The 4 Pillars of Education

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The 4 Pillars of Education. A complete Education must incorporate all these in its curriculum

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The 4 Pillars of Education

  1. 1. Know Do 4 Pillars of Education Live Together Be
  2. 2. ... education is at the heart of both personal and community development; its mission is to enable each of us, without exception, to develop all our talents to the full and to realize our creative potential, including responsibility for our own lives and achievement of personal aims. Jacques Delors (Delors, 1996, p 17)
  3. 3. LEARNING TO KNOW
  4. 4. Learning to Know Implies learning how to learn by developing one's Concentration, Memory skills and Ability to Think.
  5. 5. Learning to Know Learning to Know involves the development of Knowledge and Skills that are needed to function in the world. These skills include Literacy, Numeracy and Critical Thinking.
  6. 6. People have to learn to understand the world around them by combining a sufficiently broad general knowledge with the opportunity to work in depth on a small number of subjects. This also means learning to learn (autonomous learning), so as to benefit from the opportunities education provides throughout life. As a result of learning, the person is transformed — they are more Enlightened, more Empowered, more Enriched.
  7. 7. Learning to Know helps individuals to:  Develop values and skills for respecting and searching for knowledge and wisdom  Learn to learn  Acquire a taste for learning throughout life  Develop critical thinking  Acquire tools for understanding the world  Create a curious mind/learner  Understand sustainability concepts and issues
  8. 8. The Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) developed some Indicators and Measures of the ―Learning to KNOW‖ Pillar that can be applied to Community, School, State, Country and Continent. Pillar Indicator Measure Average travel time to elementary or secondary school Average travel time to university or college University Proportion of adults (25-64) who have attainment completed a university program Proportion of youth (20-24) who are PSE Participation participating in post-secondary education Proportion of youth (20-24) who have not High-school completed high school and are not attending dropout rate school Mean problem-solving score for youth (15yrs) Youth literacy skills Mean reading scores for youth (15yrs) Mean math scores for youth (15yrs) Learning to Know Access to learning institutions PSE: Post-Secondary Education
  9. 9. In summary; Learning to Know helps with the knowledge and information needed to work in a globalized, information society and knowledge economy, and the tools for learning how to learn and to independently acquire knowledge.
  10. 10. LEARNING TO DO
  11. 11. Learning to Do It describes putting knowledge and learning into practice innovatively through (1)Skill development and (2)Practical know-how, (3)Development of (4)Life skills, competence, (5)Personal qualities, (6)Aptitudes and (7)Attitudes.
  12. 12. Learning to Do Learning to Live Do involves the acquisition of Skills that are often linked to occupational success, such as computer training, managerial training and apprenticeships.
  13. 13. Learning to Do: Clearly defined task Routinal practice transmission Ascendancy of knowledge & information Development of personal competence Development of social behaviour Aptitude for teamwork Risk taking initiative and readiness Excellent interpersonal skill
  14. 14. All things considered, the new forms of personal competence are based on a:  Body of theoretical & practical knowledge  Personal dynamism  Good problem-solving,  Decision-making,  Innovative and  Team skills.
  15. 15. It is clear that Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) needs to encompass all four pillars of learning in order to prepare the individual with the knowledge, skills, qualities, values, attitudes and abilities to communicate effectively and work together productively with others. ―Learning to DO‖ is anchored within the context of lifelong learning and TVET, in preparation for life and the world of work.
  16. 16. Learning to DO: Learning to DO: Learning to DO: identifies work-related values for technical and vocational education and training that contribute to the development of the whole person; the worker and the citizen with the knowledge, values, attitudes, behaviours and skills, needed to be able to participate fully and work effectively, ethically and responsibly, in a globalized world. . . . in order to acquire not only an occupational skill, but also, more broadly, the competence to deal with many situations and work in teams. It also means learning to do in the context of young peoples‘ various social and work experiences which may be informal, as a result of the local or national context, or formal, involving courses, alternating study and work. represents the skillful, creative and discerning application of knowledge, one must first learn how to learn effectively, how to think creatively, critically and holistically, and how to deeply understand the information that is presented, and its systemic implications for individuals and for society, in both the short and longer term.
