Stan FreedaWORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE   1
AGENDA• Competency• Next Generation  Science Standards• Common Core  Connections• Assessment                      WORKSHOP...
SCIENCE COMPETENCY             com·pe·ten·cy       [kom-pi-tuhn-see]             having the behaviors, knowledge, skills  ...
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVALEd 306.27 High School Curriculum, Credits, GraduationRequirements, and Cocurric...
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVALEd 306.27 High School Curriculum, Credits, GraduationRequirements, and Cocurric...
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVALTA #12 Competency Assessment of Student Mastery (2006)State Standards indicate ...
LEARN MORE ABOUT COMPETENCY ONLINE                   www.CompetencyWorks.org                   www.education.nh.gov/innova...
COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS                  com·pe·ten·cy            [kom-pi-tuhn-see]           having the behaviors, knowledg...
SCIENCE STANDARDS            stan·dard [stan-derd]            something set up and established by            authority as ...
NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE STANDARDS                  Phase I                            Phase II     1990s1990s-2009        ...
TIMELINE OF DEVELOPMENT•   National Research Council develops Framework for Science Literacy –    released July 2011•   Ac...
CONCEPTUAL SHIFTS•   K-12 science education should reflect the interconnected nature of    science as it is practiced and ...
THE DNA OF NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE                   • The NGSS are written as                     Performance Expectation...
SCIENCE PRACTICES                   Science Curriculum Framework                                              Science Proc...
CROSS CUTTING CONCEPTS OF SCIENCE                        1. Patterns                          CROSSCUTTING                ...
CORE DISCIPLINES OF SCIENCE                        1. Physical Sciences                                                   ...
Core Disciplines of Science                     PHYSICAL SCIENCESPS1 Matter and its interactionsHow can one explain the st...
Core Disciplines of Science                     LIFE SCIENCES                                                             ...
Core Disciplines of Science                     LIFE SCIENCESLS3 Heredity: Inheritance and variation of traits            ...
Core Disciplines of Science                   EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCES                                                    ...
Core Disciplines of Science                   ENGINEERING, TECHNOLOGY, AND                   APPLICATIONS OF SCIENCE      ...
THE ARCHITECTURE OF NGSS             Illustrate and describe the location of Earth and the Solar System with respect to th...
THE ARCHITECTURE OF NGSS    CROSSCUTTING                    CONTENTPRACTICES                                  WORKSHOP PRE...
COMMON CORE CONNECTIONS IN NGSSThe Final Version will be released shortly.Connections to Common Core are given.Connection ...
NEW WAYS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING  EFFECTIVE SCIENCE TEACHING CAN BE USED AS  A FOCAL POINT THAT EXEMPLIFIES TEACHING  PRA...
CONVERGENCE AT THE CORE• Knowledge through content-rich  text.• Reason abstractly and  quantitatively.• Construct argument...
COMMONALITIES AT THE CORE• REQUIRE THAT TEACHERS FOCUS MORE ATTENTION ON  REASONING AND “THINKING PRACTICES.”• REQUIRE STU...
COMMONALITIES AT THE CORETEACHERS WILL HAVE TO HELP ALL STUDENTS:• EXTERNALIZE THEIR THINKING;• LISTEN CAREFULLY TO ONE AN...
COMMONALITIES AT THE COREAT THE CORE OF ALL THESE STANDARDS IS:• REASONING WITH EVIDENCE.• BUILDING ARGUMENTS AND CRITIQUI...
COMMON PRACTICES               Science and Engineering Practices          1. Asking questions and defining problems.      ...
COMMON PRACTICES                  English Language Arts Capacities             1.   Demonstrate independence.             ...
COMMON PRACTICES                      ELA Capacities manifest as:“construct effective arguments,” “request clarification,”...
COMMON PRACTICES   Points to Consider:   • “Reasoning practices” in all content areas have to be enacted,     and for lear...
THE GOOD NEWS “Reasoning” practices are common to all 3 sets of standards. Big bang for the buck. The practices of discuss...
THE BAD NEWSThe dominant forms of talk in classrooms — recitation and direct instruction —do NOT support reasoning, buildi...
LEARN MORE ABOUT STANDARDS ONLINE                   www.NextGenScience.org                   www.CoreStandards.org        ...
COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS                           stan·dard [stan-derd]            something set up and established by      ...
