Yes 46% No 22% Library Benefits  Top 34% Middle 22% Bottom   7% Age 18-24 39% 25-34 29% 35-54 25% 55+ 16% Children in Home  Yes 34% No 21% Education High school 18% Univ/college 24% Grad school 28% Region  North 18% East 21% Southwest 19% Metro T.O. 25% GTA Urban 28% GTA Ex-urban 30%
  8. 8. Use of Internet Q.10/11 Base:  All respondents (1102). Regular Use of Internet Age 18-24 70% 25-34 69% 35-54 58% 55+ 43% Age 18-24 15% 25-34   6% 35-54   5% 55+   5% • Not surprisingly, pretty well all web respondents are regular users of the Internet.  • Compared with telephone respondents who regularly use the Internet, web responders are more likely to access the  news and use e-mail/chat/IM, but are less likely to stream or download items or create content.
  9. 9. Books Read in the Past Year Q.13f Base: All respondents (1102). • Web panelists tended to read fewer books in the past year than those who responded to the survey by phone, but the proportion of non-readers was consistent across the two populations. • Women and those over the age of 55 are among the heaviest readers of books. Any Books Read Cardholder Yes 31% No 17% In-Person Library Use None 15% 1-10 times 22% 11+ times 56% In-Person Bookstore Use None 13% 1-10 times 25% 11+ times 58% Online Book Vendor Use None 18% 1-10 times 25% 11+ times 53% Access Library by Phone / Text Yes 36% No 24% Have Internet Access Work 25% Home 27% School 22% Library 32% Other 26% Access Library by Internet Yes 36% No 15% Library Benefits -u Top 38% Middle 23% Bottom 11% Gender Male 20% Female 33% Age 18-24 18% 25-34 18% 35-54 22% 55+ 38% Education High school 24% Univ/college 24% Grad school 38% Born in Canada Yes 28% No 22% Language English 27% French 32% Other 7% Region North 28% East 31% Southwest 31% Metro T.O. 27% GTA Urban 20% GTA Ex-urban 30%
  10. 10. Format of Books Read in the Past Year Q.13g Base: Read any books in the past year (946). • Those who completed the online survey were somewhat more inclined to read books in electronic format than those who completed the phone survey. • E-book usage was more common in Metro Toronto and urban portions of the GTA. In-Person Library Use None 24% 1-10 times 15% 11+ times 13% In-Person Bookstore Use None 24% 1-10 times 16% 11+ times 11% Online Book Vendor Use None 11% 1-10 times 18% 11+ times 21% Language English 17% French 8% Other 22% Region North 12% East 12% Southwest 16% Metro T.O. 21% GTA Urban 19% GTA Ex-urban 12%
  11. 11. Format of Books Read in the Past Year Q.13g Base: Read any books in the past year (946). • Those who completed the online survey were somewhat more inclined to read books in electronic format than those who completed the phone survey. • E-book usage was more common in Metro Toronto and urban portions of the GTA. In-Person Library Use None 24% 1-10 times 15% 11+ times 13% In-Person Bookstore Use None 24% 1-10 times 16% 11+ times 11% Online Book Vendor Use None 11% 1-10 times 18% 11+ times 21% Language English 17% French 8% Other 22% Region North 12% East 12% Southwest 16% Metro T.O. 21% GTA Urban 19% GTA Ex-urban 12%
  12. 12. • In the web survey, in-person bookstore use was a separate question from online use of book vendors, making comparisons to the telephone survey results invalid. • Web panelists between the ages of 25 and 34 and those whose preferred language is not English or French appear to visit bricks and mortar bookstores less often than other segments of the population. Past Year Bookstore In-Person Visit Frequency Q.14c Base: All respondents (1102). In-Person Library Use None 9% 1-10 times 11% 11+ times 16% Books Read in Past Year None 1% 1-5 5% 6-15 11% 16+ 25% Online Book Vendor Use None 5% 1-10 times 9% 11+ times 36% Social Media Interaction with Library Yes 21% No 11% Age 18-24 13% 25-34 7% 35-54 12% 55+ 13% Language English 12% French 12% Other 4% Region North 18% East 15% Southwest 10% Metro T.O. 13% GTA Urban 7% GTA Ex-urban 16%
  13. 13. A program that allows people to try out the newest tech devices or applications, such as 3D printers or laser cutters Library kiosks located throughout the community where people can check out books, movies or music without having to go to the library itself A personalized online account that gives you recommendations based on your past library activity A cell phone app that allows you to access library services from your mobile phone An online research service where you could pose questions and get responses from librarians A cell phone app that helps you locate material easily in the library using GPS E-book readers already loaded with the book you want to read Instruction on how to use handheld reading devices and tablets Classes on how to download library e-books to handheld devices A digital media lab where you could create and upload new digital content like your own movies or e-books The Likelihood of Using Library Services • Online survey participants were asked their likelihood of using some new services libraries are either offering or thinking of offering in the future. Interest in these concepts varied, in many cases based on age. • There were very few suggestions made for other services over and above those shown. Other Services Library Should Provide More selection of materials / updated materials 2% Computer / Internet skills / technical devices 2% For kids / students 2% Educational courses / lectures / seminars / community events 2% Hobbies / special interests 2% Quiet space / reading / sitting areas 1% More online services, i.e. card renewals / book / material reserving 1% They do a good job 7% Other 16% No comments / suggestions 65% 64% 46% 57% 39% 61% 39% 62% 24% 43% 37% 54% 19% 45% 34% 31% 40% 30% 38% 42% 21% By Age 18-34 55+ Q.13c/d Base: All respondents (1102).
