Emerging Markets and User Research - Apala Chavan

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Talk by Apala Chavan, HFI, at the STC India UX Conference on Saturday, August 27, 2011, conducted at WE School, Bangalore.

https://sites.google.com/site/stcindiaux/speakers#Apala

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Emerging Markets and User Research - Apala Chavan

  1. 1. Innovative Solutions – What Designers Need to Know for Today’s Emerging Markets Human Factors International, Inc. User Experience for a Better World Apala Lahiri Chavan Chief Oracle and Innovator Human Factors International 27th,August 2011 Bengaluru© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. Human Factors International Pioneering User Experience strategy, research, and design since 1981 Largest User Experience company in the world Local proximity, global reach…© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 2
  3. 3. Human Centered Design Attention § Unconscious Learning § Motivation § Arousal Decision § Emotion© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 3
  4. 4. The HFI Framework™ Version 6.0 Innovation and User-Experience Design© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 4
  5. 5. © 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 5
  6. 6. This is a journey "through the looking glass" of different world views, different realities, and different conventions.© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 6
  7. 7. © 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 7
  8. 8. Another Culture But The Same Design? We already know that the usual ways of designing and introducing a product or a service may not work anymore in the newly opened markets. Not only do the cultural differences play a major role in what, how, and why customers behave the way they do, but the existing technologies, distribution channels, people’s wants and needs become new elements to consider.© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 8
  9. 9. The Three Myths About Emerging Markets!© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 9
  10. 10. © 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 10
  11. 11. Emerging markets are nations with social or business activity in the process of rapid growth and industrialisation. - Wikipedia Emphasizing the fluid nature of the category, political scientist Ian Bremmer defines an emerging market as “a country where politics matters at least as much as economics to the markets.” According to The Economist, many people find the term outdated, but no new term has yet to gain much traction. Emerging market hedge fund capital reached a record new level in the first quarter of 2011 of $121 billion. "regions of the world that are experiencing rapid informationalization under conditions of limited or partial industrialization." - Emerging Market Report, 2008 It appears that emerging markets lie at the intersection of non-traditional user behavior, the rise of new user groups and community adoption of products and services, and innovations in product technologies and platforms. -Emerging Market Report, 2008© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 11
  12. 12. The Themes 1. Culture 2. People 3. Technology 4. Transition© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 12
  13. 13. Culture© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 13
  14. 14. Who Exactly are the Emerging Markets?© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 14
  15. 15. Culturally Speaking…© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 15
  16. 16. The Story of a Pair of Non Identical Twins The 3 charts below and on the next slide present the position of each of the three countries with respect to each cultural dimension. This is based on our own research. Interestingly, we found a lot of difference between what we saw and what we had read with respect to secondary research data regarding these countries and there position on these dimensions.. India - China - USA -© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 16
  17. 17. The Story of a Pair of Non Identical Twins India - China - USA -© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 17
  18. 18. Genre of Methods© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 18
  19. 19. Culturally Speaking…© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 19
  20. 20. People© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 20
  21. 21. Demographically Speaking…© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 21
  22. 22. Older or Younger?© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 22
  23. 23. Viewing the Population - China© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 23
  24. 24. Viewing the Population - Brazil© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 24
  25. 25. Viewing the Population - India© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 25
  26. 26. Viewing the Population - India© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 26
  27. 27. Technology© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 27
  28. 28. Technologically Speaking… Technology adoption and usage has sometimes been unexpectedly much ahead of mature/developed markets. The ubiquitous rise and rise of the cell phone is a prime example. Technology has, like the cell phone, often become the great equalizer in these , often unequal and hierarchical economies. The population in these countries are eager to adopt and use technology in spite of some obvious disadvantages like illiteracy and very low income levels. What is happening in Asia is a "re-imaging" of the role of the mobile - Dr. Genevieve Bell.© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 28
  29. 29. Technologically Speaking…© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 29
  30. 30. Transition© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 30
  31. 31. A Common Thread The profile of the typical global consumer will be very different very soon! Individually poor BUT collectively rich VERSUS Individually rich AND collectively rich.© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 31
  32. 32. Another Culture But The Same Design? Designing for Emerging Markets© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 32