SCIENCE ASSESSMENT              as·sess·ment [uh-ses-muhnt]              the process of documenting,              usually ...
SCIENCE ASSESSMENT Innovation in Assessment for understanding           • Performance Expectations           • Integrating...
SCIENCE ASSESSMENT Innovation in Assessment for understanding  Do the assessments represent the whole standard? Is the who...
SCIENCE ASSESSMENT Expand your vision by thinking of innovative ways to assess  End-of-Course Assessments       Practical ...
LEARN MORE ABOUT ASSESSMENT ONLINE                   www.nciea.org                   sites.nationalacademies.org/DB       ...
COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS               as·sess·ment [uh-ses-muhnt]       the process of documenting, usually in       measura...
THE TAKE AWAY   The Bottom Line   We cannot effectively teach and assess kids   on the Next Generation Science Standards o...
THE TAKE AWAY  What do we do now?  • We need to take seriously our role as educators in New Hampshire.  • We have to model...
THE END          WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE   46
RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS     New Hampshire Educators Online    www.nheon.org   OPEN NH Professional Development www.opennh.o...
OFFICE OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY                                                 Contact Information @                   S...
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Competency, Assessment, and the Next Genscience Science Standards

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This presentation was part of a workshop for the NH Science Teachers Association Spring Conference, on March 11, 2013 at Keene State College.

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Competency, Assessment, and the Next Genscience Science Standards

  1. 1. Stan FreedaWORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 1
  2. 2. AGENDA• Competency• Next Generation Science Standards• Common Core Connections• Assessment WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 2
  3. 3. SCIENCE COMPETENCY com·pe·ten·cy [kom-pi-tuhn-see] having the behaviors, knowledge, skills and abilities that are necessary for successful demonstration of knowledge and understanding. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 3
  4. 4. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVALEd 306.27 High School Curriculum, Credits, GraduationRequirements, and Cocurricular Program.(b) The required curriculum content shall comply with the following: (4) If a district chooses to offer extended learning opportunities, the extended learning opportunities shall: b. Be governed by a policy adopted by the local school board that: 5. Requires that granting of credits shall be based on a student’s demonstration of competencies, as approved by certified educators; WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 4
  5. 5. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVALEd 306.27 High School Curriculum, Credits, GraduationRequirements, and Cocurricular Program.(d) The local school board shall require that a high school credit can be earned bydemonstrating mastery of required competencies for the course, as approved bycertified school personnel. Each high school shall determine the number of creditsto be awarded for successful demonstration of competencies following completionof a classroom course, independent study, distance learning course, or extendedlearning opportunity. One credit shall equate to the level of rigor and achievementnecessary to master competencies that have been designed to demonstrate theknowledge and skills necessary to progress toward college level and career work.Determination of the weight of each course competency on which credit is based,as well as the degree of mastery on which credit will be granted, shall be a localdecision. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 5
  6. 6. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVALTA #12 Competency Assessment of Student Mastery (2006)State Standards indicate that local districts must have a competencyassessment process and defined competencies in place by the 2008-2009school year. The school approval standards state that local school boardsmay implement competency assessment of student mastery at the highschool level at any time, but it is not required by the state standards until the2008-2009 school year.http://www.education.nh.gov/standards/documents/advisory12.pdf WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 6
  7. 7. LEARN MORE ABOUT COMPETENCY ONLINE www.CompetencyWorks.org www.education.nh.gov/innovati ons/hs_redesign/competencies. htm www.inacol.org/research/comp etency/ WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 7
  8. 8. COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS com·pe·ten·cy [kom-pi-tuhn-see] having the behaviors, knowledge, skills and abilities that are necessary for successful demonstration of knowledge and understanding. Where are we on course competencies? WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 8
  9. 9. SCIENCE STANDARDS stan·dard [stan-derd] something set up and established by authority as a rule for the measure of quantity, weight, extent, value, or quality. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 9