  14. 14. Frequency of Visiting Online Book Vendor vs. Bookstore Q.14c/d Base: All respondents (1102). • Comparing individuals’ answers to the previous two questions, nearly one-quarter of those surveyed indicated that they used online book vendors more frequently than actually going to a bookstore, while almost one-third indicated the opposite. • Those who use online book vendors more include French-speaking Ontarians. Books Read in Past Year None 13% 1-5 18% 6-15 26% 16+ 28% In-Person Bookstore Use None 38% 1-10 times 19% 11+ times 12% Access Library by Internet Yes 25% No 19% Education High school 13% Univ/college 21% Grad school 33% Income <$35K 21% $35K - <$75K 18% $75K+ 28% Language English 21% French 37% Other 20% Region North 22% East 27% Southwest 23% Metro T.O. 24% GTA Urban 20% GTA Ex-urban 9%
  15. 15. Library vs. Bookstore Usage, In-Person and Online • Comparisons of individuals’ reported frequency of using the library and bookstores in-person and online were made and are presented in the chart below. • With regard to in-person usage, the largest group of respondents reported using the library and bookstores about equally, while for online usage, use of bookstores exclusively predominated. • Interestingly, more people access both bookstores only and libraries only online as opposed to in-person (but in both cases, exclusive use of one over the other is much greater for bookstores than libraries). Q.2/3/14c/d Base: All respondents (1102).
  16. 16. Accessing Library Resources Electronically Q.8c/d/e Base: Those who checked the library’s online catalogue, downloaded an item, or accessed other electronic materials on the library’s web page (449); Respondents who did not use an e-reader to access resources from the library (1054); Those who own an e-reader but did not use it to access resources from the library (349). Devices Used to Access Resources from the Library • Desktop or laptop computers remain the most common devices for accessing the public library electronically, with smartphones and tablets also having been used by approximately one-quarter to one-third of online users, respectively. • One-third of those who have not used an e-reader to access library resources actually own such a device, but of that group, fewer than one-third have ever attempted to use their e-reader to download books from the library. E-reader ownership (among those who have not used an e-reader to access library resources) Ever tried to download public library e-books using an e-reader
  17. 17. Familiarity and Use of New Electronic Channels Q.8f Base: Those who checked the library’s online catalogue, downloaded an item, or accessed other electronic materials on the library’s web page (449). Familiar with Channel • Relatively few of those who use the library to access electronic materials said they were familiar with the different electronic channels or services some libraries offer. • Zinio and Hoopla were most familiar to online library users, with the latter being accessed more through the library than elsewhere. Accessed via Library Account 7% 9% 3% 1% 4% Accessed Elsewhere 9% 2% 3% 2% 2%
  18. 18. Breaking News  FCM: Canadian Municipal Governments Support Efforts to Bring Down eBook Prices for Public Libraries https://librarianship.ca/news/fcm-ebooks/  Tim Tierney's call for 'fair' e-book prices for libraries adopted by FCM: Library Board chair says libraries can end up paying 3-5 times more for an e-book  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/tim-tierney-s-call-for-fair-e-book-prices-for-librarie  Regina Public Library’s Andrea Newland says they've had reduce certain items  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/low-dollar-impacts-regina-libraries-1.3491  Edmonton Library's buying power shrinking as dollar drops  High cost of E-books also putting pressure on library's budget.  http://www.metronews.ca/news/edmonton/2016/03/14/edmonton-library-buying-power-sh 18
  19. 19. On the Vendor Front  ProQuest Launches Ebook Central: Pioneering resource simplifies workflows for librarians and users, bringing new efficiency to ebook acquisition and use around the world  Gale Grows Digital Archive Program to Better Address Research Needs and Further Support Digital Humanities: Company will make digital archives available under new Gale Primary Sources brand  Penguin Random House Ebooks Now Licensed for Perpetual Access 19
