WordPress as a CMS

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WordPress U workshop from HighEdWeb 09

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  • With plugins, pages can do all these things too.
  • Sky is green, up is down, and we have always been at war with Eurasia.



    Posts and pages share the same database table; they have all the same fields.
  • So what are all the things you can store in the WordPress database?
  • * - unless you are a traveling circus or a Kogi taco truck
  • ... about which, more later.
  • About ten new plugins are added every day.
  • This is Register Plus.
  • If you just want to change one or two capabilities, you can dig into the Codex list of capabilities and make the changes in your functions.php file -- but you’ll have to remember to copy these lines if you change themes.
  • Among other things, you can choose which roles can edit or read private posts and pages -- or you can create a whole new role for that purpose.
  • WordPress as a CMS

    1. 1. WordPress as a CMS Stephanie Leary Texas A&M University
    2. 2. Why WordPress?
    3. 3. Blogging vs. Content Management
    4. 4. CMS Capabilities • posts vs. pages • scheduled publishing • basic workflow • easy media embedding • excellent SEO • ubiquitous feeds
    5. 5. Killer Feature
    6. 6. Posts • included in feeds • categories • tags • excerpts • comments and trackbacks • custom fields
    7. 7. Pages • not included in feeds • page parent • template • menu order • comments and trackbacks • custom fields
    8. 8. Pages * • included in feeds • categories • tags • excerpts
    9. 9. Dirty little secret: Posts are pages. Pages are posts.
    10. 10. Things that are posts • blogs • newsletters • news archives • magazines • press releases • journals • podcasts • ...
    11. 11. Things that are posts • anything you want in a feed • anything that should be organized by date
    12. 12. Things that are pages • About Us • Our Mission • Hours and Locations *
    13. 13. Things that are pages • anything that does not often change • anything that is not organized by date
    14. 14. Other things • Media uploads • Users • Links
    15. 15. Demo • installation • file import • basic options • Reading settings • permalinks
    16. 16. Less blog, more CMS • magazine-style home page • great URL structure • no “category” or “archives” • contextual navigation • breadcrumbs • subpage listings
    17. 17. Magazine layouts • multiple content areas • category sections • list of subpages • widgets
    18. 18. Required theme files 1. index.php 2. style.css
    19. 19. Recommended files 3. functions.php 4. screenshot.png
    20. 20. More files
    21. 21. How a theme file works • get_header • The Loop • get_sidebar • get_footer
    22. 22. Inside the Loop • title • content / excerpt • date • categories • tags • author • custom fields
    23. 23. Complicating matters • Custom loops • Multiple loops
    24. 24. Modifying the query • limit • parent • offset • categories & tags • sort order • include • exclude • type • author • status
    25. 25. Resetting the query $q = new WP_Query(); $q->query('showposts=5'); while ($q->have_posts()) : $q->the_post(); the_content(); endwhile;
    26. 26. Resetting the query wp_reset_query();
    27. 27. Outside the loop • header • footer • sidebar
    28. 28. Sidebars • one included by default • get_sidebar(); • can use more than one with PHP file include syntax • <?php include_once (TEMPLATEPATH . "/nav.php"); ?>
    29. 29. Theme/plugin hybrid can be defined in functions.php or installed as part of a plugin
    30. 30. Built-in widgets • Archives • Meta • Categories • log in/out • feed • Calendar • Recent posts • Links • Tag cloud • RSS* • Text • Pages
    31. 31. Creating your own
    32. 32. 6,735* official plugins * at last count
    33. 33. Plugins can... • add widgets • provide custom fields • create template tags • alter write screens • modify loops • add JS libraries • create shortcodes • ... • alter user roles
    34. 34. Useful plugins
    35. 35. Writing your own
    36. 36. We want... • pages • a blog • subscribe to comments • a podcast • a contact form w/spam guard • a private area • users to be redirected on login
    37. 37. Demo • activate plugins • set options • create private user
    38. 38. Users • username • IM info • name • Gravatar • email • bio • URL
    39. 39. Adding user fields
    40. 40. Roles • Admin • Editor • Author • Contributor • Subscriber
    41. 41. Publish settings • Public • Password-protected • Private
    42. 42. Problems with “private” • visibility: menus • granularity: groups • privileges: roles
    43. 43. Changing capabilities /* allow subscribers to view private posts and pages (functions.php) */ $subRole = get_role( 'subscriber' ); $subRole->add_cap( 'read_private_pages' ); $subRole->add_cap( 'read_private_posts' );
    44. 44. Role Manager
    45. 45. Hiding the admin area • Sidebar Login • Front-end Editor • P2 • Posthaste
    46. 46. Moving servers • Changing domains • edit database fields • use config file constants • Changing directories • maintaining permalinks
    47. 47. Caching • WP Cache • Super Cache • W3 Total Cache
    48. 48. 2.9 Features • image editor • easy changes to contact profile • trash fields • posts • included handbook • pages • printable • comments • category-slug.php • new excerpt filters http://codex.wordpress.org/Version_2.9
    49. 49. What’s different in MU? • Each user gets a blog • Each blog gets a set of db tables • Users can’t upload themes or plugins • Site-wide plugins installed for all* • Site Admin screen (and role)
    50. 50. Thank you. Stephanie Leary Texas A&M University @sleary uwc.tamu.edu sillybean.net wordpress-as-cms.com

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