  17. 17. The Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) developed some Indicators and Measures of the ―Learning to DO‖ Pillar that can be applied to Community, School, State, Country and Continent. Indicator Measure Proportion of employers who offer any Availability of type of classroom of workplace training for workplace training their employees Proportion of adults (25-64) who participated in job-related training in Participation in job- previous year related training Proportion to adults (25-64) who participated in any form of job-related training during the last six years Access to Average travel time to vocational schools, vocational training business and secretarial schools Learning to Do Pillar
  18. 18. LEARNING TO LIVE TOGETHER
  19. 19. Learning to Live together Learning to live together in peace and harmony is a dynamic, holistic and lifelong process through which (the shared values) are internalized and practised. The process begins with the development of inner peace in the minds and hearts of individuals engaged in the search for truth, knowledge and understanding.
  20. 20. Learning to Live Together Learning to Live Together involves the development of social skills and (1) values such as respect and (2) concern for others, social and (3) inter-personal skills and an appreciation of the diversity of the World.
  21. 21. Education should adopt two complementary approaches. From early childhood:  It should focus on the discovery of other people in the first stage of education.  In the second stage of education and in lifelong education, it should encourage involvement in common projects. Discovery of other people Encourage involvement in common projects
  22. 22. Discovery of other people  Teach pupils and students about human diversity  Instill in them an awareness of the similarities and interdependence of all people Some subjects lend themselves to this human geography in basic education, foreign languages and literature later on  Children should be taught to understand other people's reactions by looking at things from their point of view  Teaching the history of religions or customs can provide a useful reference tool for moulding future behaviour  Recognition of the rights of other people should not be jeopardized by the way children and young people are taught One of the essential tools for education in the twenty-first century will be a suitable forum for dialogue and discussion.
  23. 23. Encourage involvement in common projects  Introduce young people to collaborative projects from an early age ,  The renovation of slum areas,  Help for disadvantaged people,  Humanitarian action,  Senior citizen help schemes  Involvement of teachers and pupils in common projects can help to teach a method for resolving conflicts and provide a valuable source of reference for pupils in later life.
  24. 24. Educational initiatives For Learning to Live Together Educational initiative Nature of learning goals Peace education Conflict resolution, peace, reconciliation, tolerance, respect for human rights, civic participation Education for mutual understanding Multicultural/intercultural education Human rights education Life-skills‘/ health education Citizenship education Education for sustainable development Humanitarian education Values education Social cohesion, respect for diversity, inclusive national identity Tolerance, respect for diversity, antiracism, non-discrimination Respect for human rights and responsibilities, rights of women, children and minorities, tolerance, nondiscrimination, prevention of bullying, civic articipation Preventive health/HIV-AIDS prevention, prevention of substance abuse, respect for the health rights of others, respectful relationships Active and responsible participation in civic/political life, democracy, respect for human rights, tolerance Environmental sustainability, respect for the rights and welfare of all Respect for humanitarian norms, humanitarian acts, nondiscrimination Internalization of values of peace, respect and concern for others
  25. 25. The Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) developed some Indicators and Measures of the ―Learning to LIVE TOGETHER‖ Pillar that can be applied to Community, School, State, Country and Continent. Indicator Learning to Live Together Pillar Access to community institutions Volunteering Measure Average travel time to libraries Average travel time to business, civic and social associations Average travel time to religious organisations Proportion of citizens engaged in unpaid work as part og a group or organisation Participation in Proportion of households spending on social social clubs and clubs and other organisations organisations Learning from Proportion of citizens who socialize with other cultures people from other cultures on a regular basis
  26. 26. ■ Learning to live appropriately with others is important in our everyday lives – from life in the school, family and community to the special problems of adolescent relationships. ■ Learning to live together in the wider society requires awareness of and respect for human rights and the responsibilities of local, national and global citizenship. ■ Learning to live together as responsible citizens can help reduce tensions due to ethnic or other divisions and social disparities which contribute to the instability or civil conflict seen in many nations today.