  10. 10. NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE STANDARDS Phase I Phase II 1990s1990s-2009 July 2011 – March 2013 1/2010 - 7/2011 WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 10
  11. 11. TIMELINE OF DEVELOPMENT• National Research Council develops Framework for Science Literacy – released July 2011• Achieve develops Next Generation Standards based on the Framework• First public draft of Next Generation Science Standards - May 2012• NH Science Teachers Association develops review team – December 2012• Second and final public draft of NGSS– January 8, 2013• Recommendations for adoption provided to Commissioner – March/April, 2013• FINAL NGSS release – March 2013• NH Legislature adopts new standards – Spring/Summer 2013 ? WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 11
  12. 12. CONCEPTUAL SHIFTS• K-12 science education should reflect the interconnected nature of science as it is practiced and experienced in the real world.• The Next Generation Science Standards are student performance expectations – not curriculum.• The science concepts build coherently from K-12.• The NGSS focus on deeper understanding of content as well as application of content.• All the Sciences are integrated in the NGSS from K–12.• The NGSS and Common Core State Standards ( English Language Arts and Mathematics) are aligned. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 12
  13. 13. THE DNA OF NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE • The NGSS are written as Performance Expectations • Each Standard represents a combination of all three dimensions. • NGSS will require contextual application of the three dimensions by students. • NGSS promotes Competency in Science. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 13
  14. 14. SCIENCE PRACTICES Science Curriculum Framework Science Process Skills1. Asking questions and defining problems2. Developing and using models3. Planning and carrying out investigations PRACTICES4. Analyzing and interpreting data5. Using mathematics and computational thinking6. Constructing explanations and designing solutions7. Engaging in argument from evidence8. Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 14
  15. 15. CROSS CUTTING CONCEPTS OF SCIENCE 1. Patterns CROSSCUTTING 2. Cause and effect 3. Scale, proportion and quantityNECAP Unifying Themes 4. Systems and system modelsScientific InquiryNature of Science 5. Energy and matterSystems and EnergyModels and Scale 6. Structure and functionPatterns of ChangeForm and Function 7. Stability and change WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 15
  16. 16. CORE DISCIPLINES OF SCIENCE 1. Physical Sciences CONTENT 2. Life Sciences 3. Earth and Space Sciences 4. Engineering, Technology, and the Applications of ScienceNH Science CurriculumFramework ContentDomainsPhysical SciencesLife SciencesEarth Space Science WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 16
  17. 17. Core Disciplines of Science PHYSICAL SCIENCESPS1 Matter and its interactionsHow can one explain the structure, properties, and interactions of CONTENTmatter?PS2 Motion and stability: Forces and interactionsHow can one explain and predict interactions between objects andwithin systems?PS3 EnergyHow is energy transferred and conserved?PS4 Waves and their applications in technologies forinformation transferHow are waves used to transfer energy and information? WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 17
  18. 18. Core Disciplines of Science LIFE SCIENCES CONTENTLS1 From molecules to organisms: Structures andprocessesHow do organisms live, grow, respond to their environment, andreproduce?LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, energy, and dynamicsHow and why do organisms interact with their environment, and whatare the effects of these interactions? WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 18
  19. 19. Core Disciplines of Science LIFE SCIENCESLS3 Heredity: Inheritance and variation of traits CONTENTHow are characteristics of one generation passed to the next? Howcan individuals of the same species and even siblings have differentcharacteristics?LS4 Biological evolution: Unity and diversityHow can there by so many similarities among organisms yet somany different kinds of plants, animals, and microorganisms? Howdoes Biodiversity affect humans? WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 19
  20. 20. Core Disciplines of Science EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCES CONTENTESS1 Earth’s place in the universeWhat is the universe and what is Earth’s place in it?ESS2 Earth’s systemsHow and why is Earth constantly changing?ESS3 Earth and human activityHow do Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect eachother? WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 20
  21. 21. Core Disciplines of Science ENGINEERING, TECHNOLOGY, AND APPLICATIONS OF SCIENCE CONTENTETS1 Engineering designHow does engineering solve problems?ETS2 Links among engineering, technology, scienceand societyHow are engineering, technology, science, and societyinterconnected? WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 21
