Cultural Variations in Childcare Practices
Kibbutzim <ul><li>In Israel a communal way of living has been practised by some groups for many years. </li></ul><ul><li>T...
Childcare in a Kibbutz <ul><li>Childcare is also shared.  In the 1920’s kibbutzim began a practice of raising children com...
<ul><li>What would Bowlby suggest about how these children would develop? </li></ul><ul><li>When these children were place...
Uganda <ul><li>Ainsworth studied babies in Uganda, Africa, to identify cultural differences in attachments. </li></ul><ul>...
Findings <ul><li>She found that the infants were securely attached to their mothers. </li></ul><ul><li>She suggested that ...
Conclusion <ul><li>Generally there are more similarities between cultures in terms of attachment than differences. </li></...
Problems in cross-cultural research of attachment <ul><li>Why might studying childcare and attachment across cultures be d...
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Cultural Variations In Childcare Practices

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Cultural Variations In Childcare Practices

  1. 1. Cultural Variations in Childcare Practices
  2. 2. Kibbutzim <ul><li>In Israel a communal way of living has been practised by some groups for many years. </li></ul><ul><li>The members all share the goods produced by the Kibbutz so everybody has the same standard of living. All the members share ownership of the tools and machinery of the Kibbutz. </li></ul><ul><li>Members eat together in communal dining halls and share communal laundry facilities and leisure facilities. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Childcare in a Kibbutz <ul><li>Childcare is also shared. In the 1920’s kibbutzim began a practice of raising children communally, away from their parents in special communities called &quot;Children's Societies“. They are looked after by trained nurses and teachers, (called metapelets ) So both their parents can go out to work during the day for the Kibbutzim </li></ul><ul><li>Children are not totally separated from their parents, and there are different arrangements on different Kibbutzim. </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes the children go back to sleep in their parents accommodation in the evening, or in other Kibbutz the children are visited by their parents in the evening. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>What would Bowlby suggest about how these children would develop? </li></ul><ul><li>When these children were placed in the ‘Strange Situation’, they protested equally when either mother or metapelet left, but were more comforted by their mothers at reunion. </li></ul><ul><li>This would suggest that despite having multiple carers, the infants still had one special relationship. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Uganda <ul><li>Ainsworth studied babies in Uganda, Africa, to identify cultural differences in attachments. </li></ul><ul><li>She studied 4 month olds to 2 year olds. She observed them every fortnight for nine months and interviewed the mothers. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Findings <ul><li>She found that the infants were securely attached to their mothers. </li></ul><ul><li>She suggested that these infants were particularly secure because the mother carries the baby around everywhere closely in a cotton sling. </li></ul><ul><li>Ainsworth also observed that infants were cared for by many other adults in addition to the mother and formed attachments simultaneously with several people. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Conclusion <ul><li>Generally there are more similarities between cultures in terms of attachment than differences. </li></ul><ul><li>Separation distress at the age of around 7 months is consistent across cultures. </li></ul><ul><li>What does this suggest about attachment, is it nature or nurture? </li></ul>
  8. 8. Problems in cross-cultural research of attachment <ul><li>Why might studying childcare and attachment across cultures be difficult? </li></ul><ul><li>The researchers interpretation of the behaviour may be biased, because s/he may believe their culture is the best way and other different ways are wrong. </li></ul><ul><li>What is it called in psychology when researchers see one culture as better than another? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethnocentrism </li></ul></ul><ul><li>It is wrong to generalise about one culture because there may be many differences within that culture. </li></ul>

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