  27. 27. LEARNING TO BE
  28. 28. Learning to Be The all-round development of the whole person, to fulfill his/her highest potential, and be able to think, decide and act independently— the source of creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship. The aim of development is the complete fulfillment of man, in all the richness of his personality, the complexity of his forms of expression and his various commitments - as individual, member of a family and of a community, citizen and producer, inventor of techniques and creative dreamer‗.
  29. 29. Learning to Be Learning to Be involves activities that foster personal development (body, mind and spirit) and contribute to creativity, personal discovery and an appreciation of the inherent value provided by these pursuits.
  30. 30. All people should receive in their childhood and youth an education that equips them to develop their own independent, critical way of thinking and judgment so that they can make up their own minds on the best courses of action in the different circumstances in their lives. In that connection, education must not disregard any aspect of a person‘s potential: memory, reasoning, aesthetic sense, physical capacities and communication skills.
  31. 31. Learning to Be The Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) developed some Indicators and Measures of the ―Learning to BE‖ Pillar that can be applied to Community, School, State, Country and Continent. Pillar Indicator Measure Proportion of households spending on Internet Exposure to services media Proportion of households spending on reading material and other printed matter Proportion of households spending on admissions Learning through of museum and other cultural activities culture Proportion of households spending on live performing arts Learning through Proportion of household spending on recreation sports and sports facilities Broadband Proportion of household with access to wireless, Internet access cable, or DSL Access to cultural Average travel time to museum and art galleries resources
  32. 32. The 21st century will need a varied range of talents and personalities even more than exceptionally gifted individuals, who are equally essential in any society. Both children and young persons should be offered every opportunity for aesthetic, artistic, scientific, cultural and social discovery and experimentation, which will complete the attractive presentation of the achievements of previous generations or their contemporaries in these fields. At school, art and poetry should take a much more important place than they are given in many countries by an education that has become more utilitarian than cultural. Concern with developing the imagination and creativity should also restore the value of oral culture and knowledge drawn from children's or adults' experiences
  33. 33. The 4 Pillars guarantees a complete Education 1 Learning to Know 3 Learning to Live together Learning to Do Learning to Be 4 2
  34. 34. The Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) Pillar Indicator Access to learning institutions Measure Average travel time to elementary or secondary school Average travel time to university or college University attainment Proportion of adults (25-64) who have completed a university program PSE Participation Proportion of youth (20-24) who are participating in post-secondary education Learning Proportion of youth (20-24) who have not completed high school and are not attending to Know High-school dropout rate school Mean problem-solving score for youth (15yrs) Youth literacy skills Mean reading scores for youth (15yrs) Mean math scores for youth (15yrs) Proportion of employers who offer any type of classroom of workplace training for their Availability of workplace training employees Proportion of adults (25-64) who participated in job-related training in previous year Learning to Do Participation in job-related training Proportion to adults (25-64) who participated in any form of job-related training during the last six years Access to vocational training Average travel time to vocational schools, business and secretarial schools Average travel time to libraries Access to community institutions Average travel time to business, civic and social associations Average travel time to religious organisations Learning to Live Volunteering Proportion of citizens engaged in unpaid work as part of a group or organisation Together Participation in social clubs and Proportion of households spending on social clubs and other organisations organisations Learning from other cultures Proportion of citizens who socialize with people from other cultures on a regular basis Proportion of households spending on Internet services Exposure to media Proportion of households spending on reading material and other printed matter Proportion of households spending on admissions of museum and other cultural activities Learning Learning through culture Proportion of households spending on live performing arts to Be Learning through sports Proportion of household spending on recreation and sports facilities Broadband Internet access Proportion of household with access to wireless, cable, or DSL Access to cultural resources Average travel time to museum and art galleries
  35. 35. Data source: - Canadian Council on Learning, Composite Learning Index UNESCO resources – Learning to Know, Learning to Do, Learning to together, Learning to Be UNESCO: International Bureau of Education, Geneva, 2004 – Learning to Live Together Analysis by: Wale Micaiah (M.Sc., CISM, CCNP-Sec, MCSA) e: walegate@yahoo.com m: 08078001800 b: walemicaiah.blog.com w. www.statisense.com Freely share, freely use and freely acknowledge the source – © Wale Micaiah

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