  20. 20. Free Guide to Ebook Licensing for Public Libraries and Publishers  The Guide describes in detail eight types of licenses most used by public libraries across the world:  http://publishingperspectives.com/2015/11/guide-ebook-licensing-for-public-libr – Non-concurrent user license – Concurrent user license – Limited loan licenses – Limited term licenses – Unlimited term licenses – Perpetual license – Subscription license – Pay-per-use license 21
  21. 21. 22 http://www.dosdoce.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Guide-to-Ebook-Licensing-P
  22. 22. Guide to features of eBooks in the University Library collection.  http://www.library.illinois.edu/rex/guides/ebooks/  ABC-CLIO, ACLS Humanities, Brill, Cambridge, Credo, Ebrary, EBSCO, Elsevier Science Direct, Gale, Google, Hathi Trust, IGI Global (Info-Sci), Internet Archive, Oxford Reference, Palgrave, Project Gutenberg, Project Muse, Safari, Sage, Springer, Taylor & Francis, Wiley 23 Vendor Printing Download Use Rights Number of Users E-Reader Compatibility ABC-CLIO Page, chapter or range of pages No License Agreement No limit Can access the eBooks platform in a standard web browser setting on all mobile devices ACLS Humanities Ten pages at a time (from pdfs) Three pages at a time (as pdf) Follows fair-use rights and restrictions No limit Mobile device formats available for sale Brill Whole book (from Read pdf) Whole book Rights & Permissions No limit Whole book (pdf) Cambridge Varies by book; usually either 1 chapter or twenty percent of collection in question Individual chapters Rights & Permissions No limit ( except for select order titles ) Can be downloaded to up to 5 handheld devices Credo Reference Individual entries Individual entries (click on "Print & Export, then "Print") License agreement No limit Individual entries (pdf) Ebrary Yes; maximum dependent upon percentage and number of pages (right click on page text) Create account to download a standard pdf (60 page max) or entire book for 7 days Terms of service & copyright information Limited user titles Requires ebrary Reader. Downloaded sections (from pdf) EBSCO eBooks Up to 60 pages (or fewer depending on the publisher) of an eBook can be printed per user as a PDF file from within the eBook Full Text viewer. In the viewer use the EBSCO print button, not the pdf print button Create account to download and "checkout" the whole book for up to 7 days; otherwise can save up to 60 pages (or fewer depending on the publisher) at a time from the viewer as pdf Depends on the book: 1,3, or unlimited users Whole book when "checked out" pdf, and some have ePub option Elsevier (ScienceDirect)Individual chapters (from pdfs) Individual chapters (as pdf) Re-use Permission Policy No limit Individual chapters (pdf, epub, mobipocket) Gale Virtual Reference The number of pages may depend on the individual publisher specified limits Individual entries/articles/chapters (depending on the book) as html or pdf No limit Individual entries,articles,chapters (download pdf to eReader) Google Public domain books can be printed (from pdf) Whole book (from Google Books not Google Play) No limit ePub and pdf (android, iphone, and ipad apps available) HathiTrust Depends on book; Page by page (non- affiliates) or whole book (with partner login) Page by page (non-affiliates) or whole book (with partner login) See Help Page No limit Depends on book; mobile friendly site; can be downloaded as pdf IGI-Global (Info-Sci) Individual chapters (from pdfs) Individual chapters (as pdf) No limit Individual chapters (pdf) Internet Archive Whole book (options include pdf, epub, daisy, kindle, and more) Whole book Near-unrestricted. See https://archive.org/details/t exts&tab=about for more information. No limit Yes--multiple formats and options available for download. Website designed for mobile as well as desktop users. Oxford Reference Individual entries only; Restrictions on systematic download No See " Users of institutional subscriptions ," under "Legal Notice" No limit No Palgrave Whole book Whole book Terms and conditions No limit Whole book (pdf, and