  33. 33. A Cautionary Tale!© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 33
  34. 34. DNA of ‘this as well as that’ 34 “Societies change around their DNA. And plurality or „this as well as that‟ is the DNA of indian society. The concept of avatars creates many dramatically different manifestations of the same god. The bloodthirsty kali, the patient wife parvati and the strong ten armed durga are all but different forms of the same divine feminine power.” Bijapurkar© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 34
  35. 35. Role of User Research© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 35
  36. 36. In China© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 36
  37. 37. Role of User Research© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 37
  38. 38. Role of User Research© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 38
  39. 39. In Africa© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 39
  40. 40. © 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 40
  41. 41. © 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 41
  42. 42. In India© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 42
  43. 43. Role of User Research© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 43
  44. 44. Environment© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 44
  45. 45. Environment© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 45
  46. 46. Environment© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 46
  47. 47. The Ecosystem View© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 47
  48. 48. The Ecosystem View Maid Grocery Consumers Kids activity Personal friends Shopping Internet forums Work Car Club Relatives Restaurants Business Pubs Parks contact Cafes© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 48
  49. 49. 1. Discovering an Entire New Segment of Users 2. Advising against entering a new market 3. Advising relook at strategy for a specific segment.© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 49
  50. 50. From Trendwatching© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 4-50 50
  51. 51. From Trendwatching© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 4-51 51
  52. 52. © 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 52
  53. 53. Research Methods© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 53
  54. 54. The Research Method Makes All the Difference© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 54
  55. 55. The Research Method Makes All the Difference© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 55
  56. 56. Vuja De and Culture Strain Vuja de Vuja de happens when you enter a situation youve been in a thousand times before, but with the sense of being there for the first time. Cultural Ideal versus Cultural Practice The places where the tensions are strongest between those two things are the most interesting. Theyre also often places where technologies are very successful.© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 56
  57. 57. Culture specific methods 57  Bollywood Technique  Jungian Archetype Probe  Emotion Ticket  Funky Facilitator  Bizarre Bazaar  The Genie Box  The Semantic Dial© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 57
  58. 58. © 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 58
  59. 59. Delving into ‘Rasa’s [Emotion]:Inspiration from the Structure ofIndian Esthetics, Art Forms & Poetics Rasas are the essence of our emotions that exist both in the body and the mind. The central objective of classical Indian art and drama is to create rasa in the spectators, in order to communicate or suggest a kind of knowledge that cannot be clearly expressed in words. Classical Indian art will try to cover all rasas found in life, but will focus on the most desirable rasas. Less agreeable rasas may also enter Indian art, but mostly to create the contrast that makes the agreeable rasas even more powerful.© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 59
  60. 60. Delving into ‘Rasa’s [Emotion]:Inspiration from the Structure ofIndian Esthetics, Art Forms & Poetics This culture probe was designed as a set of cinema ‘Emotion tickets’, carrying the Bollywood theme forward. •These tickets were categorized to express the nine ‘rasas’ or emotions used extensively in Indian performing arts. •These ‘rasas’ were surprise,happiness, anger, loathing, courage, desire,disgust/despair, mirth, pity •Each ‘rasa’ was expressed through images and dialogues from Bollywood films. •Users were expected to articulate their feelings when interacting/using any financial service and/or technology, by recording it using the appropriate rasa.© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 60
  61. 61. Jungian Archetype Folk Probes This method has been designed to make use of archetype folk characters rooted in the Chinese culture and to have users transfer those archetypal characteristics to other contexts. The method entails using little pewter statues of characters from Chinese folk tales. These characters are very well known amongst the Chinese population. Exploring archetypal associations in a „playful‟ and projective mode helps elicit unfiltered and deep responses from normally „formal‟ and „not free with strangers‟ Chinese users.© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 61
  62. 62. The Bollywood Method  During the user testing the users were subjected to dramatized scenarios rather than a simple statement of the task.  The idea was to help users get over the problem of articulating what they are thinking when doing the tasks.  It is usually very difficult for Indian users to „talk aloud‟ when doing a task during usability testing. Immersing them via a scenario seems to help take attention away from the „seriousness‟ of the task.  It was also noticed that using metaphors from cricket (such as the analogy of the very popular cricket commentators who provide running commentary of the game) and Indian commercial films further helped the process of articulation© 2010 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 62
  63. 63. Thank You…Thank You… Human Factors International, Inc. User Experience for a Better Worldhfi@humanfactors.com

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