  22. 22. THE ARCHITECTURE OF NGSS Illustrate and describe the location of Earth and the Solar System with respect to the sizes and structures of the This is the Milky Way galaxy and Universe. Performance Expectation Assessment Boundary: Mathematical models are not expected; use AU for Solar System scale; use light years for universal scale Developing and Using ESS1.A: The Universe and Its Stars: Earth Scale, Proportion and Models: Create and interpret and its solar system are part of the Milky Way Quantity: Different scientificFoundation scale drawings, scale galaxy, which is one of many galaxies in the phenomena correspond toBoxes models, or other depictions universe. different powers-of-ten scales. of differences in scale. Practice PRACTICES Disciplinary Core Idea CONTENT Crosscutting Concept CROSSCUTTING WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 22
  23. 23. THE ARCHITECTURE OF NGSS CROSSCUTTING CONTENTPRACTICES WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 23
  24. 24. COMMON CORE CONNECTIONS IN NGSSThe Final Version will be released shortly.Connections to Common Core are given.Connection to other disciplinary core ideas will be coming. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 24
  25. 25. NEW WAYS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING EFFECTIVE SCIENCE TEACHING CAN BE USED AS A FOCAL POINT THAT EXEMPLIFIES TEACHING PRACTICES FOR ALL COMMON CORE AREAS. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 25
  26. 26. CONVERGENCE AT THE CORE• Knowledge through content-rich text.• Reason abstractly and quantitatively.• Construct arguments.• Critique the reasoning of others.• Argue with evidence. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 26
  27. 27. COMMONALITIES AT THE CORE• REQUIRE THAT TEACHERS FOCUS MORE ATTENTION ON REASONING AND “THINKING PRACTICES.”• REQUIRE STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE IN MAKING THEIR THINKING PUBLIC AND COGENT.• STUDENTS WILL NEED GUIDANCE TO MAKING THEIR THINKING… • Visible • Public • Available to others …IN SPEAKING AND WRITING! WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 27
  28. 28. COMMONALITIES AT THE CORETEACHERS WILL HAVE TO HELP ALL STUDENTS:• EXTERNALIZE THEIR THINKING;• LISTEN CAREFULLY TO ONE ANOTHER AND TAKE ONE ANOTHER SERIOUSLY;• DIG DEEPER INTO THE DATA AND EVIDENCE FOR THEIR POSITIONS;• WORK WITH THE REASONING OF OTHERS. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 28
  29. 29. COMMONALITIES AT THE COREAT THE CORE OF ALL THESE STANDARDS IS:• REASONING WITH EVIDENCE.• BUILDING ARGUMENTS AND CRITIQUING THE ARGUMENTS OF OTHERS.• DEVELOPING RIGOROUS, CONCEPTUALLY STRONG, EVIDENCE-BASED THINKING PRACTICES.• PARTICIPATING IN REASONING-ORIENTED PRACTICES, WITH OTHERS.A FEW MORE OF THESE PRACTICES SEEM TO RELATEEXPLICITLY TO SENSE-MAKING AND DISCUSSION:REASONING, IN THE SERVICE OF MAKING ARGUMENTS. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 29
  30. 30. COMMON PRACTICES Science and Engineering Practices 1. Asking questions and defining problems. 2. Developing and using models. 3. Planning and carrying out investigations. 4. Analyzing and interpreting data. 5. Using mathematics, information and computer technology, and computational thinking. 6. Constructing explanations and designing solutions . 7. Engaging in argument from evidence. 8. Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 30
  31. 31. COMMON PRACTICES English Language Arts Capacities 1. Demonstrate independence. 2. Build strong content knowledge. 3. Respond to the varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline. 4. Comprehend as well as critique. 5. Value evidence. 6. Use technology and digital media strategically and capably. 7. Come to understand other perspectives and cultures. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 31
  32. 32. COMMON PRACTICES ELA Capacities manifest as:“construct effective arguments,” “request clarification,” “ask relevant questions,”“build on others’ ideas,” “articulate their own ideas,” “question assumptions andpremises,” “assess the veracity of claims,” “assess the soundness of reasoning,”“cite specific evidence,” “make their reasoning clear,” “constructivelyevaluate others’ use of evidence,” “evaluate other points of view critically andconstructively,” “express and listen carefully to ideas,” “cite specific textualevidence to support conclusions,” “delineate and evaluate the argument andspecific claims in a text including the validity of the reasoning as well as therelevance and sufficiency of the evidence,” “participate effectively in a range ofconversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.” WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 32
  33. 33. COMMON PRACTICES Points to Consider: • “Reasoning practices” in all content areas have to be enacted, and for learners, most are enacted socially, through talk and writing. • “Social” does not just mean student-led group work. Well- structured social interaction builds in time to think as an individual – making thinking available - metacognition. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 33