some have ePub option) Project Gutenburg Whole book Whole book (as textfile, html, or format for ereaders) Ebooks from Project Gutenburg are free in the United States because their copyright has expired. They may not be free of copyright in other countries. No limit Whole book (ePub, Kindle, Plucker, QiOO mobile)Mobile Reader How-To Project Muse Sections of chapters or chapters at a time depending on the book (from pdfs) Sections of chapters or chapters at a time depending on the book See license review No limit Sections of chapters or chapters depending on the book (pdf) Safari Individual pages No Near-unrestricted access Limits to 6 simultaneous users on the account No Sage Individual chapters from viewer or pdf Individual chapters (as pdf) Terms of Use No limit Individual chapters (pdf) Springer Whole book and individual chapters (from pdfs or chapters from view screen) Whole book and individual chapters (as pdf) DRM-free; see terms and conditions No limit Whole book (pdf) Taylor & FrancisCRCnetBASE Individual chapters Individual chapters (as pdf) See terms and conditions. No limit Individual chapters (pdf); Mobile version of the site for searching, then can download individual chapters to device (pdf) Wiley
  23. 23. eBook Universe  Canadian vs. International and Big 5  MARC records issue 24
  24. 24. http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Big-Five-Ebook-Terms-011816.pdf Big Five Publishers and Lib. Lending Publisher Terms Lending Pricing Consortia? Penguin Random House As of January 1, 2016, Penguin Random House makes its complete frontlist and backlist of ebooks available for libraries All titles available under perpetual licensing. One circulation at a time with no loan limits or period of use limits. Capped at $65 Yes Harper Collins HarperCollins offers its complete ebook and audio catalog for library lending. In February 2011 HarperCollins instituted a limit of 26 circulations after which the library must renew its license by buying the title again. License must be renewed after 26 loans. Varies – usually HC equivalent or less Yes Macmillan On July 29, 2014, Macmillan announced that its entire frontlist and backlist will be available under its library lending program. All titles are available for a two-year/52-lend period (whichever comes first). Titles published less than 12 months ago: $60. Titles published 12 months ago or more: $40. Yes – not schools Simon & Schuster On November 20, 2014, Simon & Schuster announced that it would no longer require libraries to offer a “Buy It Now” button in order to license its ebooks for library lending. A one-year expiration date on ebooks licensed to libraries. On November 12, 2015, Simon & Schuster announced a pilot program with 550 titles with a special two-year license priced at 1.5 times the one-year price. Prices are generally more than the cost to a consumer, but less than the hard cover edition. Yes – Public Only Hachette As of May 8, 2013, Hachette is making its full catalog of ebooks available for library sold for an unlimited number of single-user-at-a-time circulations. Pricing is always at HBG’s sole discretion. HBG’s pricing is three times hardcover. Case by case25
  25. 25. The Aggregators and Partners  Overdrive, Bibliotheca Cloud Library, B&T Axis 360, MyiLibrary/ProQuest, EBSCO, Permabound, Odilo, Bibliocommons, Follett, Recorded Books (One Click Digital), Mackin Educational Resources, Feedbooks (Europe and Canada) and Gardners (mostly UK) Bolinda, Booksource, etc.  Archambault, Canadian Electronic Library, WhiteHots, etc. 26
  26. 26. Academic and Traditional eBooks  Cengage Gale  McGraw Hill About 95% of marketplace  Pearson  OER, OA, etc.  Gale, EBSCO, ProQuest digital vaults and eBook aggregations primary source, archives, etc.  Scholarly Publishers  Institutional Repositories27
  27. 27. New(er) Tools for Digital Times  RDA  APIs  Bibframe  Linked Data  Tags versus Fields  Crowdsourcing  Federated search  Etc. 28
  28. 28. Join the Movementhttp://www.fairpricingforlibraries.org/ 29
  29. 29. Enjoy the rest of the symposium  Stephen Abram  executive director  Federation of Ontario Public Libraries  Stephen.abram@gmail.com  FOPL.ca  416-669-4855 30

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