  34. 34. THE GOOD NEWS “Reasoning” practices are common to all 3 sets of standards. Big bang for the buck. The practices of discussion transfer from one content domain to another. We now know a great deal about how to induct students, from all backgrounds, into these reasoning practices, through rigorous, content-rich, teacher-guided discussions. Good science teaching has always supported these practices. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 34
  35. 35. THE BAD NEWSThe dominant forms of talk in classrooms — recitation and direct instruction —do NOT support reasoning, building arguments with evidence, explaining,critiquing, and building common ground.Teachers are often not well-prepared to lead academically productive, reasoning-oriented discussions.Teachers often rely on group work, hoping that the hands-on activities, in smallgroups, will teach the students what they need to learn.Even science teachers have a hard time running the discussions. Discussionsare often skipped. “…We just didn’t have time.” WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 35
  36. 36. LEARN MORE ABOUT STANDARDS ONLINE www.NextGenScience.org www.CoreStandards.org www.iste.org/standards WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 36
  37. 37. COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS stan·dard [stan-derd] something set up and established by authority as a rule for the measure of quantity, weight, extent, value, or quality. Where are we on standards? WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 37
  38. 38. SCIENCE ASSESSMENT as·sess·ment [uh-ses-muhnt] the process of documenting, usually in measurable terms, knowledge, skills, attitudes, and beliefs. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 38
  39. 39. SCIENCE ASSESSMENT Innovation in Assessment for understanding • Performance Expectations • Integrating the Three Dimensions  Practices  Core Ideas  Crosscutting Concepts .The performance expectation is clear and the practice, idea, andconcepts are all described. How do you assess? WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 39
  40. 40. SCIENCE ASSESSMENT Innovation in Assessment for understanding Do the assessments represent the whole standard? Is the whole greater than the sum of the parts? • Standard vs. Statements of Performance Expectations • Science and Engineering Practices • Disciplinary Core Ideas • Crosscutting Concepts WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 40
  41. 41. SCIENCE ASSESSMENT Expand your vision by thinking of innovative ways to assess End-of-Course Assessments Practical Tests Observations Performance Investigations Presentations PISA-type Units Fieldwork Selected Response Computer Simulations/Modeling Open Response Portfolios Interpreting Graphs, Tables, Figures Concept Mapping Video WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 41
  42. 42. LEARN MORE ABOUT ASSESSMENT ONLINE www.nciea.org sites.nationalacademies.org/DB ASSE/BOSE/Topics/DBASSE_0 70456 assessment.aaas.org WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 42
  43. 43. COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS as·sess·ment [uh-ses-muhnt] the process of documenting, usually in measurable terms, knowledge, skills, attitudes, and beliefs. Where are we on assessment? WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 43
  44. 44. THE TAKE AWAY The Bottom Line We cannot effectively teach and assess kids on the Next Generation Science Standards or the Common Core using technology and an online assessment unless we use the teaching and learning models suggested by the Next Generation Science Standards and the Common Core State Standards. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 44
  45. 45. THE TAKE AWAY What do we do now? • We need to take seriously our role as educators in New Hampshire. • We have to model these core ideas in our actions and teaching. • We have to insist that our professional development fits this active teaching model. • Engages socially through peer interactions • Stresses metacognitive processes • Extends learning beyond the “workshop” or “webinar” or “seminar” • Requires a project based / demonstration product to assess learning • Incorporates technology to engage and enhance the experience WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 45
  46. 46. THE END WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 46
  47. 47. RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS New Hampshire Educators Online www.nheon.org OPEN NH Professional Development www.opennh.org NH Digital Resources Consortium www.nhdrc.org NH Educational GIS Partnership www.nhedgis.orgScience www.education.nh.gov/instruction/curriculum/science Open Education Resources www.oercommons.org Thinkfinity www.thinkfinity.org NSTA Learning Center www.learningcenter.nsta.org WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 47
  48. 48. OFFICE OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY Contact Information @ Stan Freeda New Hampshire Technology Readiness Coordinator Office of Educational Technology New Hampshire Department of Education Stanley.Freeda@doe.nh.gov 603.271.5132 www.education.nh.gov www.nheon.org www.opennh.org WORKSHOP PRESENTATION OUTLINE 48

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